So…Where Have You Been? In this assignment, I would like you to help me compile a composite profile of Thinking Geographically students’ geographic experience. Attached are three blank maps: one of Virginia’s localities; one of the United States; and one of the world (with enlarged insets for Europe and the Middle East). On each, shade in all of the localities, states, and countries you have traveled through or visited. You must have been on the ground in each locality, state, or country; airport layovers or airport hotel stays and travel through by train do not count!. Use whatever kind of marker you like (I prefer the medium highlighters with sharp and wide surfaces, but marking pens that won’t bleed through, colored pencils, and even crayons will do), as long as it’s easily seen on the maps. Virginia map – (1) color-in the localities you have been in and/or through. You may need to consult a Virginia highway map to figure out which Commonwealth localities you’ve experienced. For example, if you’ve been from Fairfax County to Longwood via US 15, from north to south, you’ve been through Fairfax, Prince William, Fauquier, Culpeper, Madison, Orange, Louisa, Fluvanna, Buckingham, and Prince Edward Counties. From the City of Richmond to Virginia Beach via I-64, I-664, and I-264/Virginia Beach Expressway, you would have been in Richmond City, Henrico, New Kent, James City, and York Counties, and Newport News, Hampton, Norfolk, and Virginia Beach Cities. All of the places you’ve been in Virginia should be contiguous (strung together) unless you flew/parachuted in, came in by boat, or snuck in through a neighboring state. If you’ve been to all but a handful of localities, you may mark those you have not been to, as long as you make a note of that on the map. (2) count up and record the number of localities you have been to/through, divide that number by 133, multiply by 100, and record the percentage of localities you’ve been to in the space provided (all told, you’ve probably been to more of Virginia than you realize – that’s part of the point of this!); (3) write in what you consider your home locality (probably where you graduated high school) in the space provided and indicate it with a darker color or black on the map (if you’re from out-of-state, just leave it blank); (4) check the appropriate box for urban/suburban/small town/rural (be aware that just because your locality has the work “city” in its title doesn’t necessarily mean it’s urban – which means built-up); and (5) use a line pattern to indicate the locality you most want to begin your teaching career in. US map – (1) color the states you’ve been to/through (remember: airports and train travel don’t count), darken/blacken in your home state; (2) write in your birthplace state (for most of you, that probably will be Virginia) in the space provided and blacken/darken it in on the map; (3) tally and record the number of states you’ve been to/through (including the District of Columbia and your home state), divide by 51, multiply by 100, and that’s the percentage of states you’ve been to and enter that number in the space provided; (4) with a horizontal line pattern for your father and a vertical line pattern for your mother, mark your parents’ birth states on the map (if it’s the same state, you’ll have a crisscrossed pattern) World map – (1) color the countries you’ve been to other than the U.S. (even if you’ve only been to a coastal resort, you’ve been to that country, but again, airport layovers don’t count); (2) tally and record the number of countries other than the U.S. that you’ve been to, divide by 205, multiply by 100, and that’s the percentage of countries other than the US that you’ve visited. Enter that number in the space provided. I’ve provided inset maps for Europe and the Middle East that show more detail if you’ve been to a small country that’s difficult to see. If you’ve been to an island country too small to be seen, list those on the map. You do not need to mark the U.S. on this map. I will tally up the total results and produce maps showing the percentage of students across all three sections who have been to/through particular Virginia localities, U.S. states, and other countries. This will give us an idea of how well-traveled you all are. Value: up to 15 points (12 necessary items, one point each + 3 possible neatness points) Due date: Wednesday, February 10, 2016 DO NOT INCLUDE THIS COVER SHEET WHEN YOU HAND THE MAPS IN! 1
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Recruiting Recruiting Evaluation Evaluation and and Metrics Metrics Evaluating EvaluatingRecruiting RecruitingEfforts Efforts Evaluating Evaluating Recruiting Recruiting Quality Qualityand and Quantity Quantity Evaluating Evaluating the theTime Time Required Requiredto to Fill Fill Openings Openings Evaluating Evaluating Recruiting Recruiting Costs Costsand and Benefits Benefits Copyright © 2005 Thomson Business & Professional Publishing. All rights reserved. Evaluating Evaluating Recruiting Recruiting Satisfaction Satisfaction 7–24
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Summary. • We learned about several types of reasoning. • We learned about conditional statements. • We learned about valid arguments. • We learned about direct proof. • We learned about indirect proof. • We learned about proof by exhaustion. • We learned about proof by induction. 33
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Can You divide any even number by 2 using Shorthand Division? Let’s try an easy one. Divide 620,854 by 2: Start from the left, do one digit at a time 14 div 2 in to 6 2 0, 8 5 4 3 1 0, 4 2 7 ◦ What’s ½ of 6? ◦ What’s ½ of 2? ◦ What’s ½ of 0? ◦ What’s ½ of 8? ◦ What’s ½ of 5? ◦ (It’s 2 with 1 left over; carry 1 to the 4, making it 14) 12 ◦ What’s ½ of 14? You  try: Divide 42,684 by 2. It’s 21,342 Click to Advance Divide 102,072 by 2. It’s 51,036 All About Primes 3
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chapter 8 Interference Retroactive interference: recently learned material interferes with previously stored information New  Old Retroactive interference French Spanish Learned first Learned second Proactive interference Proactive interference: previously stored material interferes with remembering recently learned material Old  New Old Phone Number New Phone Number Learned first Learned second
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What Students Learned        Learned how to work collaboratively with themselves and others ( Health Services ) They volunteered and worked many hours outside of class Used CCIT to learn WeMovie Learned how to use Prezi effectively Learned what makes good brochure, poster board Learned how to dress professionally and interact with public Learned how to self critique
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Lessons Learned As a group, we collectively learned the importance of working together to achieve a sought product or goal. Some of the most important lessons we learned as a group were learning how to collaborate together by incorporating our own individual strengths and ideas. Not only did we learn how to execute a plan and a schedule on Suretrak, but we learned how to do the same thing as a group. We learned how important it is to plan, delegate and give certain group members objectives to complete that match their abilities to execute it accurate and efficiently. Finally, we learned some of the basic operations of the Suretrak software and the R.S. Means Construction Data book. Knowing how to use these two things is important because it will make us more competitive as we enter the construction industry. Taggart 26
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Summary. • We learned about functions and the basic terms involved with functions. • We learned about the linear functions. • We learned about the quadratic functions. • We learned about the basic business functions. • We learned how to use a graphing calculator to make our work much easier. • We saw how spreadsheets can replace the work of a graphing calculator. 31        I love my calculator!       
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Tutorial 5 Summary XP • Learned how to display multiple Web pages in a Web browser using frames. • Learned how to create a frame layout and specify the source document for each frame. • Learned how to control the behavior and appearance of each frame. • Learned how to specify which frame will contain the results of an activated hyperlink • Learned how to support "frame-blind" browsers. • Discussed extensions of frames supported by some browsers. Creating Web Pages with HTML, 3e Prepared by: C. Hueckstaedt, Tutorial 5 71
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Cognitivist Theory (Continued) Theor y Language Learning as a Cognitive Process 1. Learning a language involves internal representations that regulate and guide performance. 2. Automatic processing activates certain nodes in memory when appropriate input is present. Activation is a learned response. 3. Memory is a large collection of nodes. 4. Controlled processing is not a learned response. It is a temporary activation of nodes in a sequence. 5. Skills are learned and routinized only after the earlier use of controlled processes have been used. 6. Learner strategies contain both declarative knowledge i.e. knowing the ‘what’ of the language-internalized rules and memorized chunks of language, and procedural knowledge i.e. know the ‘how’ of the language system to employ strategies.
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