Math & Nature  References ◦ Bishop, K.L., Wainwright, P.C., and Holzman, R. (2008). Anterior to posterior wave of buccal expansion in suction feeding fish is critical for optimizing fluid flow velocity profile. Journal of the Royal Society, Interface. 5:1309-1316. ◦ Ferry-Graham, L.A., Wainwright, P.C., and Bellwood, D.R. (2001).  Prey capture in long-jawed butterflyfishes (Chaetodontidae): the functional basis of novel feeding habits. Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology. 256:167-184. ◦ Galileo Galilei, The Assayer, as translated by Stillman Drake (1957), Discoveries and Opinions of Galileo pp. 237 - 238. New York: Doubleday & Company. ◦ Gibb, A.C. and Ferry-Graham, L.A. (2005). Cranial movements during suction feeding in teleost fishes: Are they modified to enhance suction production? Zoology. 108(2): 141-153. ◦ Grubich, J.R. (2001). Prey Capture in Actinopterygian Fishes: A Review of Suction Feeding Motor Patterns with New Evidence from an Elopomorph Fish, Megalops atlanticus. Integrative and Comparative Biology. 41(6): 1258-1265. ◦ Holzman, R., Day, S.W., and Wainwright, P.C. (2007). Timing is everything: coordination of strike kinematics affects the force exerted by suction feeding fish on attached prey. Journal of Experimental Biology. 210: 3328-3336. ◦ Holzman, R., Day, S.W., Mehta, R.S., and Wainwright, P.C. (2008). Jaw protrusion enhances forces exerted on prey by suction feeding fishes. Journal of the Royal Society, Interface. 5(29): 1445-1457.
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Math & Nature  References ◦ Liem, K., Bemis, W., Walker, W.F., and Grande, L. (2001). Functional Anatomy of the Vertebrates: An Evolutionary Perspective. New York. Cengage Learning. ◦ Merrill, M.D. (2002). First principles of instruction. Educational Technology Research and Development. 50 (3): 43 – 59. ◦ Motta, P.J., Hueter, R.E., Tricas, T.C., Summers, A.P., Huber, D.R., Lowry, D., Mara, K.R., Matott, M.P., Whitenack, L.B., and Wintzer, A.P. (2008). Functional morphology of the feeding apparatus, feeding constraints, and suction performance in the nurse shark Ginglymostoma cirratum. Journal of Morphology. 269(9): 1041-1055. ◦ Motta, P.J., Maslanka, M., Hueter, R.E., Davis, R.L., de la Parra, R., Mulvany, S.L., Habegger, M.L., Strother, J.A., Mara, K.R., Gardiner, J.M., Tyminski, J.P., and Zeigler, L.D. (2010). Feeding anatomy, filter-feeding rate, and diet of whale sharks Rhincodon typus during surface ram filter feeding off the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico. Zoology. 113: 199-212. ◦ Sanford, C.P.J. and Wainwright, P.C. (2002). Use of sonomicrometry demonstrates the link between prey capture kinematics and suction pressure in largemouth bass. Journal of Experimental Biology. 205: 3445-3457. ◦ Svanback, R., Wainwright, P.C., and Ferry-Graham, L.A. (2002). Linking cranial kinematics, buccal pressure, and suction feeding performance in largemouth bass. Physiological and Biochemical Zoology. 75(6): 532-543.
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Goliath Grouper Suction Feeding Cone A Length (mm) Area (mm2) a 34.9  N/A b  153.6 Cone B Length (mm) Area (mm2) a  34.9 Time 0 c  54.3 N/A d  6.4 e   Volume of feeding mechanism before expansion (t0) Cone A Length (mm) Area (mm2) a   N/A b   Cone B Length (mm) Area (mm2) a   Time 1 c     d   e   Volume of feeding mechanism at maximum expansion (t1) Volume change during feeding event (mm3) Duration of feeding event (sec) Area of mouth at maximum expansion (t1) (mm2) Velocity of water flow into mouth (mm/sec) Volume (mm3)   Volume (mm3)     Volume (mm3)   Volume (mm3)       0.132     
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Goliath Grouper Suction Feeding Cone A Length (mm) Area (mm2) a 34.9  N/A b  153.6 Cone B Length (mm) Area (mm2) a  34.9 Time 0 c  54.3 N/A d  6.4 e  12.2 Volume of feeding mechanism before expansion (t0) Cone A Length (mm) Area (mm2) a   N/A b   Cone B Length (mm) Area (mm2) a   Time 1 c     d   e   Volume of feeding mechanism at maximum expansion (t1) Volume change during feeding event (mm3) Duration of feeding event (sec) Area of mouth at maximum expansion (t1) (mm2) Velocity of water flow into mouth (mm/sec) Volume (mm3)  195916.8 Volume (mm3)  84289.7  180206.5 Volume (mm3)   Volume (mm3)       0.132     
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Goliath Grouper Suction Feeding Cone A Length (mm) Area (mm2) a 34.9  N/A b  153.6 Cone B Length (mm) Area (mm2) a  34.9 Time 0 c  54.3 N/A d  6.4 e 12.2 Volume of feeding mechanism before expansion (t0) Cone A Length (mm) Area (mm2) a  39.5 N/A b  161.3 Cone B Length (mm) Area (mm2) a  39.5 Time 1 c  56.4   d  32.6 e   Volume of feeding mechanism at maximum expansion (t1) Volume change during feeding event (mm3) Duration of feeding event (sec) Area of mouth at maximum expansion (t1) (mm2) Velocity of water flow into mouth (mm/sec) Volume (mm3) 195916.8  Volume (mm3) 84289.7   280206.5 Volume (mm3)   Volume (mm3)        0.132    
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Goliath Grouper Suction Feeding Cone A Length (mm) Area (mm2) a 34.9  N/A b  153.6 Cone B Length (mm) Area (mm2) a  34.9 Time 0 c  54.3 N/A d  6.4 e 12.2 Volume of feeding mechanism before expansion (t0) Cone A Length (mm) Area (mm2) a  39.5 N/A b  161.3 Cone B Length (mm) Area (mm2) a  39.5 Time 1 c  56.4   d  32.6 e  266.5 Volume of feeding mechanism at maximum expansion (t1) Volume change during feeding event (mm3) Duration of feeding event (sec) Area of mouth at maximum expansion (t1) (mm2) Velocity of water flow into mouth (mm/sec) Volume (mm3) 195916.8  Volume (mm3) 84289.7   280206.5 Volume (mm3)  263547.1 Volume (mm3)  230974.7  494521.7  214315.3  0.132    
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Goliath Grouper Suction Feeding Cone A Length (mm) Area (mm2) a 34.9  N/A b  153.6 Cone B Length (mm) Area (mm2) a  34.9 Time 0 c  54.3 N/A d  6.4 e 12.2 Volume of feeding mechanism before expansion (t0) Cone A Length (mm) Area (mm2) a  39.5 N/A b  161.3 Cone B Length (mm) Area (mm2) a  39.5 Time 1 c  56.4  3338.8 d  32.6 e  266.5 Volume of feeding mechanism at maximum expansion (t1) Volume change during feeding event (mm3) Duration of feeding event (sec) Area of mouth at maximum expansion (t1) (mm2) Velocity of water flow into mouth (mm/sec) Volume (mm3) 195916.8  Volume (mm3) 84289.7   280206.5 Volume (mm3)  263547.1 Volume (mm3)  230974.7  494521.7  214315.3  0.132 3338.8   
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Goliath Grouper Suction Feeding Cone A Length (mm) Area (mm2) a 34.9  N/A b  153.6 Cone B Length (mm) Area (mm2) a  34.9 Time 0 c  54.3 N/A d  6.4 e 12.2 Volume of feeding mechanism before expansion (t0) Cone A Length (mm) Area (mm2) a  39.5 N/A b  161.3 Cone B Length (mm) Area (mm2) a  39.5 Time 1 c  56.4  3338.8 d  32.6 e  266.5 Volume of feeding mechanism at maximum expansion (t1) Volume change during feeding event (mm3) Duration of feeding event (sec) Area of mouth at maximum expansion (t1) (mm2) Velocity of water flow into mouth (mm/sec) Volume (mm3) 195916.8  Volume (mm3) 84289.7   280206.5 Volume (mm3)  263547.1 Volume (mm3)  230974.7  494521.7  214315.3  0.132 3338.8   486
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Snook Suction Feeding Cone A Length (mm) Area (mm2) a 2.1  N/A b  27.6 Cone B Length (mm) Area (mm2) a  2.1 Time 0 c  12.3 N/A d  1.8 e   Volume of feeding mechanism before expansion (t0) Cone A Length (mm) Area (mm2) a  7.0 N/A b  28.9 Cone B Length (mm) Area (mm2) a  7.0 Time 1 c  12.3   d  5.9 e   Volume of feeding mechanism at maximum expansion (t1) Volume change during feeding event (mm3) Duration of feeding event (sec) Area of mouth at maximum expansion (t1) (mm2) Velocity of water flow into mouth (mm/sec) Volume (mm3)   Volume (mm3)     Volume (mm3)   Volume (mm3)        0.036    
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Snook Suction Feeding Cone A Length (mm) Area (mm2) a 2.1  N/A b  27.6 Cone B Length (mm) Area (mm2) a  2.1 Time 0 c  12.3 N/A d  1.8 e 73.8  Volume of feeding mechanism before expansion (t0) Cone A Length (mm) Area (mm2) a  7.0 N/A b  28.9 Cone B Length (mm) Area (mm2) a  7.0 Time 1 c  12.3  109.4 d  5.9 e  66.0 Volume of feeding mechanism at maximum expansion (t1) Volume change during feeding event (mm3) Duration of feeding event (sec) Area of mouth at maximum expansion (t1) (mm2) Velocity of water flow into mouth (mm/sec) Volume (mm3) 127.5  Volume (mm3)  147.2  274.7 Volume (mm3) 1482.9  Volume (mm3)  1611.5 3094.4   2819.7  0.036  109.4  716
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Longjaw Butterfly Fish Suction Feeding Cone A Length (mm) Area (mm2) a 5.0 N/A b 14.9 Cone B Length (mm) Area (mm2) a 5.0 Time 0 c 31.2 N/A d 1.1 e   Volume of feeding mechanism before expansion (t0) Cone A Length (mm) Area (mm2) a 5.0 N/A b 14.9 Cone B Length (mm) Area (mm2) a 5.0 Time 1 c 31.6   d 1.1 e   Volume of feeding mechanism at maximum expansion (t1) Volume change during feeding event (mm3) Duration of feeding event (sec) Area of mouth at maximum expansion (t1) (mm2) Velocity of water flow into mouth (mm/sec) Volume (mm3)   Volume (mm3)     Volume (mm3)   Volume (mm3)        0.022    
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Longjaw Butterfly Fish Suction Feeding Cone A Length (mm) Area (mm2) a 5.0 N/A b 14.9 Cone B Length (mm) Area (mm2) a 5.0 Time 0 c 31.2 N/A d 1.1 e  8.8 Volume of feeding mechanism before expansion (t0) Cone A Length (mm) Area (mm2) a 5.0 N/A b 14.9 Cone B Length (mm) Area (mm2) a 5.0 Time 1 c 31.6  3.8 d 1.1 e  8.9 Volume of feeding mechanism at maximum expansion (t1) Volume change during feeding event (mm3) Duration of feeding event (sec) Area of mouth at maximum expansion (t1) (mm2) Velocity of water flow into mouth (mm/sec) Volume (mm3) 390.1  Volume (mm3)  1036.0  1426.1 Volume (mm3)  390.1 Volume (mm3)  1049.3  1439.4  13.3  0.022  3.8  159
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4. Humpbacks feeding
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Distributive Theorems • X(Y + Z) = XY +XZ • (W + X)(Y + Z) = WY + WZ + XY + XZ • In these cases, ordinary arithmetic rules apply and can alter the gate structure from 1) a twoinput OR gate feeding an AND gate INTO two AND gates feeding a two-input OR gate, 2) two 2-input OR gates feeding a 2-input AND gate INTO four 2-input AND gates feeding a 3-input OR gate.
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Math & Nature  Fish feeding mechanisms ◦ Suction feeding  Goliath grouper Epinephelus itajara  Questions  What fluid velocity can the goliath grouper generate during suction feeding?  How does suction feeding by the goliath grouper compare to other fish?
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Math & Nature    Suction feeding in the snook Centropomus undecimalis ◦ Given  Dimensions of cones A and B at rest (t0) and at maximum expansion of the feeding mechanism (t1)  Duration of the feeding event (t1 - t0) 5) Find the velocity of water flow into the mouth of the snook during suction feeding.
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Math & Nature    Suction feeding in the longjaw butterfly fish Forcipiger longirostris ◦ Given  Dimensions of cones A and B at rest (t0) and at maximum expansion of the feeding mechanism (t1)  Duration of the feeding event (t1 - t0) 6) Find the velocity of water flow into the mouth of the longjaw butterfly fish during suction feeding.
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Feeding  “skip a day” feeding programs insure uniform access; birds are fed larger amounts every other day (e.g. 4 days per week).  Separate sex feeding – – Different diets fed to males and females to match nutritional needs (females require more calcium). Wire grills prevent males from feeding from the female troughs (their combs are too big to fit through) and the male feeders are raised high enough off the floor that the females can’t reach them.
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Holothuroidea Feeding   25 Possess retractile feeding tentacle that surrounds the mouth While suspension or deposit feeding each tentacle is cleaned in the mouth Phylum Echinodermata
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Feeding Model (Lee and Myers, 1996; Lindstedt, 1971) Stimulant, continuation of feeding Arrestant, stop movement No Detection & Orientation Move? Yes Repellant, movement away from feed Yes Attractant, locomotion towards feed Ingest? Yes No Suppressant, rejection of feed Incitant, initiation of feeding Yes Ingest? No Deterrant, rejection of feed
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Feeding Schedule • Shrimp are most active and well-distributed at night • daytime = poor distribution, less activity • feeding times: 05:00 (25%), 19:00 (25%), 0:00 (50%) • pay very close attention to where shrimp are at these times and whether molting • feeding times often have to be adjusted to allow for only one group of feeders
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Energy Flow in Ecosystems: • Energy flows through trophic (feeding) levels: • Autotrophs: ‘self feeder’ - an organism that can capture light energy … store in organic molecules – Photosynthesis – anabolic reaction • Plants, algae and certain bacteria • Heterotrophs: ‘other feeder’: – rely on breakdown of organic molecules produced by an autotroph as an energy source – catabolic • Trophic, or feeding level: organisms feeding at the same energy level
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Math & Nature   Fish feeding mechanisms ◦ Suction feeding  Most common fish feeding mechanism  Water cohesion  Suction performance  D. Huber
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