Math & Nature  Geometry & Biology ◦ CCSS  MACC.912.G-GMD.1.3 Use volume formulas for cylinders, pyramids, cones and spheres to solve problems.  MACC.912.G-GMD.2.4 Identify the shapes of twodimensional cross-sections of three-dimensional objects, and identify three-dimensional objects generated by rotations of two-dimensional objects.
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Math & Nature  Geometry & Biology ◦ CCSS  MACC.912.G-GMD.1.3: Use volume formulas for cylinders, pyramids, cones, and spheres to solve problems.  MACC.912.G-GMD.2.4: Identify the shapes of twodimensional cross-sections of three-dimensional objects, and identify three-dimensional objects generated by rotations of two-dimensional objects.
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Math & Nature  Geometry & Biology ◦ CCSS  G.GMD.3 Use volume formulas for cylinders, pyramids, cones, and spheres to solve problems.  G.GMD.4 Identify the shapes of two-dimensional cross-sections of three-dimensional objects, and identify three-dimensional objects generated by rotations of two-dimensional objects.
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CCSS-Math Coherence with Functions CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.6.EE.C.9 Grade 6 Use variables to represent two quantities in a real-world problem that change in relationship to one another; write an equation to express one quantity, thought of as the dependent variable, in terms of the other quantity, thought of as the independent variable…. CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.7.RP.A.2.C Grade 7 Represent proportional relationships by equations. For example, if total cost t is proportional to the number n of items purchased at a constant price p, the relationship between the total cost and the number of items can be expressed as t = pn. CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.8.F.B.4 Grade 8 HS Construct a function to model a linear relationship between two quantities. Determine the rate of change and initial value of the function from a description of a relationship or from two (x, y) values, including reading these from a table or from a graph. Interpret the rate of change and initial value of a linear function in terms of the situation it models, and in terms of its graph or a table of values. Construct and compare linear, quadratic, and exponential models and solve problems. CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.HSF.LE.A.1 Distinguish between situations that can be modeled with linear functions and with exponential functions.
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Math & Nature  Geometry & Biology ◦ CCSS  MACC.912.G-MG.1.1 Use geometric shapes, their measures, and their properties to describe objects (e.g. modeling a tree trunk or a human torso as a cylinder.)  MACC.912.G-SRT.2.5 Use congruence and similarity criteria for triangles to solve problems and to prove relationships in geometric figures.
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Math & Nature  Geometry & Biology ◦ CCSS  MACC.912.G-MG.1.1: Use geometric shapes, their measures, and their properties to describe objects (e.g., modeling a tree trunk or a human torso as a cylinder).  MACC.K12.MP.1.1: Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.  MACC.K12.MP.4.1: Model with mathematics
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Example: Foundational Degree Requirements Communication - Oral: Recognize, send, and respond to communications for varied audiences both as speaker and listener. (LEAP Communication) (State Board Core, Communication) (HS Language Arts - Speech) Complete 3 credits ____ COMM 101 Critical/Creative Thinking and Problem Solving: Engage and demonstrate the ability to analyze and evaluate information and arguments; select or design appropriate frameworks and strategies to solve problems in multiple contexts individually and collaboratively. (LEAP Critical and Creative thinking) (Across the curriculum) (HS Humanities/Fine Arts/Interdisciplinary) Complete 3 credits. ____ ENGL 175 Introduction to Literature 3 ____ ENGL 257 Literature of Western Civilization 3 ____ ENGL 258 Literature of Western Civilization 3 ____ ENGL 267 Survey of English Literature 3 ____ ENGL 268 Survey of English Literature 3 ____ ENGL 271 Introduction to Shakespeare 3 (300 L) ____ ENGL 277 Survey of American Literature 3 (300 L) ____ ENGL 278 Survey of American Literature 3 ____ ENGL 285 American Indian Literature 3 (400 L) ____ ENGL 295 Contemp. U.S. Multicultural Literature 3 ____ FLAN 207 Contemporary World Culture 3 ____ INTR 200 Interdisciplinary Seminar 3 ____ PHIL 201 Logic and Critical Thinking 3 Communication – Written: Recognize, send, and respond to written communications for varied audiences as both writer and reader. (LEAP Communication and LEAP Information Literacy) (State Board Core, English Comp) (HS Language Arts - English) Complete 6 credits ____ ENGL 101 ____ ENGL 102 Mathematical and Symbolic Reasoning: Apply mathematical reasoning to investigate and solve problems. (LEAP Quantitative Literacy). (State Board Core, Mathematics) (HS Mathematics) Complete 3-4 credits ____ MATH 123 Contemporary Mathematics 3 ____ MATH 130 Finite Mathematics 4 ____ MATH 143 College Algebra 3 ____ MATH 144 Analytic Trigonometry 2 ____ MATH 147 Pre-Calculus 5 ____ MATH 160 Survey of Calculus 4 ____ MATH 170 Analytic Geometry & Calculus I 4 ____ MATH 175 Analytic Geometry & Calculus II 4 ____ MATH 187 Discrete Mathematics 4 ____ MATH 253 Principles of Applied Statistics 3 ____ MATH 275 Analytic Geometry & Calculus III 4
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PLACEMENT HOW? Placement Placement Test Test Transfer Transfer Credits Credits SAT SAT or or ACT ACT Scores Scores High High School School AP AP Scores Scores (Mathematics) (Mathematics) WHAT TO DO? Take Take placement placement test test on on any any campus campus at at Testing Testing Center. Center. Accuplacer Accuplacer MATH MATH can can be be taken taken twice. twice. Students Students who who wish wish higher higher placement placement must must then then “appeal”. “appeal”. Appeal Appeal is is request to take a pencil-and-paper type test on material from the course they request to take a pencil-and-paper type test on material from the course they placed placed into. into. Bring Bring transcript transcript showing showing general general education education math math credits credits from from another another college college or or university university to to CCBC CCBC for for evaluation. evaluation. If If completed completed in in Maryland, Maryland, the the highest highest level level developmental math course, Intermediate Algebra can be used for placement. developmental math course, Intermediate Algebra can be used for placement. Placement Placement by by SAT SAT MATH MATH score score of of 500 500 or or higher higher (or (or by by ACT ACT MATH MATH score score 21 21 or or higher) places the student into an entry-level general education math course higher) places the student into an entry-level general education math course (MATH (MATH 111, 111, 125, 125, 131/2/3, 131/2/3, 135, 135, 163). 163). For For higher higher placement, placement, the the student student must must take take Accuplacer MATH. MATH. Accuplacer Students Students with with documentation documentation of of AP AP math math scores scores of of 3, 3, 4, 4, or or 5 5 from from high high school school can can be awarded college credit and placement according to this chart. be awarded college credit and placement according to this chart.
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Core Math MATH 95 MATH 96 MATH 126 MATH 176 MATH 96 MATH 126 MATH 176 MATH 126E MATH 176 Recommendation: If you start in Math 95 or Math 96 take summer classes to stay on track! MATH 126 MATH 176 MATH 181 or Math 182 will meet the College of Business math requirement. MATH 176 Pg. 12 of your Advising Manual
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Rounding Methods Examples Math.ceil(2.1) returns 3.0 Math.ceil(2.0) returns 2.0 Math.ceil(-2.0) returns –2.0 Math.ceil(-2.1) returns -2.0 Math.floor(2.1) returns 2.0 Math.floor(2.0) returns 2.0 Math.floor(-2.0) returns –2.0 Math.floor(-2.1) returns -3.0 Math.rint(2.1) returns 2.0 Math.rint(2.0) returns 2.0 Math.rint(-2.0) returns –2.0 Math.rint(-2.1) returns -2.0 Math.rint(2.5) returns 2.0 Math.rint(-2.5) returns -2.0 Math.round(2.6f) returns 3 Math.round(2.0) returns 2 Math.round(-2.0f) returns -2 Math.round(-2.6) returns -3 8
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Standards Addressed In Lesson MACC.912.G-SRT.3.6: Understand that by similarity, side ratios in right triangles are properties of the angles in the triangle, leading to definitions of trigonometric ratios for acute angles. MACC.912.G-SRT.3.7: Explain and use the relationship between the sine and cosine of complementary angles. MACC.912.G-SRT.3.8: Use trigonometric ratios and the Pythagorean Theorem to solve right triangles in applied problems.
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Math & Nature  Geometry & Biology ◦ CCSS  MACC.912.G-SRT.3.8 Use trigonometric ratios and the Pythagorean Theorem to solve right triangles in applied problems.  MACC.K12.MP.4.1 Model with mathematics
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Figure 9 Markets Not in Equilibrium Price of Ice-Cream Cones (a) Excess Supply Surplus Supply Price of Ice-Cream Cones (b) Excess demand Supply $2.50 2.00 $2.00 Demand 1.50 Demand Shortage Quantity demanded 0 Quantity supplied 4 7 10 Quantity of Ice-Cream Cones Quantity supplied 0 Quantity demanded 4 7 10 Quantity of Ice-Cream Cones In panel (a), there is a surplus. Because the market price of $2.50 is above the equilibrium price, the quantity supplied (10 cones) exceeds the quantity demanded (4 cones). Suppliers try to increase sales by cutting the price of a cone, and this moves the price toward its equilibrium level. In panel (b), there is a shortage. Because the market price of $1.50 is below the equilibrium price, the quantity demanded (10 cones) exceeds the quantity supplied (4 cones). With too many buyers chasing too few goods, suppliers can take advantage of the shortage by raising the price. Hence, in both cases, the price adjustment moves the market toward the equilibrium of supply and demand © 2011 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part, except for use as permitted in a license distributed with a certain product or service or otherwise on a password-protected website for classroom use. 35
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Math & Nature  Geometry & Biology ◦ Geometry Objectives  MA.912.G.7.5 – Explain and use formulas for lateral area, surface area, and volume of solids  MA.912.G.4.4 – Use properties of congruent and similar triangles to solve problems involving lengths and areas  MA.912.G.1.3 – Identify and use the relationships between special pairs of angles formed by parallel lines and transversals
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Math & Nature  Geometry & Biology ◦ NGSSS  MA.912.G.4.4 Use properties of congruent and similar triangles to solve problems involving lengths and areas.  MA.912.G.5.3 Use special right triangles (30⁰-60-90⁰ and 45⁰- 45⁰-90⁰) to solve problems.  MA.912.G.7.5 Explain and use formulas for lateral area, surface area, and volume of solids.
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Math Study Skills Inventory Rate your achievement of the following statements by placing a 3 for almost always, 2 for sometimes, and 1 for almost never. If you have never even thought about doing what the statement says, put a 0. Selecting a math class _______ 1. I schedule my math class at a time when I am mentally sharp. _______ 2. When I register for a math class, I choose the best instructor for me. _______ 3. If I have a choice, I select a math class that meets three or four days a week instead of one or two. _______ 4. I schedule the next math class as soon as possible after I have completed the current course. _______ 5. I am sure that I have signed up for the correct level math course.  Time and place for studying math _______ 6. I study math every day. _______ 7. I try to get my math homework immediately after math class. _______ 8. I have a specific time to study math. _______ 9. I have a specific place with few distractions to study math. ______ 10. I seek help with my math homework in the lab/tutoring center. ______ 11. I am careful to keep up to date with math homework. ______ 12. I study math at least 8 to 10 hours a week. 
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Math & Nature  Geometry & Biology ◦ NGSSS  MA.912.G.4.4: Use properties of congruent and similar triangles to solve problems involving lengths and area.  MA.912.G.5.4: Solve real-world problems involving right triangles.  MA.912.G.7.5: Explain and use formulas for lateral area, surface area, and volume of solids.
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Coherence within Grade 8 The standards make explicit connections at a single grade CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.8.EE.B.5 Graph proportional relationships, interpreting the unit rate as the slope of the graph. Compare two different proportional relationships represented in different ways. For example, compare a distance-time graph to a distance-time equation to determine which of two moving objects has greater speed. CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.8.SP.A.3 Use the equation of a linear model to solve problems in the context of bivariate measurement data, interpreting the slope and intercept. For example, in a linear model for a biology experiment, interpret a slope of 1.5 cm/hr as meaning that an additional hour of sunlight each day is associated with an additional 1.5 cm in mature plant height. CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.8.F.B.4 Construct a function to model a linear relationship between two quantities. Determine the rate of change and initial value of the function from a description of a relationship or from two (x, y) values, including reading these from a table or from a graph. Interpret the rate of change and initial value of a linear function in terms of the situation it models, and in terms of its graph or a table of values.
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Seismic attribute-assisted interpretation of incised valley fill episodes: A case study of Anadarko Basin Red Fork interval. Yoscel Suarez*, Chesapeake Energy and The University of Oklahoma, USA Kurt J. Marfurt, The University of Oklahoma, USA Mark Falk, Chesapeake Energy, USA Al Warner , Chesapeake Energy, USA Abstract Previous Work Discrimination of valley-fill episodes and their lithology has always posed a challenge for exploration geologists and geophysicists, and the Red Fork sands in the Anadarko Basin do not fall outside of this challenge. The goal of this study is to take a new look at seismic attributes given the considerable well control that has been acquired during the past decade. By using this well understood reservoir as a natural laboratory, we calibrate the response of various attributes to a well-understood incised valley system. The extensive drilling program shows that seismic data has difficulty in distinguishing shale episodes vs. sand episodes, where the ultimate exploration goal is to find productive valley fill sands. In 1998 Lynn Peyton, Rich Bottjer and Greg Partyka published a paper in the Leading Edge describing their use of coherency and spectral decomposition to identify valley fill in the Red Fork interval in the Anadarko Basin. Their work help them identify five valley-fill sequences in order to find optimum reservoir intervals and to reduce exploration risk . Due to the discontinuity of the valley-fill episodes the mapping of such events by using conventional seismic displays is extremely challenging. Figure 3 shows one of the stratigraphic well cross-section presented by Peyton et al where the discontinuities of this complex are evident. Figure 4 shows a seismic profile that parallels the wells cross-section highlighting the same stages. The seismic section is flattened in the Novi. Since original work done in 1998 both seismic attributes and seismic geomorphology have undergone rapid advancement. The findings of this work will be applicable to nearby active areas as well as other intervals in the area that exhibit the same challenges. Using Peyton et al’s (1998) work as a starting point we generated similar displays of conventional seismic profiles and well x-sections that will become the bases of our research efforts. Figure 8 shows the geometry and extents of the different episodes of the Red Fork incised valley system based on well data interpretation and conventional seismic displays. This map will be compared to the different seismic attributes to calibrate their response. Figure 9 (a,b) show couple of well x-sections and their corresponding seismic profiles that supported the valley-fill stages map in Figure 8. Seismic attributes have undergone rapid development since the mid 1990s. In lieu of the horizon-based spectral decomposition based on the discrete Fourier transform, we use volumetric-based spectral decomposition based on matched pursuit and wavelet transforms (e.g. Liu and Marfurt,2007) . Other edge-sensitive attributes include more modern implementations of coherence, long-wavelength Sobel filters, and amplitude gradients. Figure 10 shows a horizon slice at the Red Fork level. Note that on conventional data the channel complex is identifiable. However, the use of seismic attributes may help delineate in more detail the different episodes within the same fluvial system and better define channel geomorphology. We will compare different edge detection algorithms and the advantages and disadvantages that each of them provides to the interpreter. Also, matching pursuit spectral decomposition results will be presented as well as combinations of Relative Acoustic Impedance and semblance that provide helpful information in the interpretation of this dataset. The surveys are located in west central Oklahoma. They were shot by Amoco from 19931996 and later merged into a 136 sq.mi. survey. In 1998, Chesapeake acquired many of Amoco’s Mid-continent properties including those discussed by Peyton et al. (1998). In this study we present alternative seismic attribute-assisted interpretation workflows that show the potential information that each of the geometric and amplitude-based attributes offer to the interpreter when dealing with Red Fork valley-fill episodes in the Anadarko Basin. It is important to mention that one of the biggest challenges of this dataset is the acquisition footprint, which contaminates the data and limits the resolution of some of the seismic attributes. Geological Framework Methodology A Figure 3. Stratigraphic cross-section Red Fork valley –fill complex Figure 4. Seismic profile associated to the prior crosssection. Flattened in the Novi interval By generating horizon slices in the coherency volume they were able to identify and delineate the main geometries of the incised valley (Figure 5). The event used to generated the horizon slice is the Skinner Lime above the Red Fork interval. A’ The Pennsylvanian incised valley sequence associated with the Red Fork interval has, throughout most of its extent, three major events or facies (Phase I, II, and III) which can be differentiated by log signatures, production characteristics, and gross geometry. Two additional events (Phase IV and V) are present in the eastern and northeastern headward portion of the valley, also recognizable by log signature and gross geometry. Phase II Phase III Phase V Figure 8. Red Fork incised valley geometries and valley-fill episodes The multi phase events of the Upper Red Fork Valley system were most likely caused by repeated sea level changes resulting from Pennsylvania glacial events that were probably related to the Milankovitch astronomical cycles including the changing tilt of the earth’s axis and eccentricity of the earth’s elliptical orbit. Phase I is the earliest valley event and Phase II generally has a much wider represents the narrow, initial downcutting of the valley sequence. Where present (a considerable portion of Phase I has been eroded by later events), the rocks are generally poorly correlative shales, silts, and tight sandstones overlying a basal “lag” deposit. areal distribution (up to four miles) with a variety of valley fill facies deposited which record a period of valley widening and maturation. Logs over Phase II rocks illustrate a classic fining upward pattern and shale resistivities of 10 or more ohms. Phase III rocks record the last major incisement within the valley and occur within a narrow (0.25-.05 mile wide) steep walled system that is correlative for 70 miles. This rejuvenated channel actually represents the final position of the Phase II river before base level was lowered and renewed downcutting began. Phase III reservoirs are primarily thick, blocky, porous sands at the base of the sequence that have been backfilled, reworked, and overlain by low resistivity marine shales deposited by a major transgression which drowned the valley sequence. Figure 5. Coherency horizon slice at the Red Fork level Phase V the last event before the transgression that deposited the Pink. It’s primary significance is that it either partially or completely eroded much of the Phase III Valley event. Phase V rocks are poorly developed, non productive sand and shales which also have a characteristic log signature. end of Phase III marine shale deposition. Phase IV rocks are characterized by thin, tight, interbedded sands and shales with a coal or coaly shale near the base. This facies is interpreted as an elongated lagoon/ coal swamp or possibly bay head delta as it often extends beyond the confines of the deeper valley. The Induction log signature is a very distinct “serrated” pattern with a “hot” gamma ray near the base identifying the coal or coaly shale. Pink Lime In their workflow they also estimated the spectral decomposition. They found that the 36 Hz component best represented the different valley-fill stages (Figure 6). By combining the well-data with the information from the seismic attributes they were able to delineate the extents of the different valley –fill episodes (Figure 7) and generate and integrated interpretation of the system. Lower Red Fork II III II Middle Red Fork V a) Figure 9. a) Red Fork stratigraphic cross-section. b) Seismic profile showing the stratigraphic interpretation derived from the well data Phase IV records a modest regression at the The geological framework summary is courtesy of Al Warner. Senior Geologist at Chesapeake Energy Figure 10. Conventional seismic horizon slice at the Red Fork level. The channel discernible although signal/noise ratio is affected by acquisition footprint Figure 6. Spectral decomposition (36 Hz) horizon slice at the Red Fork level Figure 7. Spectral decomposition (36 Hz) horizon slice at the Red Fork level with interpretation. III b) II V
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Spring 2014 Pilot Results – Artifact Collection Strategies • Each of the four skill areas will strive to collect and assess artifacts from 85 sections: – – – – – – 13 sections of ENG:101 (Communicating), approx. 320 6 sections of COM:101 (Communicating), approx. 140 6 sections of COM:107(Communicating), approx. 140 20 sections of ENG:102 (Managing Information), approx. 400 20 sections of G/I designated courses (Valuing), approx. 400 20 sections of IDS courses (Higher Order Thinking), approx. 400 • Each of the five knowledge areas will strive to collect and assess a proportional number of artifacts based upon the number of credits they represent within Gen Ed. from the remaining 85 sections. – – – – – – 24 sections, approx. 480 from Social & Behavioral Sciences (9 out of 32 credit hours, 28%) 24 sections, approx. 480 from Humanities & Fine Arts (9 out of 32 credit hours, 28%) 18 sections, approx. 360 from Life & Physical Sciences (7 out of 32 credit hours, 22%) 10 sections, approx. 300 from Mathematics (4 out of 32 credit hours, 12%) 8 sections, approx. 160 from Interdisciplinary Studies (3 out of 32, 10%) 8 sections, approx. 160 from Global Intercultural (3 out of 32, 10%)
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Curricular Map Courses & Rotations Semester 1 (First Summer) FACS 5315 Nutrition Services Practicum I (3 hours) & Foodservice Rotations FACS 5316 Nutrition Services Practicum II (3 hours) & Foodservice Rotations FACS 5317 Community Nutrition Practicum (3 hours) & Community Rotations FACS 5321 Nutrition Services Administration (3 hours) & Management Rotations Semester 2 (Fall) FACS 5324 Nutritional Assessment (3 hours) Research Rotation Community / Public Health Rotations Semester 3 (Spring) NUTR 6335 Nutrition Counseling (3 hours) & Wellness Rotations LTC Rotation Community Rotations Public Policy Rotation Semester 4 (Second Summer) FACS 5318 Clinical Nutrition Practicum  (3 hours)                     FACS 6313 Diet Therapy  (3 hours)   & Acute Care Rotations                                                    C R D 1. 1   C R D 1. 2   C R D 1. 3   C R D 1. 4   C R D 1. 5   X                       C R D 2. 1   C R D 2. 2   C R D 2. 3   C R D 2. 4   C R D 2. 5   C R D 2. 6   C R D 2. 7   C R D 2. 8   C R D 2. 9   C R D 2. 10   C R D 2. 11   C R D 2. 12   C R D 2. 13         X     X     X                   X     X     X           X       X X     X   X X X                     X X   X     X     X   X                                                     X     X     X             X   X X           X     X               X       X X X X X   X X X   X   X                                                     X X X X   X X                             X                               X       X       X       X       X               X       X       X               X               X     X X           X     X     X       X   X X         X X X X X X X X   X X   X
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Curricular Map Courses & Rotations Semester 1 (First Summer) FACS 5315 Nutrition Services Practicum I (3 hours) & Foodservice Rotations FACS 5316 Nutrition Services Practicum II (3 hours) & Foodservice Rotations FACS 5317 Community Nutrition Practicum (3 hours) & Community Rotations FACS 5321 Nutrition Services Administration (3 hours) & Management Rotations Semester 2 (Fall) FACS 5324 Nutritional Assessment (3 hours) Research Rotation Community / Public Health Rotations Semester 3 (Spring) NUTR 6335 Nutrition Counseling (3 hours) & Wellness Rotations LTC Rotation Community Rotations Public Policy Rotation Semester 4 (Second Summer) FACS 5318 Clinical Nutrition Practicum  (3 hours)                     FACS 6313 Diet Therapy  (3 hours)   & Acute Care Rotations                                                    C R D 3. 1 C R D 3. 1. a C R D 3. 1. b C R D 3. 1. c C R D 3. 1. d C R D 3. 1. e C R D 3. 2 C R D 3. 3 C R D 3. 4 C R D 3. 5 C R D 3. 6                                   X     X             X                 X               X                             X             X           X                                         X X C R D 4. 1 C R D 4. 2 C R D 4. 3 C R D 4. 4 C R D 4. 5 C R D 4. 6 C R D 4. 7 C R D 4. 8 C R D 4. 9 C R D 4. 10 C R D 4. 11                         X     X                   X X     X                                                   X X   X X   X X X X X X X       X X                                                         X               X X X         X X X                                                                       X   X                                           X   X X     X     X                                     X                                                                                           X X X X X X           X                   X X X X X X X X X       X     X X X X X X X X  
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