DX Joint Definition - Supported Result Dependant Functions Definition Returns the x-component of the translational displacement vector from marker j to marker i as expressed in marker k coordinate system. Marker j defaults to the global coordinate system if it is not specified. Similarly, marker k defaults to ground if it is not specified. Format DX(i[,j][,k]) Arguments i - The marker whose origin is being measured. j - The marker whose origin is the reference point for the displacement calculation. k - The marker in whose coordinates the x-component of the displacement vector is being calculated. Set k = 0 if you want the results to be calculated along the x-axis of the global coordinate system. Examples DX(21,11,32)**2 This function is the square of the x-displacement of Marker 21 with respect to Marker 11 as computed in the coordinate system of Marker 32.
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Joint Definition - Supported Result Dependant Functions DY Definition The DY function returns the y-component of the translational displacement vector from marker j to marker i as expressed in the marker k coordinate system. Marker j defaults to the global coordinate system if it is not specified. Similarly, marker k defaults to the global coordinate system if it is not specified. Format DY(i[,j][,k]) Arguments i - The marker whose origin is being measured. j - The marker whose origin is the reference point for the displacement calculation. Set j=0 if you want j to default to the global coordinate system while still specifying l. k - The marker in whose coordinates the y-component of the displacement vector is being calculated. Set k = 0 if you want the results to be calculated along the x-axis of the global coordinate system. Examples DY(21,11,32)**2 This function is the square of the y-displacement of Marker 21 with respect to Marker 11 as computed in the coordinate system of Marker 32.
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Joint Definition - Supported Result Dependant Functions DZ Definition The DZ function returns the z-component of the translational displacement vector from marker j to marker i as expressed in the marker k coordinate system. Marker j defaults to the global coordinate system if it is not specified. Similarly marker k defaults to the global coordinate system if it is not specified. Format DZ(i[,j][,k]) Arguments i - The marker whose origin is being measured. j - The marker whose origin is the reference point for the displacement calculation. Set j=0 if you want j to default to the global coordinate system while still specifying l. k - The marker in whose coordinates the z-component of the displacement vector is being calculated. Set k = 0 if you want the results to be calculated along the x-axis of the global coordinate system. Examples DZ(21,11,32)**2 This function is the square of the z-displacement of Marker 21 with respect to Marker 11 as computed in the coordinate system of Marker 32
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AX Joint Definition - Supported Result Dependant Functions Definition: The AX function returns the rotational displacement of marker i about the x-axis of marker j. Marker j defaults to the global coordinate system if it is not specified. This value is computed as follows: assume that rotations about the other two axes (y-, z-axes) of marker j are zero. Then AX is the angle between the two y-axes (or the two z-axes). AX is measured in a counter- clockwise sense from the yaxis of the J marker to the y-axis of the I marker. Format AX(i[,j]) Arguments i - The marker whose rotations are being sought. j - The marker with respect to which the rotations are being measured. Examples -20*AX(43,32) The value of the function is -20 times the angle between the y axes of Markers 43 and 32. The angle is measured in a counterclockwise sense from the y-axis of Marker 32 to the y-axis of Marker 43.
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Joint Definition - Supported Result Dependant Functions AY Definition The AY function returns the rotational displacement of marker i about the y-axis of marker j. Marker j defaults to the global coordinate system if it is not specified. This value is computed as follows: assume that rotations about the other two axes (x-, z-axes) of marker j are zero. Then AY is the angle between the two x-axes (or the two z-axes). AY is measured in a counter- clockwise sense from the x-axis of the J marker to the x-axis of the I marker. Format AY(i[,j]) Arguments i - The marker whose rotations are being sought. j - The marker with respect to which the rotations are being measured. Examples -4*(AY(46,57)**2) The value of the function is -4 times the square of the angle between the x axes of Markers 46 and 57. The angle is measured in a counterclockwise sense from the x-axis of Marker 57 to the x-axis of Marker 46.
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Joint Definition - Supported Result Dependant Functions VX Definition The VX function returns the x-component of the difference between the velocity vector of marker i and the velocity vector of marker j as computed in the coordinate system of marker k. All vector time derivatives are taken in the reference frame of marker l. Marker j defaults to the global coordinate system if it is not specified. Similarly, markers i and j default to the global coordinate system if they are not specified. Format VX(i[,j][,k][,l]) Arguments i - The marker whose velocity is being measured. j - The marker with respect to which the displacement is being measured. Set j = 0 if you want j to default to the global coordinate system while still specifying l. k - The marker in whose coordinate system the velocity vector is being expressed. Set k = 0 if you want the results to be calculated along the x-axis of the global coordinate system. l - The reference frame in which the first time derivative of the displacement vector is taken. Set l = 0 if you want the time derivatives to be taken in the ground reference frame. Examples -20*VX(236,168,168,168) This function defines a damper acting between Markers 236 and 168. The damping force components are proportional to the components of the velocity between Markers 236 and 168 as seen and measured by an observer at Marker 168.
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WX Joint Definition - Supported Result Dependant Functions Definition The WX function returns the x-component of the difference between the angular velocity vector of marker i in ground and the angular velocity vector of marker j in ground, and expressed in the coordinate system of marker k. Marker j defaults to the global coordinate system if it is not specified. Similarly, marker k defaults to the global coordinate system if it is not specified. Format WX(i[,j][,k]) Arguments i - The marker whose velocity is being measured. j - The marker with respect to which the displacement is being measured. Set j = 0 if you want j to default to the global coordinate system while still specifying l. k - The marker in whose coordinate system the velocity vector is being expressed. Set k = 0 if you want the results to be calculated along the x-axis of the global coordinate system. Examples WX(1236,2169,2169) This function returns the x-component of the angular velocity Markers 1236 and 2169 as measured in the coordinate system of Marker 2169.
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Joint Definition - Supported Result Dependant Functions WY Definition The WY function returns the y-component of the difference between the angular velocity vector of marker i in ground and the angular velocity vector of marker j in ground, and expressed in the coordinate system of marker k. Marker j defaults to the global coordinate system if it is not specified. Similarly, marker k defaults to the global coordinate system if it is not specified. Format WY(i[,j][,k]) Arguments i - The marker whose velocity is being measured. j - The marker with respect to which the displacement is being measured. Set j = 0 if you want j to default to the global coordinate system while still specifying l. k - The marker in whose coordinate system the velocity vector is being expressed. Set k = 0 if you want the results to be calculated along the x-axis of the global coordinate system. Examples WY(1236,2169,2169) This function returns the y-component of the angular velocity Markers 1236 and 2169 as measured in the coordinate system of Marker 2169.
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Joint Definition - Supported Result Dependant Functions WZ Definition The WZ function returns the z-component of the difference between the angular velocity vector of marker i in ground and the angular velocity vector of marker j in ground, and expressed in the coordinate system of marker k. Marker j defaults to the global coordinate system if it is not specified. Similarly, marker k defaults to the global coordinate system if it is not specified. Format WZ(i[,j][,k]) Arguments i - The marker whose velocity is being measured. j - The marker with respect to which the displacement is being measured. Set j = 0 if you want j to default to the global coordinate system while still specifying l. k - The marker in whose coordinate system the velocity vector is being expressed. Set k = 0 if you want the results to be calculated along the x-axis of the global coordinate system. Examples WZ(1236,2169,2169) This function returns the z-component of the angular velocity Markers 1236 and 2169 as measured in the coordinate system of Marker 2169.
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AZ Joint Definition - Supported Result Dependant Functions Definition The AZ function returns the rotational displacement of marker i about the z-axis of marker j. Marker j defaults to the global coordinate system if it is not specified. This value is computed as follows: assume that rotations about the other two axes (x-, y-axes) of marker j are zero. Then AZ is the angle between the two x-axes (or the two y-axes). AZ is measured in a counter- clockwise sense from the x-axis of the J marker to the x-axis of the I marker. Format AZ(i[,j]) Arguments i - The marker whose rotations are being sought. j - The marker with respect to which the rotations are being measured. Examples -30*(AZ(21,32)-25D)
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Joint Definition - Supported Result Dependant Functions VM Definition The VM function calculates the magnitude of the first time derivative of the displacement vector of marker i with respect to marker j. The vector time derivative is taken in the reference frame of marker l. Markers i and j default to the global coordinate system if they are not specified. Format VM(i[,j][,l]) Arguments i - The marker whose velocity is being measured. Set i= 0 if you want it to default to the global coordinate system. j - The marker with respect to which the displacement is being measured. Set j = 0 if you want j to default to the global coordinate system while still specifying l. l - The reference frame in which the time derivative of the displacement vector is taken. Set l = 0 if you want the time derivatives to be taken in the ground reference frame. Examples VM(23,0,32) This functions returns the magnitude of the velocity of the origin of Marker 23 with respect to ground. The time derivative for the velocity computation is taken in the reference frame of Marker 32. VM(21,32,43) This function returns the magnitude of the velocity vector between Markers 21 and 32, as seen by an observer at Marker 43.
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Joint Definition - Supported Result Dependant Functions VY Definition The VY function returns the y-component of the difference between the velocity vector of marker i and the velocity vector of marker j as computed in the coordinate system of marker k. All vector time derivatives are taken in the reference frame of marker l. Marker j defaults to the global coordinate system if it is not specified. Similarly, markers i and j default to the global coordinate system if they are not specified. Format VY(i[,j][,k][,l]) Arguments i - The marker whose velocity is being measured. j - The marker with respect to which the displacement is being measured. Set j = 0 if you want j to default to global coordinate system while still specifying l. k - The marker in whose coordinate system the velocity vector is being expressed. Set k = 0 if you want the results to be calculated along the x-axis of the global coordinate system. l - The reference frame in which the first time derivative of the displacement vector is taken. Set l = 0 if you want the time derivatives to be taken in the ground reference frame. Examples -15*VY(236,168,168,168)
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Joint Definition - Supported Result Dependant Functions VZ Definition The VZ function returns the z-component of the difference between the velocity vector of marker i and the velocity vector of marker j as computed in the coordinate system of marker k. All vector time derivatives are taken in the reference frame of marker l. Marker j defaults to the global coordinate system if it is not specified. Similarly, markers i and j default to the global coordinate system if they are not specified. Format VZ(i[,j][,k][,l]) Arguments i - The marker whose velocity is being measured. j - The marker with respect to which the displacement is being measured. Set j = 0 if you want j to default to global coordinate system while still specifying l. k - The marker in whose coordinate system the velocity vector is being expressed. Set k = 0 if you want the results to be calculated along the x-axis of the global coordinate system. l - The reference frame in which the first time derivative of the displacement vector is taken. Set l = 0 if you want the time derivatives to be taken in the ground reference frame. Examples -20*VZ(236,168,168,168)
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1.5 Spectra: Spectrum channel Vin H channel 2.5 Spectra: V channel Spectra: channel H 4.0 Spectra: channelHVchannel 6.0 Spectra: channel V H 20 channel H 10 10 50 50 50 50 50 50 100 100 100 10 100 100 100 150 150 150 150 150 10 50 50 50 5 100 0 100 V 150 0 150 -5 150 10 5 5 100 0 0 -5 0 150 -5 -10 200 200 200 200 200 200 -10 200 -10 200 200 -10 -15 250 250 250 300 300 300 350 350 350 -10 250 250 250 -15 300 -20 300 300 350 350 350 -20 -15 250 250 250 -20 300 300 -25 300 -25 350 -30 350 350 -30 400 -35 400 -35 400 450 450 -20 -20 -25 -30 -30 400 400 400 450 450 450 -30 400 400 400 450 450 -40 -35 -40 120 20 20 60 4080 6010080 120 100 spectrum in V channel 040429 exp1, cut2, rad#74=180o 180o 40 120 20 450 -40 40 80 40 100 60 80 120 100 Spectrum in H channel Spectra: channel V 040429 exp1, cut3, az#28=180o 50 6020 120 20 40 80 60100 80120100 Spectra: V channel Spectra: channel H 040429, exp1, cut4, rad#342=180o 20 50 50 100 40 50 10 100 100100 20 60 120 20 40 2060 40 80 60 100 80 120 100 Spectra:H channel channel V 040429 exp1, cut5, az#296=180o 120 -40 20 40 60 80 Spectra: channel H V 100 120 50 10 50 50 5 H 150 150150 150 0 0 100100 100 100 100 0 -5 150 150 -5 150 50 5 5 100 chan 10 10 50 50 -40 450 0 Range gates, (1gate = 1km/4) 00 0.5 150150 -5 150 -10 200 -10 200 200200 200 200 -10 200 200 200200 -15 250 -10 250 250250 300 300300 300 -20 -15 250 250 250 250250 -20 -20 300 300 300 -15 250 -20 -25300300 -25 300 -25 350 350350 350 350 350 350 -30350350 -30 -35 400400 -35 -40 -40 350 -30 400 -30 400 400400 450 450450 20 40 60 80 100 040429 exp1 cut1 rad#120=180o 120 20 20 4040 60 60 80 100 100 120 120 040429 exp1, cut2, rad#74=180o 450 -40 400 400 -35 400 450 -40 450 450 20 40 20 60 40 80 60 80100100120120 040429 exp1, cut3, az#28=180o 450450 20 2040 40 60 60 8080 100 100 120 040429, exp1, cut4, rad#342=180o 400 450 20 20 4040 60 60 80 100 100 120 120 040429 exp1, cut5, az#296=180o 20 40 60
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0.5 1.5 spectrum in V channel V spectrum spectrumininVHchannel channel spec 10 10 10 10 10 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 40 40 40 40 40 40 40 40 40 40 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 60 60 40 60 80 100 120 60 60 20 20 spectrum spectrumininVHchannel channel 40 40 60 60 80 80 100 100 120 120 spectrum spectrum in V in channel H channel 60 60 60 60 20 20 40 40 60 60 80 80100 100120 120 spectrum in V inchannel spectrum H channel spectrum spectrum in V in channel H channel spectrum in H channel 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 2020 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 3030 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 4040 40 40 40 40 40 40 40 5050 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 60 60 20 20 40 40 60 60 80 80 100 100 120 120 60 60 60 60 20 2040 40 60 6080 80100 100120 120 20 20 40 40 60 60 80 80100 100120 120 60 20 20 40 40 60 60 80 80100 100120 120 20 20 40 40 60 60 80 80100 100120 120 1010 6060 120 spectrum in Vinchannel spectrum H channel spectrum spectrum in V inchannel H channel 10 10 channel 100 spectrum spectrum in V in channel H channel 6.0 10 10 20 80 4.0 10 60 H 2.5 60 20 20 40 40 60 60 80 80100 100120 120 20 40 60 80 100 120 20 40
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Joint Definition - Supported Result Dependant Functions WM Definition The WM function returns the magnitude of the angular velocity vector of marker i with respect to marker j. Marker j defaults to the global coordinate system if it is not specified. Format WM(i[,j]) Arguments i - The marker whose velocity is being measured. j - The marker with respect to which the displacement is being measured. Set j = 0 if you want j to default to the global coordinate system while still specifying l. Examples WM(1236,2169) This function returns the magnitude of the angular velocity vector of Marker 1236 and Marker 2169.
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Distributed Snapshot Algorithm • Assume each process communicates with another process using unidirectional point-to-point channels (e.g, TCP connections) • Any process can initiate the algorithm – Checkpoint local state – Send marker on every outgoing channel • On receiving a marker – Checkpoint state if first marker and send marker on outgoing channels, save messages on all other channels until: – Subsequent marker on a channel: stop saving state for that channel Computer Science CS677: Distributed OS Lecture 11, page 4
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Digital TV Channels Lineup Channel Nickelodeon Cartoon Network Comedy Central Animal Planet HGTV Lifetime Lifetime Movie Network Bravo OWN Oxygen WE tv SoapNet E! Entertainment LOGO Tru-TV Spike TV Disney Channel Biography Channel Travel Channel Food Network Cooking Channel # 59.6 59.7 59.8 59.9 60.1 60.2 60.3 60.4 60.5 60.6 60.7 60.8 60.9 61.1 61.2 61.3 61.4 61.5 61.6 61.7 61.8 Channel Syfy Cloo Chiller FOX Movie Channel AMC IFC ReelzChannel Ovation TV Destination America MTV MTV2 VH1 VH1 Classics Fuse CMT Up BET TV One EWTN The Word TBN # 61.9 62.1 62.2 62.3 62.4 62.5 62.6 62.7 62.8 62.9 63.1 63.2 63.3 63.4 63.5 63.6 63.7 63.8 63.9 64.1 64.2 Channel World Harvest Television BBC America TLC History Channel H2 Discovery Discovery Fit and Health Science Channel Military Channel National Geographic Investigation Discovery Nat Geo Wild The Weather Channel Once Mexico RFD TV HITN TV MSG HD MSG Plus HD Sportsnet New York HD YES Network HD ESPN HD ESPN2 HD NFL Network HD NHL Network HD TBS HD FX HD HBO (East) HD HBO2 (East) HD # 64.3 64.4 64.5 64.6 64.7 64.8 64.9 65.1 65.2 65.3 65.4 65.5 65.6 65.7 65.8 65.9 66.1 66.2 67.1 67.2 68.1 68.2 69.1 69.2 70.1 70.2 71.1 71.2
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Joint Definition - Result Dependant Functions Motion Generators, Forces, and Moments allow the use of result dependant functions as part of their function specification. These can be entered for Joint motions, Forces, or Moments. Marker IDs Many of the ADAMS functions use Marker IDs as parameters to the function. To determine the Entity ID or the ID of markers attached to an entity, the marker icon listed on the function dialog will bring up a list of each motion entity and then the marker id’s underneath those entities. All Dynamic Designer Motion entities display some information under the title ADAMS Solver Data. This includes the Entity and the ID of the markers attached to the entity. In the image to the left, the Distance2 Constraint has two markers with IDs of 27 and 28 on parts 1 and 4 respectively. If I were measuring angular velocity of Part 1 with respect to Part4, I would use the WZ(I,J) functions where I would specify WZ(27,28) to measure the relative rotational velocity of Marker 27 with respect to Marker 28.
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Seismic attribute-assisted interpretation of incised valley fill geometries: A case study of Anadarko Basin Red Fork interval. Yoscel Suarez*, Chesapeake Energy and The University of Oklahoma, USA Kurt J. Marfurt, The University of Oklahoma, USA Mark Falk, Chesapeake Energy, USA Al Warner , Chesapeake Energy, USA Seismic Attribute Generation Edge Detection Relative Acoustic Impedance The Relative Acoustic Impedance (RAI) is a simplified inversion. This attribute is widely used for lithology discrimination and as a thickness variation indicator. Since the RAI enhances impedance contrast boundaries, it may help delimit different facies within an incised valley-fill complex. Figure 15 shows the better delineation of the different valley-fill episodes. The impedance amplitude variations within the system may be correlated to sand/shale ratios. Higher values of RAI seem to be related to sandier intervals (black arrow). Coherence According to Chopra and Marfurt (2007) coherence is a measure of similarity between waveforms or traces. Peyton et al. (1998) showed the value of this edge detection attribute to identify channel boundaries in the Red Fork level. Figure 11 shows the results of the modern coherence algorithm and the interpretation. The modern coherence algorithm is slightly superior. It shows additional features (blue arrows), and enhances the edge of Phase II (pink arrow). It also shows that the current outlines of Phase II could be modified in the encircled areas. Figure 15. Relative Acoustic Impedance (RAI) at the Red Fork level. Figure 11. Modern coherency horizon slice at the Red Fork level Figure 12. Other modern edge-detector attributes: a) Sobel coherence. b) Energy ratio coherence Energy Weighted Coherent Amplitude Gradients Chopra and Marfurt (2007), by using a wedge model, demonstrate that waveform difference detection algorithms are insensitive to waveform changes below tuning frequencies. In this study the energy ratio coherence, defined by the coherent energy normalized by the total energy of the traces within the calculation window, and the Sobel coherence, which is a measure of relative changes in amplitude were used. Figure 12 shows a horizon slice of the energy ratio coherence and the Sobel coherence at the Red Fork level. The results from these two energy weighted routines are very similar to the coherence attribute, however the level of detail of the coherency algorithm is greater in the encircled areas. Even though both algorithms show similar features, the Sobel coherence seems to be more affected by the acquisition footprint than does the energy ratio coherence. Seismic Attribute Blending Peak Frequency and Peak Amplitude Displays Liu and Marfurt (2007) show that by combining the peak frequency and peak amplitude volumes extracted from the spectral decomposition analysis, the interpreter can identify highly tuned intervals. Low peak frequency values correlate with thicker intervals and high peak frequencies with thinner features. Figures 16 (a,b) show the peak frequency and peak amplitude volumes respectively. Figure 16(c) shows the combination of both displays, which simplifies the interpretation of multiple volumes of data. Figure 16(d) shows the blended image with the overlain geological interpretation. This combination iof attributes shows a better definition of the Phases boundaries especially the Phase II in the NW corner of the survey, in between the two valley branches. The changes in facies within the Phase V are evident in the southernmost green arrow. The differentiation between the Phase III and Phase V is sharper (northernmost green arrow). Outside of the incised valley system the lithology relationship with frequency is still unclear. The dashed orange lines show the proposed changes to the Phase II outline. Curvature Although successful in delineating channels in Mesozoic rocks in Alberta, Canada (Chopra and Marfurt, 2008), for this study, volumetric curvature does not provide images of additional interpretational value. While the Red Fork channel boundaries can be delineated using this attribute (Figure 13), the results shown by the coherence and spectral decomposition are superior. In this situation the acquisition footprint negatively impacts the lateral resolution quality of the attribute. Blue arrows indicate channel edges. Figure 13. Other modern edge-detector attributes: a) Sobel coherence. b) Energy ratio coherence Figure 16. Peak Frequency and Peak Amplitude analysis at the Red Fork level. (a) Peak Frequency volume, red corresponds to higher frequencies. (b) Peak Amplitude volume, white corresponds to higher peak amplitude values. (c) Peak frequency and peak amplitude blended volume. The co-rendered image shows valley-fill boundaries. (d) co-rrendered image with interpretation Spectral Decomposition Matching pursuit spectral decomposition was used to generate individual frequency volumes as well as peak amplitude and peak frequency datasets. Castagna et al. (2003) discuss the value of using matching pursuit spectral decomposition and how we can associate different “tuning frequencies” to different reservoir properties like fluid content, thickness and/or lithology. Figure 14 shows a matching pursuit 36 Hz spectral component at the Red Fork level. The level of detail using matching pursuit spectral decomposition is superior to that provided by the DFT Figure 14. 36 Hz matching pursuit spectral decomposition. Note the enhanced level of detail offered by the matching pursuit spectral decomposition. a) without geological interpretation b) with geological interpretation This study has identified correlations between attribute expressions of Red Fork channels that can be applied to underexploited exploration areas in the Mid-continent, and to fluvial deltaic channels in Paleozoic rocks in general. When it comes to answer the key questions discussed at the beginning of this paper, we learned that the coherence and energy weighted attributes help improve the resolution of subtle features like small channels and channel levees. They also help differentiate the cutbank from the gradational inner bank. It is also evident from this study that even though there have been some improvements in the coherence routines, the differences between current algorithms with the ones applied by Peyton et al. in 1998 are minimal. Additionally, detailed channel geomorphology and lithology discrimination were possible by introducing the spectral decomposition and relative acoustic impedance attributes in the analysis. On one hand, the use of spectral decomposition helped define different facies within the channel system and increased the resolution of channel boundaries. On the other hand, the variations in the RAI values were found to be correlative to lithology infill, for instance higher values of RAI show direct relationship to shalier intervals within the channel complex. One of the key findings of this study is the great value that blended images of attributes bring to the interpreter. Such technology was not available ten years ago. But today, by combining multiple attributes, fluvial facies delineation is possible when co-rendering edge detection attributes with lithology indicators. It is important to mention that the signal/noise ratio of the data is a key factor that will determine the resolution and quality of the seismic attribute response. In this study, curvature did not provide images of additional interpretational value. These unsatisfactory results may be related to acquisition footprint contamination. Therefore, footprint removal methods will be performed in an attempt to enhance signal-tonoise ratio. Acknowledgments We thank Chesapeake Energy for their support in this research effort. We give special thanks to Larry Lunardi, Carroll Shearer, Mike Horn, Mike Lovell and Travis Wilson for their valuable contribution and feedback. And to my closest friends Carlos Santacruz and Luisa Aurrecoechea for cheering me up at all times. Amplitude Variability Semblance of the Relative Acoustic Impedance Chopra and Marfurt (2007) define semblance as “the ratio of the energy of the average trace to the average energy of all the traces along a specified dip.” Since RAI has sharper facies boundaries the semblance computed from RAI should be crisper than semblance computed from the conventional seismic. Figure 17 shows the value of combining these attributes. Outside of the channel complex the lithology relationship with frequency is still unclear(red arrow). The yellow arrow points to a potential fluvial channel outside of the incised valley-system. The dashed orange lines show the proposed changes to the Phase II outline. Conclusions Figure 17 a) the Semblance of the RAI and b) RAI and RAI semblance blended image. The combination of both attributes helps delineate Relative Acoustic Impedance boundaries.
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Channel Power, Control, and Leadership Channel Channel Power Power AAchannel channelmember’s member’scapacity capacityto tocontrol controlor or influence the behavior of other channel members influence the behavior of other channel members Channel Channel Control Control AAsituation situationthat thatoccurs occurswhen whenone onemarketing marketing channel channelmember memberintentionally intentionallyaffects affectsanother another member’s member’sbehavior behavior Channel Channel Leader Leader AAmember memberof ofaamarketing marketingchannel channelthat thatexercises exercises authority/power authority/powerover overthe theactivities activitiesof ofother othermembers members LO6 Chapter 13 Copyright ©2012 by Cengage Learning Inc. All rights reserved 34
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