In Treasure Island, what is the name of the island off the southeast coast of Treasure Island? A.Pirate Island B.Spyglass Island C.Parrot Island D.Skeleton Island
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SOUTHEAST ASIAN CULTURE IN THE U.S. • Saving face is important in Southeast Asian cultures. Collectivism is another key aspect of this culture. The focus is on family and the community overall rather than the individual. Much of the trafficking that takes place is due to “helping” the family as a whole by bringing income to the family. For example, family may sell their daughter to provide for the rest of the family. • Position in society is based on achievement and ascription. Family matters. It is very important to present ones family in a positive way and bring respect to ones family. Societal roles and expectations are often based on what family one belongs to as well. Education is important in this culture as well. • Southeast Asian culture is very much a hierarchical society. Family is expected to take care of each other and it is important to respect ones family. Public displays of affection are not appropriate to this culture. However, it is not uncommon to see people of the same sex holding hands. • Buddhism is prevalent and the primary religion in Southeast Asian culture. Buddhism has created a society of people striving to do good so that good things may return to them in the future. • Time is more monochromic for Southeast Asian cultures than U.S. culture. In the U.S. timeliness is very IMG: important, but for Southeast Asian culture schedules http://2.bp.blogspot.com/are more flexible . CwKFNwlOoF4/TjxtB6kv3zI/AAAAAAAAAHg/UEUZA5BgFMk/s1600/human+trafficking-cover.jpg
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Works Cited  Barnosky, A, D. (2008). Megafauna biomass tradeoff as a driver of quaternary and future extinctions. PNAS, 105(1), 11543–11548.  Lomolino, M.V. (1985). Body size of mammals on islands: the island rule reexamined. The American Naturalist, 125(2), 310-316.  Lomolino, M.V. (2005). Body size evolution in insular vertebrates: generality of the island rule. Journal of Biogeography, 32, 1683-1699.   McClain, C.R., Boyer, A.G., & Rosenberg, G. (2006). The island rule and the evolution of body size in the deep sea. Journal of Biogeography, 33, 1578-1584   Meiri, S., Dayan, T., & Simberloff, D. (2004). Body size of insular carnivores: little support for the island rule. The American Naturalist, 163(3), 469-479.   Millien, V., & Damuth, J. (2004). Climate change and size evolution in an island rodent species: new perspectives on the island rule. Evolution, 58(6), 1353-1360.   Moen, R.A., Pastor, J., & Cohen, Y. (1999). Antler growth and extinction of irish elk. Evolutionary Ecology Research, 1, 235-249.   Raia, P., & Meiri, S. (2006). The island rule in large mammals: 60(8), 1731-1742. paleontology meets ecology. Evolution,
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Consequence of WWII How did Southeast Asia change?  Decline of Western colonial power  the myth of European superiority  Rise in  Southeast Asian independence movements  Japanese interests and influence in Southeast Asia  US interests and influence in Southeast Asia  Integration into global economy & community
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Consequence of WWII • How did Southeast Asia change? – Decline of Western colonial power – Decline of the myth of European superiority – Rise in • Southeast Asian independence movements • Japanese interests and influence in Southeast Asia • US interests and influence in Southeast Asia – Integration into global economy & community
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42. Southeast Farallon Island
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THE PARAMETER ESTIMATION: • We will provide estimations of the six parameter values a, b, c, f, h and M. It is impossible to determine the values with precision for an ancient civilization in an ecosystem that no longer exists. Consequently, for each parameter we determine a range of reasonable values using established biological research on similar ecosystems. • The growth rate of the population of people a could reasonably range from 0.005 to 0.05 per year. The growth rate for a pre-industrialized civilization tends to be around 0.0045. (Cohen, 1995) However, in the presence of abundant food this rate can be significantly higher. For example, historically documented cases (Birdsell, 1957) place the growth rate of a human population on Pitcairn Island at 0.034. • The growth rate of the Polynesian rats c could reasonably range from 5 to 25 per year. A litter size ranges from 1 to 10, with an average of 3.8. A female rat can have up to 13 litters in a year, with an average of 5.2. The time to maturity for a female rat is less than one year. (Williams 1973) The sex ratio is usually close to 1:1, but this changes to a male bias, it seems, in more dense, stable populations. Yearly production rate for females in similar islands are 17.2 (Hawaii); 9.8 (Ponape); 4.8 (Kure), 25.7 (Malaya) (Tamarin & Malecha, 1972). • It is also worthwhile considering the maximum number of rats that could have been supported on the island. For comparison, the density of rats on Kure Atol, a North Western Hawaiian Island is 45 rats per acre, fluctuating from 30 per acre to 75 per acre. The area of Easter Island is 171 sq-km., or 42255 acres. Thus, it would be reasonable to observe 2,000,000 or more rats on the Easter Island. • We assume that the growth rate of the Rapa Nui Jubaea palm trees could range between 0.01 per year to 1 per year or more, since each tree produces about 100 kg of nuts per year.
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CIP Funding Sources 1. General Obligation Bonds (State of Rhode Island) 2. Rhode Island Capital Plan (RICAP) Funds (State of Rhode Island) 3. Rhode Island Health and Educational Building Corporation (RIHEBC) Bonds 4. Private Funds 5. Grants (Government & Private) 6. Certificates of Participation (COP) 7. University Funds 8. Rhode Island Economic Development Corporation (RIEDC)
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Identification of Islands  Islands correspond to genomic regions spanned by multiple overlapping optical maps [4] Island 1 Island 2 Island 3 Contig Construction  For each island, “contigs” are defined as paths from sources to sinks within the overlap graph for the island  The most complete representation of the genomic region is represented by the heaviest
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Island Example • Island entity as XML Isabela 4588 1707 Fernandina
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LEARNING OUTCOMES MET • I learned actively through reviewing previous readings as well as researching scholarly sources on my own that focused on my topic. I improved my understanding of another culture (southeast Asian culture) as well as deepening my understanding of interactions between cultures and stereotypes that may arise. I now have greater expertise in the area of human trafficking and Southeast Asian culture and the worldviews of this culture. • I was able to think critically through evaluating the research I found. I read many interviews, studies, and statistics from many perspectives. Then, I compiled the information that I found to be most accurate and focused on primary sources and personal testimony of both traffickers and women that were trafficked. While researching Southeast Asian culture I recognize many beliefs, values, and worldviews that were discussed in our class readings. Current human trafficking is related to slave trade throughout history and it is apparent that history is having an effect on the current happenings of trafficking today. I also noticed that the dehumanization of those being trafficked is very similar to what took place with slave trade in history as well. I reflected both on in class readings and history to compile my research. In my research my personal awareness was raised as well. • I communicated clearly by narrowing my research to focus on main points and reliable sources. I then presented my research in a way that allowed others to learn about my topic in an accessibly way. The information I presented was straightforward. The information and research was prepared in a way that was logically sequential. • Interacting in diverse and complex environments was important to my project as well. I tried to be open when researching while maintaining a scholastically critical perspective. I took in information without bias, but tried to recognize the biases of the writers/researchers presenting the information I found. I tried to present my
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EOC #34 • A car speeds up as it makes a circular turn from heading due south to heading due east. When exactly halfway around the curve (heading southeast) his total acceleration is 3.0 m/s2, 20 degrees north of east. What are the magnitudes of the radial and tangential components of his acceleration? What is the cardinal direction of each component? Southeast is 45 degrees from due east. • Ans: radial: 2.7 m/s2, northeast • tangential 1.27 m/s2, southeast Copyright © 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley.
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SEATO (1954 - 1977) • Southeast Asia Treaty Organization • Southeast Asia Collective Defense Treaty • Australia, France, Great Britain, New Zealand, Pakistan, the Philippines, Thailand, and the United States • oppose further Communist gains in Southeast Asia
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9. Will there be precipitation between 12Z tomorrow and 12Z the next day? Links: •NWS Hydrometeorological Prediction CenterShort Range Forecasts (Drag and drop copies of the relevant “short range forecast” maps here, and rescale them to a smaller size. Label each with the forecast time). •Latest NWS Point Forecast: Copy and paste text from the NWS point forecast relevant to the forecast period. (See example below.) Put both the text and the link above on a new page if necessary. Tonight: A 20 percent chance of showers. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 57. South southeast wind around 6 mph. Friday: A 20 percent chance of showers. Cloudy, with a high near 65. Southeast wind 6 to 8 mph becoming southwest. ] Friday Night: A 30 percent chance of rain, mainly afer 11pm. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 57. West southwest wind 6 to 11 mph becoming south southeast.
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Gaunillo’s Objection The Greatest Conceivable Island Objection (Perfect Island, Lost Island) Assume the GCI exists only in the mind. If the GCI exists only in the mind, then a greater island can be imagined, which exists not only in the mind but in reality The GCI isn’t really the GCI (contrad.) The GCI must exist.
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At any given time the size of the population that our island can support ••depends   on the amount of resources on the island. Given our choice of units, the island has the capacity to support R people. The evolution of the population is described by a Logistic Equation with the carrying capacity equal to R.   • The positive constant a has units of inverse time. The quantity aP is the net growth rate of the population in circumstances in which resources are abundant. Observe that when there are no resources (R = 0) the carrying capacity for the population is zero. This makes sense, but it causes mathematical trouble in the form of a singularity on the P-axis. The (P/R) term in the equation above places the Basener Ross model in the class of ratio-dependent models, a class that has recently received much attention in the population biology literature. (Turchin, 2003a,b) • The main virtues of this model are that it incorporates a variable carrying capacity for the population and that it is based on a simple but sensible account of the interaction between a population and its resources. Moreover, the predictions of this model match archaeological data for the population of Easter Island; the predictions of standard models, such as the logistic model or the Lotka-Volterra model, do not.
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Globec 01: Patterns of Energy Flow and Utilization on Georges Bank Funding: National Science Foundation: $1,500,000 Timeline: 2001-2005 Principal Investigator: Dian Gifford, University of Rhode Island Co-Investigators: James Bisagni, University of Massachusetts Jeremy Collie, University of Rhode Island Edward Durbin, University of Rhode island Michael Fogarty, NMFS, Woods Hole Jason Link, NMFS, Woods Hole Lawrence Madin, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution David Mountain, NMFS, Woods Hole Debra Palka, NMFS, Woods Hole Michael Sieracki, Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Science John Steele, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Barbara Sullivan, University of Rhode island
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Engineering Design Problem • A recent hurricane collapsed a bridge, which was the only way off of an island. The islanders are running out of resources quickly and need help. • Your engineering team has concluded that the best, and safest, option is to transport the people off the island. The water’s current is too strong; therefore, boats cannot be used to transport people off of the island. • The only means of transportation remaining is the island’s famous zip line, which includes a section leading from the island to a neighboring city. www.engineeringmessages.org 1/21/15 This material is based upon work supported by the Engineering Science Foundation of Dayton under 5
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Rabbits and the Fibonacci Numbers (cont.) Solution: Let fn be the the number of pairs of rabbits after n months. There are is f1 = 1 pairs of rabbits on the island at the end of the first month. We also have f2 = 1 because the pair does not breed during the first month. To find the number of pairs on the island after n months, add the number on the island after the previous month, fn-1, and the number of newborn pairs, which equals fn-2, because each newborn pair comes from a pair at least two months old. Consequently the sequence {fn } satisfies the recurrence relation fn = fn-1 + fn-2 for n ≥ 3 with the initial conditions f1 = 1 and f2 = 1. The number of pairs of rabbits on the island after n months is given by the nth Fibonacci number.
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