Given any 1-hop labeled relationship (e.g., cells have values from {1,2,…,n} then there is: 1. a natural n-hop transitive relationship, AD, by alternating entities for each individual label value bitmap relationships. 2. cards for each entity consisting of the bitslices of cell values. E.g., netflix, Rating(Customer,Movie) has label set {0,1,2,3,4,5}, so in 1. it generates a bonafide 6-hop transitive relationship. R3(C,M) 4 3 2 1 A E 0 0 0 0 0 10 00 00 0 0 10 000 000 01 0 0 10 000 000 001 1 00 1 2 3 4 5 0 10 000 000 001 1 00 1 1 00 000 110 00 1 0 00 11 00 1 0 1 0 1 3 4 5 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 2 3 4 5 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 4 3 2 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 CD R0(M,C) C M 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 2 3 4 5 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 4 3 2 1 R4(M,C) R0(E,F) ... D F Below, as in 2., Rn-i can be bitslices R5(C,M) 2 M Rn-2(E,F) Rn-1(E,F) R1(C,M) 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 M 0 1 1 1 4 3 2 1 R2(M,C) C C R1(A)= "Movies rated 1 by all customers in A. R2(R1(A))= "Cust who rate as 2, all R1(A) movies" = "Cust who rate as 2, all movies rated as 1 by all A-cust". R3(R2(R1(A)))= "Movies rated as 3 by all R2(R1(A)) customers" = R4(R3(R2(R1(A))))= "Movies rated as 3 by all customers who rate as 2 all movies rated as 1 by all A-customers". "Customers who rate as 4 all R3(R2(R1(A))) movies" = "Customers who rate as 4 movies rated as 3 by all customers who rate as 2 all movies rated as 1 by all A-customers". R5(R4(R3(R2(R1(A)))))= "Movies rated as 5 by all R4(R3(R2(R1(A)))) customers" = "Movies rated 5 by all customers who rate as 4 movies rated as 3 by all customers who rate as 2 all movies rated as 1 by all A-customers". R0(R5(R4(R3(R2(R1(A))))))= R0(R5(R4(R3(R2(R1(A))))))  D "Customers who rate as 0 all R5(R4(R3(R2(R1(A))))) movies" = "Cust who rate as 0 all movies rated 5 by all cust who rate as 4 movies rated as 3 by all cust who rate as 2 all movies rated as 1 by all A-cust". E.g., equity trading on a given day, QuantityBought(Cust,Stock) w labels {0,1,2,3,4,5} (where n means n thousand shares) so that generates a bonafide 6-hop transitive relationship: E.g., equity trading - moved similarly, (define moved similarly on a day --> StockStock(#DaysMovedSimilarlyOfLast10) E.g., equity trading - moved similarly2, (define moved similarly to mean that stock2 moved similarly to what stock1 did the previous day.Define relationship StockStock(#DaysMovedSimilarlyOfLast10) E.g., Gene-Experiment, Label values could be "expression level". Intervalize and go! Has Strong Transitive Rule Mining (STRM) been done? Are their downward and upward closure theorems already for it? Is it useful? That is, are there good examples of use: stocks, gene-experiment, MBR, Netflix predictor,... 2 3 4 5 A
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Preamble “Post-amble” Block Execution: 3 Detail Observing Block Observing Block “Post-amble” “Post-amble” 3 Observing Block Observing Block ok Measurement Set ready “Post-amble” EVLA Data Processing PDR Observing Observing Block Block Observing Observing Block Block Failed! Preamble “Post-amble” Preamble ok ?4 5 Preamble ready Preamble Observing Observing Block Block Observing Observing Block Block Observing Block Observing Block Measurement Set “Post-amble” “Post-amble” Preamble Preamble “Post-amble” Measurement Set “Post-amble” “Post-amble” “Post-amble” July 18 - 19, 2002 2 2 Observing Observing Block Block Block Observing Observing Observing Block Block ok Archive: Preamble Observing Block Observing Block 34 ready Preamble “Post-amble” 1 3 Observing Block Observing Observing Block Block Observing Block Observing Observing Block Block ready Preamble Execution: Preamble ready Observing Observing Block Block Observing Observing Block Block Preamble Observing Block Observing Block 22 “Post-amble” “Post-amble” Preamble Preamble 1 “Post-amble” Preamble Input Queue: ok Measurement Set Boyd Waters 13
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A COMMUNITY NEEDS ASSESSMENT OF HOLOCAUST SURVIVORS Melissa Pullman, PhD1, Wendy Zeitlin, PhD2, Charles Auerbach, PhD1 , Kelly Klinger, BA2 Yeshiva University, New York, New York; 2Montclair State University, Montclair, New Jersey 1 Discussion Unclosable Gaps: Two gaps were identified that would be unable to be closed by traditional resources alone, as they deal with structural problems in society-at-large. Congregate care – skilled nursing facilities and/or assisted living could be helpful for some survivors if there could be a community of survivors that could live together AND appropriate services (including home care for those who live in assisted living facilities) existed. Because this population had been traumatized by institutionalization previously, congregate care generally designed for the elderly, is considered undesirable. As such, without specialized services, it is highly desirable for survivors to remain in their homes in situations which differ from those of other elderly. To date, no such facility has been built in the US, and it is anticipated that this is a need that is not feasible to meet. In-home psychiatric care – while numerous research participants indicated that this service is needed, there are an insufficient number of psychiatrists nationwide, and the need for psychiatric care, in general, is growing for all populations. It is not likely that this gap will be closed any time as the number of psychiatrists retiring continues to rise, and the number of residency spots for new psychiatrists is held steady. www.eposterboards.com Discussion (cont.) Existing services: Professional Social Work Services - includes services such as case management, clinical social work, mental health counseling, friendly visiting, financial guardianship, and social programs. In short, social work services include all services that would include direct services provided by licensed social workers and those overseen by licensed social workers. Services such as social work/case management are not adequately funded currently. One participant stated the need for these services clearly: The social worker helps them [survivors] to get hooked up to services they are resistant to or helps them through the barriers. They help them think about what their needs are. It is hard to get through the door and win their trust. On- on-one service is very expensive. Home Care - includes services such as housekeeping, companionship, in-home nursing and home health aides. There was unanimous agreement that one of the most import factors in preserving the dignity of survivors is the ability to remain at home. An important theme, more knowledge about survivors to the home health aides, emerged from the data. Specialized home care services were addressed by one participant: Aides are trained to understand the history and special needs of the survivors. For example, even knowing that chemical smells can trigger memories for the client. Transportation - includes door-to-door transportation to both medical appointments and social events designed for Holocaust survivors. While underfunded, participants agreed that this service was needed to help survivors remain in their homes and maintain their dignity: Survivors need transportation, otherwise they can’t access the city services. Food support - includes Meals-On-Wheels and additional supplementary support for food, including grocery store vouchers. Having abundant food was an important issue to survivors, who often hoard because they are afraid food will run out. One provider commented on the importance of food in keeping survivors in the community. Another noted the needed for Meals-On-Wheels: Food stamps don’t fulfill food for a whole week; some can’t go to the grocery store, so they need already made meals. Emergency Cash Assistance - The German government currently provides a limited amount of emergency cash to survivors for one-time expenses. This is similar to a small business’s “petty cash.” This is currently used for a wide range of expenses, some of which are actually long-term needs. Examples of how emergency cash is used includes: rent, utility bill, durable medical equipment such as hearing aids or hospital beds, and dental bills. One interviewee noted how this is often insufficient: It is not a generous enough cap for the survivors to maintain their dignity.… basic needs aren’t even met, capped at $2,500 is too little. Sometimes they are in the middle of their medical/dental work and they don’t know what to do when the $2,500 runs out. Conclusion and Implications While it is unlikely that some needs identified in this research will be able to be met in survivors’ lifetimes, many could. While most services identified in this research currently exist, all service providers indicated that inadequate funding make it likely that an increasing number of survivors’ needs will go unmet in the future. The population of Holocaust survivors is aging with the youngest being in their 70s. Research indicates that this population is expected to be reduced by 74% within 15 years (SSRS, 2016); however, the needs of the existing survivors will increase as they age. This will likely put a strain on survivors, their families, and the communities in which they live. Future research should focus on how to best expand and fund services for Holocaust survivors as they continue to age. References Cohen, S. M., Ukeles, J. B., & Miller, R. (2012). Jewish community study of New York: 2011 comprehensive report. New York: UJA Federation of New York. Eriksson, M., Räikkönen, K., & Eriksson, J. G. (2014). Early life stress and later health outcomes—findings from the Helsinki Birth Cohort Study. American Journal of Human Biology, 26(2), 111–116. Keinan-Boker, L., Shasha-Lavsky, H., Eilat-Zanani, S., Edri-Shur, A., & Shasha, S. M. (2015). Chronic health conditions in Jewish Holocaust survivors born during World War II. The Israel Medical Association Journal: IMAJ, 17(4), 206–212. Meyer, M. H., & Daniele, E. A. (2016). Gerontology: Changes, Challenges, and Solutions [2 volumes]: Changes, Challenges, and Solutions. ABC-CLIO. Mitka, M. (2014). Holocaust survivors’ health needs. JAMA, 311(10), 1005. SSRS. (2016). Gap analysis of services to holocaust survivors in New York City, Westchester, and Long Island. Media, PA: Author. Funding for this study was provided by UJA-Federation of New York
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Important Legal Information for Adolescents and Parents According to Iowa law, a minor (an individual younger than 18 years) may seek medical care for the following without the permission or knowledge of his parents: • Substance abuse treatment; • Sexually Transmitted Infection(STI) testing and treatment; • HIV testing – if test is positive, Iowa law requires parent notification; • Contraceptive care and counseling, including emergency contraception; and Even though teenagers young • Blood donation if 17and years of age or adults can receive these treatments older. without their parent’s knowledge, it is important to remember parents are a key part of all aspects of your life. We encourage parents and teens to be open and honest with each other when it comes to health care decisions. It is important for teens to know that if they are covered by their parents’ medical insurance and want it to cover their treatment, they will need to consent to their medical records being shared – possibly even with parents. A minor may also consent for evaluation and treatment in a medical emergency or following a sexual assault. However, treatment information can not be kept confidential from parents. Bill of Rights for Teens and Young Adults • The things you tell us in confidence will be kept private. • We will speak and write respectfully about your teen and family. • We will honor your privacy. YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO: Emotional Support • Care that respects your teen’s growth and development. • We will consider all of your teen’s interests and needs, not just those related to illness or disability. Respect and Personal Dignity • You are important. We want to get to know you. • We will tell you who we are, and we will call you by your name. We will take time to listen to you. • We will honor your privacy. Care that Supports You and Your Family • All teens are different. We want to learn what is important to you and your family. Information You Can Understand • We will explain things to you. We will speak in ways you can understand. You can ask about what is happening to you and why. Care that Respects Your Need to Grow and Learn • We will consider all your interests and needs, not just those related to your illness or disability. Make Choices and Decisions • Your ideas and feelings about how you want to be cared for are important. • You can tell us how we can help you feel more comfortable. • You can tell us how you want to take part in your care. • You can make choices whenever possible like when and where you YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO: receive your treatments. Bill of Rights for Parents Respect and Personal Dignity • You and your teen will be treated with courtesy and respect. Make Decisions About Your Teen’s Care • We will work in partnership with you and your teen to make decisions about his care. • You can ask for a second opinion from another healthcare provider. Family Responsibilities YOU HAVE THE RESPONSIBILITY TO: Provide Information • You have important information about your teen’s health. We need to know about symptoms, treatments, medicines, and other illnesses. • You should tell us what you want for your child. It is important for you to tell us how you want to take part in your teen’s care. • You should tell us if you don’t understand something about your teen’s care. • If you are not satisfied with your teen’s care, please tell us. Provide Appropriate Care • You and the other members of the health care team work together to plan your teen’s care. • You are responsible for doing the things you agreed to do in this plan
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A COMMUNITY NEEDS ASSESSMENT OF HOLOCAUST SURVIVORS Melissa Pullman, PhD1, Wendy Zeitlin, PhD2, Charles Auerbach, PhD1 , Kelly Klinger, BA2 Yeshiva University, New York, New York; 2Montclair State University, Montclair, New Jersey 1 Introduction Holocaust survivors have seen more stress and trauma than virtually any other group in recorded history. Due to the long-term deprivation and maltreatment they experienced earlier in life, survivors have magnified challenges typically associated with aging. Holocaust survivors are more likely to present with mental and physical health problems associated with aging, including high cholesterol, hypertension, diabetes, coronary artery disease, vascular disease, metabolic syndrome, and depression (Eriksson, Räikkönen, & Eriksson, 2014; Keinan-Boker, Shasha-Lavsky, Eilat-Zanani, Edri-Shur, & Shasha, 2015). In New York City, which has one of the highest concentrations of survivors in the world, almost a third (31%) report being in poor overall health, and slightly more than two in five (41%) need help with activities of daily living such as shopping or bathing. These numbers are substantially higher than similarly aged foreignborn peers (Cohen et al., 2012). To further exacerbate their challenges, survivors tend to be poorer than similarly aged seniors with 25% living below the poverty line compared with 20% of their peers nationally (Meyer & Daniele, 2016; Mitka, 2014). In New York City, slightly more than half of households with Holocaust survivors are poor (52%) with 79% of households with survivors from the former Soviet Union living in poverty (Cohen et al., 2012). www.eposterboards.com Research Questions Due to the unique nature of Holocaust survivors as a group, the following research question was posed: “What are the specific needs of this population if the goal would be to identify all services required to help survivors live out the remainder of their lives with dignity and a high quality of life?” Methods We used a qualitative approach and viewed this study as a community needs assessment with the “community” being all Holocaust survivors in the large metropolitan area in which the study was conducted. One of the major challenges to conducting this research is that many Holocaust survivors do not participate in existing social service or reparations programs designed specifically for this community. Therefore, we had to be mindful to specifically seek out those “invisible” survivors who may need services now or in the future. Semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted with fifteen individuals representing six organizations that work with Holocaust survivors in the area. At some of these organizations, specialized services were already in place for survivors, while others operated more generally in communities that possessed concentrated numbers of Jewish immigrant senior citizens. Finally, one organization was funded by the City and provided and/or funded services to senior citizens throughout the City. Interviewees were asked to respond to the following questions: ▶ How does your organization serve Holocaust survivors? What services do you provide? ▶ Tell us about your professional and lay staff that provide services. ▶ In what ways would you like to be able to better serve survivors? ▶ If you could make a wish list of how your organization could improve the lives of the survivors that you serve, what would that look like? To supplement the interviews, a focus group was held that consisted of fourteen front-line workers who work with survivors, often in their homes, and see first-hand the unique challenges this population faces. Examples of questions posed during the focus group include: ▶ What are your major concerns for this aging population? ▶ What are the most common reasons that bring survivors to your agency? ▶ What do you see as the most pressing needs of survivors that might differ from other elderly people? ▶ What haps in services do you see? What are some needs that are not currently being addressed? Methods (cont.) Data were analyzed using thematic analysis. Independently, two researchers highlighted key themes and phrases associated with both the interviews and focus group. Then, jointly, they coded the themes and phrases. Member checking from participants from both the in-depth interviews and focus group was utilized to triangulate and validate findings. Findings Several themes emerged regarding both met and unmet needs of survivors. Services fell into two general categories: needs that could being met to with services that exist to at least some extent and services that do not exist currently and will likely be unmet in the future because of structural/societal challenges. Existing services include: ▶ Professional service work services ▶ Home care ▶ Transportation ▶ Food support ▶ Emergency cash assistance Nonexistent services that likely cannot be met include: ▶ Survivor-specific congregate care ▶ In-home psychiatric care :
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Replay    QoE measurement  Old way: QoE = Server + Network  Modern way: QoE = Servers + Network + Browser Browsers are smart  Parallelism on multiple connections  JavaScript execution can trigger additional queries  Rendering introduces delays in resource access  Caching and pre-fetching HTTP replay cannot approximate real Web browser access to resources 0.25s 0.25s 0.06s 1.02s 0.67s 0.90s 1.19s 0.14s 0.97s 1.13s 0.70s 0.28s 0.27s 0.12s 3.86s 1.88s Total network time GET /wiki/page 1 Analyze page GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET combined.min.css jquery-ui.css main-ltr.css commonPrint.css shared.css flaggedrevs.css Common.css wikibits.js jquery.min.js ajax.js mwsuggest.js plugins...js Print.css Vector.css raw&gen=css ClickTracking.js Vector...js js&useskin WikiTable.css CommonsTicker.css flaggedrevs.js Infobox.css Messagebox.css Hoverbox.css Autocount.css toc.css Multilingual.css mediawiki_88x31.png 2 Rendering + JavaScript GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET ExtraTools.js Navigation.js NavigationTabs.js Displaytitle.js RandomBook.js Edittools.js EditToolbar.js BookSearch.js MediaWikiCommon.css 3 Rendering + JavaScript GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET 4 GET GET GET GET GET GET page-base.png page-fade.png border.png 1.png external-link.png bullet-icon.png user-icon.png tab-break.png tab-current.png tab-normal-fade.png search-fade.png Rendering search-ltr.png arrow-down.png wiki.png portal-break.png portal-break.png arrow-right.png generate page send files send files mBenchLab – [email protected] BROWSERS MATTER FOR QOE? send files send files + 2.21s total rendering time 6
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Transparent Scalability Hardware is free to assign blocks to any processor at any time  A kernel scales across any number of parallel processors Device Device Kernel grid Block 0 Block 1 Block 2 Block 3 Block 0 Block 2 Block 1 Block 3 Block 4 Block 5 Block 6 Block 7  Block 4 Block 5 Block 6 Block 7 time Block 0 Block 1 Block 2 Block 3 Block 4 Block 5 Block 6 Block 7 Each block can execute in any CUDA Tools and Threads – Slide order relative 69
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Transparent Scalability  Hardware is free to assign blocks to any SM (processor)  A kernel scales across any number of parallel processors Device Kernel grid Device Block 0 Block 1 Block 2 Block 3 Block 0 Block 1 Block 4 Block 5 Block 6 Block 7 Block 2 Block 3 Block 4 Block 5 Block 6 Block 7 26 time Block 0 Block 1 Block 2 Block 3 Block 4 Block 5 Block 6 Block 7 Each block can execute in any order relative to other blocks.
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