Field-At-A-Glance (Handout)    2015 – 2016 Generalist MSW Clinical MSW Learning Competencies 1. Assessing needs and resources 2. Providing resources 3. Obtaining resources (case  management) 4. Developing/Improving resources 1. Assessing needs and resources 2. Providing resources 3. Obtaining resources (case  management) 4. Developing/Improving resources 1. Clinical practice with individuals 2. Clinical practice with families 3. Clinical practice with groups Expectations   Entry-level practice Entry-level practice  Community-based clinical practice Type of Internship Spring Semester Only  Concurrent with course work Concurrent with course work Total Internship Hours 420 Total Field Hours 400 Total Field Hours 600 Total Field Hours Hours/Semesters in Field  (Full Time Students) 28 hours/week during Spring  semester  Average 14 hours/week Fall and  Spring semester (200 hours each  semester) Start 2nd week of Class. Average 20 hours/week Fall and  Spring semester (300 hours each  semester)   Hours/Semesters in Field  (Part Time Students) 17 hours/week Spring semester (250 hours)   14 hours/week Summer semester  (170 hours)  Average 10 hours/week Fall and  Spring (150 hours each semester)  Average 8 hours/week Summer  semester (100 hours)     Average 13 hours/week Fall and  Spring (200 hours each semester)  Average 16 hours/week Summer  semester (200 hours)  Supervision Required 1 hour/week with BSW or MSW 1 hour/week with MSW 1 hour/week with MSW FT – 1.5 hours every other week during  Fall and Spring semesters Field Seminar    FT – 3 hours/week during Spring  semester FT – 1.5 hours every other week during  Fall and Spring semesters PT – 2 hours/week Spring semester  and 1 hour/week Summer semester PT – 1 hour every other week during  Fall, Spring and Summer semesters PT – 1 hour every other week during  Fall, Spring and Summer semesters Field Seminar Instructor Field Seminar Instructor Field Seminar Instructor Field Paperwork turned in to: January 2016 BSW   University of Central Florida - Office of Field Education 5
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Field-At-A-Glance (Handout)    2015 – 2016 Generalist MSW Clinical MSW Learning Competencies 1. Assessing needs and resources 2. Providing resources 3. Obtaining resources (case  management) 4. Developing/Improving resources 1. Assessing needs and resources 2. Providing resources 3. Obtaining resources (case  management) 4. Developing/Improving resources 1. Clinical practice with individuals 2. Clinical practice with families 3. Clinical practice with groups Expectations   Entry-level practice Entry-level practice  Community-based clinical practice Type of Internship Spring Semester Only  Concurrent with course work Concurrent with course work Total Internship Hours 420 Total Field Hours 400 Total Field Hours 600 Total Field Hours Hours/Semesters in Field  (Full Time Students) 28 hours/week during Spring  semester  Average 14 hours/week Fall and  Spring semester (200 hours each  semester) Start 2nd week of Class. Average 20 hours/week Fall and  Spring semester (300 hours each  semester)   Hours/Semesters in Field  (Part Time Students) 17 hours/week Spring semester (250 hours)   14 hours/week Summer semester  (170 hours)  Average 10 hours/week Fall and  Spring (150 hours each semester)  Average 8 hours/week Summer  semester (100 hours)     Average 13 hours/week Fall and  Spring (200 hours each semester)  Average 16 hours/week Summer  semester (200 hours)  Supervision Required 1 hour/week with BSW or MSW 1 hour/week with MSW 1 hour/week with MSW FT – 1.5 hours every other week during  Fall and Spring semesters Field Seminar    FT – 3 hours/week during Spring  semester FT – 1.5 hours every other week during  Fall and Spring semesters PT – 2 hours/week Spring semester  and 1 hour/week Summer semester PT – 1 hour every other week during  Fall, Spring and Summer semesters PT – 1 hour every other week during  Fall, Spring and Summer semesters Field Seminar Instructor Field Seminar Instructor Field Seminar Instructor Field Paperwork turned in to: August 2015 - 16 BSW   University of Central Florida - Office of Field Education 31
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Tutor Assistance • Tutorial assistance helps the student pay for necessary tutoring. • Tutorial assistance is available if you are receiving VA educational assistance • at the half-time or greater rate and • have a deficiency in a subject making tutoring necessary. Overview • The monthly rate of tutorial assistance may not exceed the cost of tutoring or $100. The maximum amount payable is $1200. • There is no entitlement charge for the first $600 under the Montgomery GI Bill (Chapters 30 or 1606), • There is no entitlement charge under the Port-9/11 GI Bill or DEA. Eligibility • All of the following criteria must be met for a student to be eligible for tutorial assistance. • The student must be in a post secondary program ½-time or more. For Chapter 33, rate of pursuit must be “at least 50%.” • The student must have a deficiency in a course that is part of his or her approved program. • The student must be enrolled in the course during the quarter, semester, or term in which the tutoring is received for the course. Tutoring may not occur between quarters or semesters.
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Course Wadley SP and SU 2015 Tutoring Initial Course Course Notes/Next Steps Reviewed? Re-reviewed? YES YES Will migrate two sections to Canvas Spring, 2016 Aminy SP 2015 Tutoring YES YES Schedule migration to Canvas Smith SP 2015 Tutoring YES YES Schedule migration to Canvas Vogel FA 2015 Tutoring and Student Readiness YES In progress ENG 1A Ochi FA 2015 YES In Progress ENG 1A Goulding NO -- ENG 1A Myhren NO -- ENG 1A Gridley Summer 2016 Summer 2016 SP 2016 NO -- ECON 4 Pakula SP 2016 Tutoring and Student Readiness Tutoring and Student Readiness Tutoring and Student Readiness Tutoring, Student Readiness Tutoring, Student Readiness Will migrate one section to Canvas Spring, 2016 NO -- PS 1 Instructor (4 sections) ENG 1A Term Involvement (1 section) PHIL 1 (1 section) ANTHRO 1 (1 section) Will migrate to Canvas 2016
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New Compensatory Time Policy 5.5 Fair Labor Standards Act The Fair Labor Standards Act recognizes two basic categories of employees: • Exempt: Employees not covered by the act • Non-Exempt: Employees covered by the act If an employee’s position is classified as non-exempt, the normal work week is forty (40) hours. An employee is considered to have earned overtime when he/she has worked in excess of forty (40) hours in any work week. A regular work week consists of forty (40) hours (from 12:00 a.m., Saturday through 11:59 p.m., Friday). It is the policy of the University to arrange for all work to be completed within that period. It is recommended that prior authorization from the employee’s immediate supervisor and the department head be given before an employee works in excess of forty (40) hours per week. In determining the number of hours worked by an employee within a given work week, time spent on Annual Leave, Sick Leave and holidays will not be counted as time worked. Any leave or holiday time included in a work week that results in an excess of forty (40) hours is to be compensated at straight time rates only. After excluding holiday and leave time from the total hours worked, if there are still excess hours over forty (40), that time is to be compensated at time-and-a-half. If the manager determines that it is in the best interest of the University to give monetary compensation for the overtime worked, a Comp Time Payout Form along with documentation must be provided and approved by the department head and appropriate Vice President. The following actions are the preferred order for addressing the accumulation of compensatory time: • Supervisors should adjust work schedules and/or leave approval during the workweek to prevent the accumulation of compensatory time. • Supervisors may request or direct employees to use their compensatory time during a period of time that has minimal impact on the work unit’s operations. The action may be taken to reduce the accrued compensatory time balance and avoid cash payments. • Employees must exhaust all accrued compensatory time before use of annual leave. • Employees may also use compensatory time in lieu of sick leave. The Fair Labor Standards Act limits the amount of compensatory time most employees can accrue up to 240 hours. Note: Requests by employees for use of Compensatory Leave Time are handled in the same manner as requests for Annual Leave. Departments will work with employees to schedule Compensatory Leave Time that meets the employee’s needs and least interrupts the duties for the department. Unused Compensatory Time will be paid upon termination of employment.
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Academic Support Centers MILWAUKEE CAMPUS Communication Center offers assistance in business and business-related courses, computer application courses, computer use, keyboarding, medical transcription and multimedia presentations. Room C278. Computer Production Center provides help in computer use, computer programming, computer application courses, keyboarding, multimedia presentations and website creation. Room M273. Math Center helps students in all levels of math, accounting, engineering-related courses, occupational math and statistics. Room C271. Science Center provides assistance in anatomy and physiology, astronomy, biology, biochemistry, chemistry, medical terminology, microbiology, nutrition, physics, psychology, sociology, engineering sciences, social sciences and technical sciences. Room C271. Writing Center works in conjunction with the Online Writing Lab (OWL) to assist students in course-related written assignments including essays, research papers, professional writing and other writing projects in all disciplines. Room C270. Tutoring Services include one-on-one tutoring and study groups. Contact Tutoring Services through the Homework Helpline at 414-297-8376 or 262-238-2479, the Online Tutoring Center, or visit Room C201. Academic Support
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Training Time (CH 30, 35, 1606, 1607) continued VA benefits are paid based on training time. Clock hour training time is measured as follows: 18 Clock Hours Classroom/Theory Predominates: – – – – – 18 hours or more = full-time 13-17 hours = 3/4-time 9-12 hours = 1/2-time 5-8 hours = less than 1/2-time 1-4 hours = 1/4-time or less VETERANS BENEFITS ADMINISTRATION 22 Clock Hours Shop/Practice Predominates: – – – – – 22 hours or more = full-time 16-21 hours = 3/4-time 11-15 hours = 1/2-time 6-10 hours = less than 1/2-time 1-5 hours = 1/4-time or less 7
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Errors : Timesheet can not be submitted until error is cleared Error Who ? When? Fix This timesheet contains insufficient hours. Budgeted employees’ timesheets must account for all scheduled hours. Enter more work hours or take paid or unpaid time off for the remaining hours. Nonexempt employees • Time entry & in/out nonexempt employees (full time staff only). Employee doesn’t account for 80 hours in the pay period. Total hours for the two week period must equal 80hrs. Enter more work hours or take paid or unpaid time off for the remaining hours. Time overlap Only applies to in and out time reporters Time entered overlaps with previously entered time block Ex. 1st time block: 1:30pm-5pm 2nd time block: 5pm-6pm Check in/out time for 2nd time block must be adjusted. You reported more than 24 hours of work for a single day on . Please correct your time entry Nonexempt, temp, & student employees Total Reported Hours for Day > 24 Correct time to reflect actual time worked. You are not authorized to enter more than 3 instances of 30 minutes each for Wellness Release Time Time entry & in/out nonexempt employees If someone enters more than 3 wellness entries in a week (3 instances of 30 minutes each) Only 3 instances of Wellness Release Time allowed (30 min each) *Note: Students & contingent workers would not receive this errors since they don’t have a built- in work schedule. *Note: Not triggered in pay period when new hire or terminated
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 Librarians are unique when it comes to their leave: they are considered faculty with regards to their leave, however their leave works differently than that of faculty or staff. Although, like faculty, Librarians receive personal leave and are entitled to bank time.  For Librarians, there are a total of 28 FNWD days (210 Hours); this is the 23 during the 9 months plus the 5 for the week of the 4th of July. At the beginning of the Academic Year in August, we take the 210 hours and subtract all the days (hours) the College is closed for the Academic Year. The remaining hours are granted to Librarians as Personal Leave. Of those personal leave hours, in September of each year, HR automatically banks 22.50 hours.  The balance in your FNWD Bank for the current Academic Year will roll over into the new Academic Year. As we move into the new Academic Year, HR will once again take the 28 FNWD (210.00 hours) subtract the hours the College will be closed during that new Academic Year and the remaining balance will be applied to your personal leave. In September we will automatically bank 22.50 of those personal leave hours for you. Please note, any unused personal leave at the end of each Academic Year will be forfeited. Regarding banking time, please note, the maximum amount of personal leave that can be banked during an Academic Year is 37.50 hours. As HR automatically banks 22.50 hours for you each year in September, you can bank up to an additional 15 hours for a total of 37.5 hours. You can bank those additional 15 hours on a FNWD and/or administrative day as identified in the Academic Calendar, so long as the college is open; i.e. you can’t bank time when the College is closed, for example Labor Day.  Time in your FNWD Bank can roll from Academic Year to Academic Year, up to a maximum of 45 days (337.50 hours). LIBRARIANS
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Alerts : Does not prevent employee from submitting time Alert Who ? When? Fix The hours worked and /or time off you have entered exceeds 8 hours in a day. If this is incorrect, please click on the block of time to edit it. Nonexempt employees •Time entry & in/out nonexempt employees. Employee exceeds the scheduled hours in a day. The warning is letting employee know that by exceeding the scheduled hours they could end up with overtime hour. Only a warning/alert- no fix is needed if employee worked over the scheduled time. You have entered time on a holiday. If this is incorrect, please click on the block of time to delete it. If this is correct, you can proceed with submitting your time sheet when all hours have been entered Time entry & in/out nonexempt employees Regular hours are being reported on a day with holiday hours Only a warning/alert- no fix is needed if employee worked on that holiday. International students may only work 20 hours per week while school is in session. You may work more than 20 hours per week during the summer semester, spring break, and winter break. International students Work hours reported exceeds 20hrs during the regular semester Employees must be compensated for any time worked. Contact Norma Lozano in HR (ext. 2198) if you have any questions regarding any possible visa issues. ***Violating these rules can jeopardize your visa status. *** Unmatched time clock event exists: You have a time clock event (Check In) that does not have a matching (Check Out) time clock event. Only applies to in and out time reporters Employee forgot to check out In the Time worklet you can click on Time Clock History to see all Unmatched Clock Events. Clicking on Add Clock Event will allow you to add a Check Out for the appropriate date and time.
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TUTORING REFERRAL WORK FLOW Instructor completes Progress Survey assigning kudos or referral to tutoring. Student attends tutoring Student receives correspondin g email notification. (Future plans) Tutoring is able to view all referrals to their areas real time “Loop” closes after student attends tutoring and faculty receives weekly reports. (Future plans) If student does not visit tutoring, retention staff reaches out to student to assist.
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Campaign Design Worksheet SAMPLE Define a Target Student Population My target student population and rationale for why they require this additional attention: Parameters I will use to create an SSC work list: Mid-career Management majors with borderline GPAs but high risk predictions. They need help to succeed and have time to make significant changes but might fly under the radar.  College/School: Business  Major: Management  Credits Earned: 30 - 60  Cumulative GPA: 2.00 - 2.70 Objectives: This targeted advising campaign will… 1. Contact all identified students at least three times to encourage them to initiate an advising session 2. Schedule an individual advising session with at least 75 percent of  Risk: High Risk  Term Enrollment: Currently Enrolled identified students 3. Connect 50 percent of students with the tutoring center to work on their academic standing Total number of students identified: 45 4. Reduce these students’ risk of stopping out Plan Your Outreach Strategy Action Steps These Students Need to Take:  Seek out academic support services, such as tutoring and study habit workshops  Select and register for courses that match their strengths and in which they have a higher likelihood of success My Communication Plan: Method Email Phone Advising Session My Follow Up Steps: Timing/Frequency Communication Objective and Resources Two times, one week apart during the first half of the semester First: notification of risk status, encourage to make appointment; second: more urgent encouragement, suggest tutoring center before midterms Once in the week after email #2 Discuss resources, why students are at-risk, try to schedule an in-person appointment Once as early in the semester as possible Walk students through notifications, discuss why they are at-risk, maybe even discuss major choice, discuss study habits and time management, plan coursework for next semester  Check with tutoring center to see which students have made appointments  Analyze student risk information one and two semesters after campaign Evaluate Your Campaign Success Metrics and Target Outcomes: Metric Target Percent of population contacted 100% Number of students that complete in-person advising sessions 34 Number of students that make appointments with the tutoring center 23 Number of students that improve their risk level by the end of the following semester 25 ©2014 The Advisory Board Company • eab.com 3 Actual Outcome
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‘Hours Worked’ Continued Travel Time • Travel during the workday – Travel during an employee’s standard work day is considered hours worked. • Travel outside of employee’s standard work day on corresponding hours of non-working days is also hours worked. • During non-work hours, travel time may be considered hours worked as follows: • Passenger - Travel time outside of regular working hours as a passenger on an airplane, train, bus or automobile is not considered hours worked. • Driver - If the employee is driving a vehicle, all travel hours are hours worked regardless of when the travel occurs. Hours worked begins when the employee leaves home and ends when they arrive at the final destination. • Work performed while traveling – Any work that is performed while traveling is considered hours worked. This could include preparing for a meeting, reviewing business documents, making workrelated phone calls, etc. See Travel Time Chart for more detailed assistance - https:// www.uni.edu/hrs/sites/default/files/documents/flsa_travel_chart.pdf Human Resource Services UNI
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VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION SERVICES Assessment services Rehabilitation technology services Independent living evaluation and services Self-employment services Information and referral services Services to family members Interpreter services Substantial counseling and guidance services Job placement services Tools, equipment, initial stocks and supplies Job retention services Training services Maintenance services Transition services Occupational licenses Translation services Personal assistance services Transportation services Physical and mental restoration services Other services Pre-employment Transition Services Post-employment services
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A COMMUNITY NEEDS ASSESSMENT OF HOLOCAUST SURVIVORS Melissa Pullman, PhD1, Wendy Zeitlin, PhD2, Charles Auerbach, PhD1 , Kelly Klinger, BA2 Yeshiva University, New York, New York; 2Montclair State University, Montclair, New Jersey 1 Discussion Unclosable Gaps: Two gaps were identified that would be unable to be closed by traditional resources alone, as they deal with structural problems in society-at-large. Congregate care – skilled nursing facilities and/or assisted living could be helpful for some survivors if there could be a community of survivors that could live together AND appropriate services (including home care for those who live in assisted living facilities) existed. Because this population had been traumatized by institutionalization previously, congregate care generally designed for the elderly, is considered undesirable. As such, without specialized services, it is highly desirable for survivors to remain in their homes in situations which differ from those of other elderly. To date, no such facility has been built in the US, and it is anticipated that this is a need that is not feasible to meet. In-home psychiatric care – while numerous research participants indicated that this service is needed, there are an insufficient number of psychiatrists nationwide, and the need for psychiatric care, in general, is growing for all populations. It is not likely that this gap will be closed any time as the number of psychiatrists retiring continues to rise, and the number of residency spots for new psychiatrists is held steady. www.eposterboards.com Discussion (cont.) Existing services: Professional Social Work Services - includes services such as case management, clinical social work, mental health counseling, friendly visiting, financial guardianship, and social programs. In short, social work services include all services that would include direct services provided by licensed social workers and those overseen by licensed social workers. Services such as social work/case management are not adequately funded currently. One participant stated the need for these services clearly: The social worker helps them [survivors] to get hooked up to services they are resistant to or helps them through the barriers. They help them think about what their needs are. It is hard to get through the door and win their trust. On- on-one service is very expensive. Home Care - includes services such as housekeeping, companionship, in-home nursing and home health aides. There was unanimous agreement that one of the most import factors in preserving the dignity of survivors is the ability to remain at home. An important theme, more knowledge about survivors to the home health aides, emerged from the data. Specialized home care services were addressed by one participant: Aides are trained to understand the history and special needs of the survivors. For example, even knowing that chemical smells can trigger memories for the client. Transportation - includes door-to-door transportation to both medical appointments and social events designed for Holocaust survivors. While underfunded, participants agreed that this service was needed to help survivors remain in their homes and maintain their dignity: Survivors need transportation, otherwise they can’t access the city services. Food support - includes Meals-On-Wheels and additional supplementary support for food, including grocery store vouchers. Having abundant food was an important issue to survivors, who often hoard because they are afraid food will run out. One provider commented on the importance of food in keeping survivors in the community. Another noted the needed for Meals-On-Wheels: Food stamps don’t fulfill food for a whole week; some can’t go to the grocery store, so they need already made meals. Emergency Cash Assistance - The German government currently provides a limited amount of emergency cash to survivors for one-time expenses. This is similar to a small business’s “petty cash.” This is currently used for a wide range of expenses, some of which are actually long-term needs. Examples of how emergency cash is used includes: rent, utility bill, durable medical equipment such as hearing aids or hospital beds, and dental bills. One interviewee noted how this is often insufficient: It is not a generous enough cap for the survivors to maintain their dignity.… basic needs aren’t even met, capped at $2,500 is too little. Sometimes they are in the middle of their medical/dental work and they don’t know what to do when the $2,500 runs out. Conclusion and Implications While it is unlikely that some needs identified in this research will be able to be met in survivors’ lifetimes, many could. While most services identified in this research currently exist, all service providers indicated that inadequate funding make it likely that an increasing number of survivors’ needs will go unmet in the future. The population of Holocaust survivors is aging with the youngest being in their 70s. Research indicates that this population is expected to be reduced by 74% within 15 years (SSRS, 2016); however, the needs of the existing survivors will increase as they age. This will likely put a strain on survivors, their families, and the communities in which they live. Future research should focus on how to best expand and fund services for Holocaust survivors as they continue to age. References Cohen, S. M., Ukeles, J. B., & Miller, R. (2012). Jewish community study of New York: 2011 comprehensive report. New York: UJA Federation of New York. Eriksson, M., Räikkönen, K., & Eriksson, J. G. (2014). Early life stress and later health outcomes—findings from the Helsinki Birth Cohort Study. American Journal of Human Biology, 26(2), 111–116. Keinan-Boker, L., Shasha-Lavsky, H., Eilat-Zanani, S., Edri-Shur, A., & Shasha, S. M. (2015). Chronic health conditions in Jewish Holocaust survivors born during World War II. The Israel Medical Association Journal: IMAJ, 17(4), 206–212. Meyer, M. H., & Daniele, E. A. (2016). Gerontology: Changes, Challenges, and Solutions [2 volumes]: Changes, Challenges, and Solutions. ABC-CLIO. Mitka, M. (2014). Holocaust survivors’ health needs. JAMA, 311(10), 1005. SSRS. (2016). Gap analysis of services to holocaust survivors in New York City, Westchester, and Long Island. Media, PA: Author. Funding for this study was provided by UJA-Federation of New York
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Suggested Distribution of Total Counselor Time Elementary Middle High Guidance Curriculum 35-45 % 7-9 hours per week 25-35 % 5-7 hours per week 15-25 % 3-5 hours per week Individual Planning 5-10 % 1-2 hour per week 15-25 % 2-5 hours per week 25-35 % 5-7 hours per week Responsive Services 30-40 % 6-8 hours per week 30-40 % 6-8 hours per week 25-35 % 5-7 hours per week System Support 10-15 % 2-3 hours per week 10-15 % 2-3 hours per week 15-20 % 3-4 hours per week Total 100 % 20 Hours 100 % 20 Hours 100 % 20 Hours
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Time Budget  Class Time:  2 x 3 hour classes (6 cr) 2 x 6 hour classes (8 cr) = 6 class hours = 12 class hours (2 Lab Science Classes) = 18 class hours = 36 study hours 54 UMF hours!   Homework:          Weekly Time Budget: Total Hours Per Week Sleep (7 hours/night) Conscious UMF Commitment Your "Other Life" (Eat, Work, Play) = 168 hours (Absolute) = -49 hours (Minimum Suggested) = 119 hours (Hypothetical Average) -54 hours (Absolute Minimum) = 65 hours (Hypothetical Average) NOT BAD! SHOW THIS TO YOUR PARENTS, SPOUSE, KIDS, BOSS
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Schedule with Time Patterns Proposed Morning Classes Time Patterns for a Trade Tech (16 1/2-Week) Calendar 3-Hour Class 2 days/week (85 min/session) A MW 7:00-8:25 TTh 7:00-8:25 B 8:35-10:00 8:35-10:00 C 10:10-11:35 10:10-11:35 21 Hour Block Programs ADD 1/2 Hour per Day M-F Lab 7:00-10:15 (Lec or Lab may come first) M-Th Lec 10:25-11:50 1 day/wk F 7:00-10:10 10:20-1:30 OR 4-Hour Class 3 days/week (75 min/session) MTWTh 7:00-8:10 MWF 7:00-8:20 MW 7:00-9:10 F TThF 7:00-8:20 TTh 7:00-9:10 F MTWTh 7:00-8:25 8:35-9:50 8:35-9:50 8:35-9:45 8:35-9:55 MW 8:35-10:45 F 8:35-9:55 MW 8:35-10:45 F 8:35-10:00 10:10-11:25 10:10-11:25 10:10-11:20 11:35-12:50 11:35-12:51 E 1:25-2:50 1:00-2:15 class-free "hour" 1:15-3:00 F 3:00-4:25 class-free "hour" 1:15-3:00 3:00-4:25 X Y 6:00-9:10 6:20-7:45 7:55-9:10 10:10-11:30 MW 10:10-11:30 TTh 9:20-11:30 F 9:20-11:30 F 10:10-11:35 Each Discipline (Block Program) may establish any other scheduling pattern, provided that it is 23.6 hours/week and meets unique student and program needs. 11:45-1:10 W 6-Hour Class 4 days/week (85 min/mtg) TThF 7:00-8:15 11:45-1:10 3-Hour Class 1 eve/week 2 eve/week (190 min/mtg) (85 min/mtg MW or TTh 4:35-7:45 4:45-6:10 5-Hour Class 3 days/week (MW 80 min/mtg; F 130 min/mtg) MWF 7:00-8:15 Afternoon Classes D Evening Classes 4 days/week (70 min/mtg) #6 3:00-4:25 4-Hour Class 2 eve/week 125 min/mtg MW or TTh 4:30-6:35 5-Hour Class 2 eve/week 150 min/mtg MW or TTh 4:05-6:35 6:45-8:50 6:45-9:15 11:45-12:55 (95 min/mtg) 11:45-1:20 MWF 3:00-4:25 3:00-4:25 MWF (95 min/mtg) 1:30-3:05 TTh 12:30-2:05 F 11:45-1:10 3:00-4:25 Large Time Blocks (Lab & Activity Classes) Base Calendar Red Calendar Sample Times (18-Week) (15-Week) (10 min breaks) 2 hours 2.3 hours 8:00-10:05 (125 min) (one break) 2.5 hours 2.8 hours 8:00-10:30 (150 min) (one break) 3 hours 3.4 hours 8:00-11:10 (190 min) (two breaks) 4 hours 4.5 hours 8:00-12:15 (255 min) (three breaks) 5 hours 5.6 hours 8:00-1:20 (320 min) (four breaks) 6 hours 6.5 hours 8:00-2:30 (390 min) (five breaks)
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Introduction to the new mainframe Running Multiple Instances of Products across z/OS Partitons LPAR “A” LPAR “B” “A” – “B” T O R T O R T O R T O R AOR AOR FOR DM Manager Region “B” – “C” Servant Region 3 Servant Region 2 Servant Region 1 (SR) AOR Daemon Region AOR AOR FOR AOR DM Agent Servant Region 3 Servant Region 2 Servant Region 1 (SR) Controller Region (CR) Daemon Region T O R T O R DM Manager Region AOR AOR AOR FOR Controller Region (CR) Daemon Region System Services DM Agent Controller Region (CR) DM Manager Region LPAR “C” DM Agent Servant Region 3 Servant Region 2 Servant Region 1 (SR) Lock Mgr. Services System Services Lock Mgr. Services System Services Lock Mgr. Services Stored Database Procedures Services Stored Services Procedures Services Stored Procedures Services Distrib. Database Services Stored Database Procedures Services Stored Services Procedures Services Stored Procedures Services Distrib. Database Services Stored Database Procedures Services Stored Services Procedures Services Stored Procedures Services Distrib. Database Services © Copyright IBM Corp., 2010. All rights reserved. S Y S P L E X Page 62 of 85
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Introduction to the new mainframe Running Multiple Mixed Instances of Products across z/OS Servers LPAR “A” T O R LPAR “B” DM Manager Region AOR AOR T O R FOR AOR DM Agent Servant Region 3 Servant Region 2 Servant Region 1 (SR) Controller Region (CR) Controller Region (CR) Daemon Region System Services Lock Mgr. Services Servant Region 3 Servant Region 2 Servant Region 1 (SR) Stored Database Procedures Services Stored Services Procedures Services Stored Procedures Services Distrib. Database Services T O R T O R System Services Lock Mgr. Services System Services DM Agent Daemon Region DM Manager Region LPAR “C” T O R AOR AOR Lock Mgr. Services Stored Database Procedures Services Stored Services Procedures Services Stored Procedures Services Distrib. Database Services FOR AOR Stored Database Procedures Services Stored Services Procedures Services Stored Procedures Services Distrib. Database Services T O R DM Manager Region AOR AOR FOR AOR DM Agent Controller Region (CR) Daemon Region © Copyright IBM Corp., 2010. All rights reserved. Servant Region 3 Servant Region 2 Servant Region 1 (SR) Page 63 of 85
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A. S. Degree - 9 credit hours of Communications - 3 credit hours of Mathematics -10 credit hours of Life and Physical Science - 9 credit hours of Humanities and Fine Arts - 6 credit hours of Global Appreciation (can be fulfilled by completing appropriate courses in other general education categories) - 9 credit hours of Social and Behavioral Sciences - 2 credit hours of Health and Wellness A.A. Degree - 9 credit hours of Communications - 3 credit hours of Mathematics - 7 credit hours of Life and Physical Science - 12 credit hours of Humanities and Fine Arts - 6 credit hours of Global Appreciation (can be fulfilled by completing appropriate courses in other general education categories) - 9 credit hours of Social and Behavioral Sciences - 2 credit hours of Health and Wellness back | home | next
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Academic Resource Comparison Continued… SIUE Northern Kentucky (Division II) Univ of Indianapolis (Division II) Number of Athletes 285 (16 teams) 225 250 Academic Support Personnel Academic Advisor for Athletics (who is also Compliance Coordinator Academic Advisor for Athletics – also works in conjunction with general advising office Academic Advisor for Athletics, .5 time Graduate Assistant Facilities for Academic Support No computer lab/study room for studentathletes. Coaches must find space for study tables. Tutors must find space to hold individual tutoring appointments. Coaches often have students in the VC to study, but no computers/space is readily available. Dedicated room with 8 desktop computers and study area with large tables. They are also a wireless campus and have 4 laptops that students can check out to use. Small room with tables and wireless capability for studying during the day. Classroom (in their building) is reserved 3 nights/wk for large study tables. 10 laptops students can use (100% wireless campus). Study tables are run by GA. Grad Rate 69% 62% 62% Financial Resources for Academic Support $3500 per year tutoring budget ($8.50 per hour). Ave. tutor hrs per week=15 They have a centralized tutoring office on campus that athletes use. Indiv. tutoring is utilized in select cases. They have a centralized tutoring office on campus that athletes use. Indiv. tutoring is utilized in
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Budget Services Supplies & Software Project Manager Esri ArcGIS Hours: 100 Work hours over 20 days Hourly Rate: $40 Sub-Total: $4000 Hours Used: 100 Work hours over 20 days Hourly Rate for Subscription: $5.71 Sub-Total: $571 Assistant Project Manager (5) Workstations Hours: 100 Work hours over 20 days Hourly Rate: $36 Sub-Total: $3600 Graphic Designer & Researcher Hours: 100 Work hours over 20 days Hourly Rate: $26 Sub-Total: $2600 GIS Specialist & Researcher Hours: 100 Work hours over 20 days Hourly Rate: $29 2.5 Months Rent per Station: $150 Sub-Total: $750 (5) Depreciation of Computers 2.5 Months Rent per Computer: $138 Transportation Sub-Total: $690 60 Mile Trip 2 Trips 55 cents per Mile: $33 Sub-Total: $2900 Sub-Total: $66 Editor & Researcher Supplies & Software SubTotal: $2,077 Hours: 100 Work hours over 20 days Hourly Rate: $30 Sub-Total: $3000 Services SubTotal: $16,100 Total Cost:
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Design TA Time Commitment TA Student Load Hourly Breakdown 10 hrs/week 1 section 38 students max Hrs in class/week = 3 Office Hours = 1 Resource Room Hours = 1 Weekly Meeting = 1 Scheduled time total = 6 hrs Open time = 4 hrs 15 hrs/week 2 sections 76 students max Hrs in class/week = 6 Office Hours = 1 Resource Room Hours = 1 Weekly Meeting = 1 Scheduled time total = 9 hrs Open time = 6 hrs 20 hrs/week 3 sections 114 students max Hrs in class/week = 9 Office Hours = 1 Resource Room Hours = 1 Weekly Meeting = 1 Scheduled time total = 12 hrs Open time = 8 hrs A D D I E
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