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Building Emergency Team Building Emergency Team for Student Services Center In the event of an emergency evacuation, each Building Emergency Team (BET) member will be responsible for contacting individuals indicated in the chart below. Office of the AVP Itza Sanchez, Snr. Building Coordinator, SSC Office of the Associate Vice President Enrollment Services Work: 4- 2551 Mobile: 408-595-6213 E-mail: [email protected] Alt: Lois Mardis, ASPIRE/McNAIR Work: 4-2637 E-mail: [email protected] Office of Pre-College Programs Tom Reisz Work: 4-3221 E-mail: [email protected] Alt: Blanca Sanchez Work: 4-2572 Email: [email protected] Learning Assistance Resource Center (LARC) Alice Ting Work: 4-2589 E-mail: [email protected] Alt: Lan Ngo Work: 4-2546 E-mail: [email protected] Office of the Bursars Satish Patel Work: 4-1620 E-mail: [email protected] Alt: Betty Jo Alexander Work: 4-1623 E-mail: [email protected] Office of Financial Aid and Scholarships (FASO) Jared Blanton Work:4-6072 E-mail: [email protected] Alt: Francisco Marquez Work: 4-6091 E-mail: [email protected] Academic Advising and Retention Services (AARS) Lael Adediji Work: 4-2511 E-mail: [email protected] Alt: Cindy Kato Work: 4-1537 E-mail: [email protected] Systems/Grad Admissions Kirk Nguyen Work: 4-2537 E-mail: [email protected] Alt: Vicki Robison Work: 4-3356 E-mail: [email protected] Office of the Registrar Darcel Wood Work: 4-2095 E-mail: [email protected] Alt: Roselia Lobato-Morales Work: 4-2553 E-mail: [email protected] Undergraduate Admissions Gloria Milano Work: 4-2097 E-mail: [email protected] Alt: Joy Vickers Work: 4-2023 E-mail: [email protected] Student Outreach and Recruitment (SOAR) & Communications Kelly Pjesky Work: 4-2576 Email: [email protected] Alt: Joe Pinheiro Work: 4-2075 E-mail: [email protected] updated: 8/4/10
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Entrepreneurship: is it good enough to be social? John F. McVea and Michael J. Naughton Introduction • The term Social Entrepreneurship has experienced a huge growth in influence over that last decade. The literature proposes a number of advantages to social entrepreneurship as a frame of reference: • Promoting innovation within non-profits • Leveraging and focusing scarce philanthropic resources • Faster response to strategic challenges • Infusion of business skills to non-business world • Involvement of non government assets in social problems • Creation of hybrid (blurred) organizations between for profit and non profit worlds. It is widely observed that practice has outpaced theoretical development leading to little agreement on definitions or frameworks for social entrepreneurship. We believe that widespread and unchallenged acceptance of the term Social Entrepreneurship masks some dangers and has contributed to confusion in the field. We believe that if we apply some insights from Catholic Social Teaching to the issue of social entrepreneurship we can move beyond the false dichotomy of Entrepreneurship/ Social Entrepreneurship and identify three specific entrepreneurial strategies which support a more robust discussion of the nature of the work that is entrepreneurship. We believe that the field would benefit from spending less time discussing social entrepreneurship and more time discussion the nature of the good entrepreneur. • • • • • The dangers of naïve acceptance of Social Entrepreneurship • • • The rhetorical risk: • Narrow definition: if S.E. is simply used to rebrand non-profits then much of the value of the new activities, hybrid design, stimulation of new resources and innovation is lost. • Implied dichotomy: if “good” ventures are termed “social” it can imply that other forms of entrepreneurship are “asocial” or “anti social” • Boundarylessness: In contrast, if all business activities are deemed “social”, to some degree or other, then the term loses all meaning focus on the distinctive phenomenon that is S.E. Despite these risks we are more concerned with a risk beyond rhetoric; the risk of undermining the meaning of work, particularly from the perspective of Catholic Social Teaching. While this perspective is drawn from the Catholic tradition, accepting the content of CST does not require acceptance of Catholic faith (Guitan, 2009). The three goods of social entrepreneurship • We are concerned by the side-effects of a concentration thesis that suggests that the moral responsibilities of entrepreneurship can be concentrated in a subset of businesses called social enterprises, presumably leaving other enterprise to simply concentrate on serving themselves. • We are concerned by the impact such a concentration thesis could have on the conception of the meaning of work beyond the world of social enterprise. • We are concerned with how such an approach can focus attention solely on the altruistic contributions of entrepreneurial ventures as the sole measure of their contribution to the Common Good • Instead we propose that, rather than trying to determine the difference between entrepreneurship and social entrepreneurship, it would be more productive to focus on the questions “What is Good Entrepreneurship? What action and activities define that goodness?” • We further propose that, by apply the perspective of Catholic Social Teaching, we can identify three specific strategies through which entrepreneurial ventures may contribute to the Common Good thus suggesting that good entrepreneurship requires a focus on: 1. Good Goods. The primary way an entrepreneurial venture can contribute to the Common Good is by bringing into existence new products and services which are inherently good and which enrich lives and minimize any unintended harms. This can include what we call the “entrepreneurship of the mundane”, that is, the manufacture of the nuts and bolts and basic necessities of life as well as the creation of life saving treatments. However, inclusion of good goods as a primary moral contribution of entrepreneurship must also require of the entrepreneur analysis of what goods are not good, and what aspects of even good goods should be redesigned or rethought in order to minimize unintended consequences. We find, in our discussions, that this is a much under appreciated dimension of the good of entrepreneurship. 2. Good Work. The second way an entrepreneurial venture can contribute to the Common Good is through the nature of the work that is carried out by the venture. This dimension has several aspects both internal and external to the entrepreneur: • The development of good character in the entrepreneur. This aspect of the good is derived from the subjective dimension of work, that is, just as how-we-work ends up changing the world, so working-on-the-world changes us. Most professionals spend the majority of their waking hours at work. As habits, character and wisdom are developed through experience and activity, for the entrepreneur, doing good work is an important opportunity to develop character. Society as a whole is better off for having good, successful entrepreneurial leaders who, through that calling, can become leaders of character. This dimension of the entrepreneurial good is widely unappreciated even by entrepreneurs themselves • Good relations with employees, customers and other stakeholders. Value creation and trade creates opportunities for the building of social relationships. The central question is “Are you in good relation with those with whom you create value?’ Do your employees have opportunity to develop as people? 3. Good Wealth. The third way the good entrepreneur can contribute to the Common Good is through the creation of good wealth. Good wealth requires a balance of reward for labor/ creativity with the provision of a living wage to all. Good wealth is often captured by individual action but has social strings attached. From the CST perspective the creation of good wealth implies a particular solidarity with the poor. One way to contribute to the common good is to donate altruistically to those in need. But even here, altruism is only one of a number of possible strategies. Good entrepreneurs may also contribute by donating their time or their particular skills. Indeed, since the donation of time and work often requires physical interaction with those in need, it often generates a solidarity of far greater integrity. Finally, it must be emphasized that altruism, for the entrepreneur, is always dependent, indeed subsequent to the creation of good wealth in the first place. Literature cited Alvord, Sarah, David L. Brown, and Christine W. Letts, 2004. “Social Entrepreneurship and Societal Transformation: An Exploratory Study,” The Journal of Applied Behavioral Science. 40:260. Benedict XVI, Caritas et veritate,   Boschee, Jerr. 1998 “What does it take to be a social entrepreneur?” National Centre for Social Entrepreneurs (www.socialentrepreneurs.org/whatdoes/html), 5pp.   Cannon, Carl. 2000. “Charity for profit: how the new social entrepreneurs are creating good by sharing wealth” National Journal, June 16: 1898-1904.   Christie, Michael and Benson Honig. 2006. “Social entrepreneurship: New research findings.” Journal of World Business. 41: 1-5.   Dees, Gregory, J., 1998. “The Meaning of ‘Social Entrepreneurship,’” Original Draft: 10/3.   Drucker, P.F. 1985. Innovation and Entrepreneurship. New York: Harper & Row.   Fowler, Alan. “NGDOs as a moment in history: beyond aid to social entrepreneurship or civic innovation?” Third World Quarterly, 21(4): 637-654.   Gregg, S. and G. Preece: 1999, Christianity and Entrepreneurship (The Centre for Independent Studies Limited, St. Leonards, NSW, Australia).   Hibbert, Sally A., Gillian Hogg and Theresa Quinn. “Consumer response to social entrepreneurship: The case of the Big Issue in Scotland.” International Journal of Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Marketing. 7(3): 288-301.   Johnson, Sherrill, 2000. “Literature Review on Social Entrepreneurship,” Canadian Center for social Entrepreneurship. (http://www.bus.ualberta.ca/ccse/Publications/).   John Paul II, Pope.: 1992 Laborem Exercens (On Human Work): 1981, in D. J. O’Brien and T. A. Shannon, (eds.), Catholic Social Thought (Orbis Books, Maryknoll, NY).   John Paul II, Pope.: 1992 Sollicitudo Rei Socialis (On Social Concern): 1987 in D. J. O’Brien and T. A. Shannon, (eds.), Catholic Social Thought (Orbis Books, Maryknoll, NY).   Kennedy, R., G, Atkinson, and M. Naughton, (eds.): 1994, Dignity of Work: John Paul II Speaks To Managers and Workers (University Press of America, Lanham, Maryland).   Mair, Johanna and Ernesto Noboa, 2003. “Social Entrepreneurship: How Intentions to Create a Social Enterprise get Formed,” IESE Business School.   Mair, Johanna and Ignasi Marti, 2006. “Social entrepreneurship research: A source of explanation, prediction, and delight,” Journal of World Business. 41: 36-44.   Melé, D.:2001, ‘A Challenge for Business Enterprises: Introducing the Primacy of the Subjective Meaning of Work in Work Organization’, (http://www.stthomas.edu/cathstudies/cst/mgmt/le/papers/mele.htm) Conclusions We have argued that, while there is great promise in the contemporary social entrepreneurship movement, there are also a number of important dangers. We propose that, if we confront rather than acquiesce to these dangers, we can use the perspective of Catholic Social Teaching to broaden the scope of entrepreneurial ventures that we study, to enrich the moral dimension of entrepreneurial strategy and to deepen the teaching of entrepreneurship as a whole. We recommend the following to move toward these contributions: • Incorporate social entrepreneurship into entrepreneurship in a way that enhances the three goods of entrepreneurship. Specifically we propose replacing the questions “What is social entrepreneurship?” with the questions “What does it mean to be a Good entrepreneur?” From this perspective we can then apply what we have called the three goods of entrepreneurship as a means of supplying critical challenge and inspiration to all forms of entrepreneurship such that the true moral dimension of this critical force in our lives comes into fruition. • Encourage research within the entrepreneurship discipline that addresses traditional social entrepreneurial issues such as micro lending, fair trade products, etc. • Develop bridge courses such as Theo/Cath 306 which help students understand and experience the meaning of the good entrepreneur as well as connect students to the spiritual and moral principles of a good entrepreneur. • Expose entrepreneurship students to so-called social entrepreneurs as well so-called conventional good entrepreneurs so they can see the spectrum of entrepreneurial activities. © File copyright Colin Purrington. You may use for making your poster, of course, but please do not plagiarize, adapt, or put on your own site. Also, do not upload this file, even if modified, to third-party file-sharing sites such as doctoc.com. If you have insatiable need to post a template onto your own site, search the internet for a different template to steal. File downloaded from http://colinpurrington.com/tips/ academic/posterdesign. Acknowledgments I am indebted to Michael Naughton and Laura Dunham for their reflections and thoughts on this paper.
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Coordination of the Work-Study Program There are 1-2 Campus Work-Study Coordinators on each campus who oversee the work-study program on their campus. Campus Work-Study Coordinators: • Work in the Campus Financial Aid Office. • Serve as the primary contact for students and supervisors to answer work-study questions. • Advertise the work-study program and help recruit work-study students. • Disseminate work-study information throughout the year to supervisors and students. • Keep track of the current status of all work-study students on their campus. • Monitor their campus work-study funding levels. • Determine work-study eligibility and request work-study awards for eligible students. • Assist students with completing the work-study employment paperwork. • Assist supervisors with using the Job-X website to hire new work-study students. • Collect and review all work-study employment documents from students and supervisors.
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Homework – Scoring and Grading • Each HW Package contains 3 or more Sections • You SCORE each section, pass in the Package • I check your accuracy and GRADE your Package 0-10 staple Work 8 Work 106 Package #1Work Work 43 45 Work work Work Work Work 27 23 xx 32 Your name 1.3 1-25odd, … {32} Work work Your name 1.2 1-21odd, … {45} Work 31 work Your name 31 1.1 1-31odd, … {31} work Work Work 9 Your name 18 1.4 1-31odd, … {18}
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Evaluators are provided with a Rubric to assist in assessment Component Possible 100 Points Outstanding 25 Points Highly Successful 20 Points Successful 15 Points Minimally Successful 10 Points Unsuccessful 5 Points Technique Exceptional understanding of different media and their uses. Work exhibits mastery of a very wide range of visual arts techniques extending well beyond academic exercises. Very good understanding of different media and their uses. Work exhibits very good control in a broad range of visual arts techniques. Understandin g of different media and their uses is present. Work exhibits general competence in a variety of visual arts techniques. Understanding of different media and their uses is inconsistently evident. Work is occasionally competent in a few techniques. Understanding of different media and their uses is not evident. Work exhibits only very limited or very rare use of appropriate visual arts techniques. Design Exceptional understanding of the elements of design and composition and these are used skillfully and effectively to communicate highly sophisticated ideas. Very good understanding of the elements of design and composition and they are used very well to communicate important ideas. Understandin g of the elements of design and composition is present and they are used to communicate ideas in most instances. Understanding of elements of design and composition occasionally present. Communication of ideas occurs irregularly or in unintentional ways. Understanding of the elements of design and composition is not evident. Communication of ideas occurs rarely and is incomplete or unintended when it does. Creativity and Concept Work is highly unique and original; presents compelling and focused conceptualizations of ideas. Work is unique and original; presents interesting and clear conceptualiza tions ideas. Work is mostly unique and original; presents some interesting and clear conceptualiza tions of ideas. Work is sometimes unique or original; presents occasionally interesting or clear conceptualizati ons of ideas. Work is obviously derivative and unoriginal; does not present any interesting or clear ideas. Presentation Work exhibits mastery of presentation skills and materials without any errors. Work exhibits appropriate use of presentation skills and materials without significant errors. Work generally exhibits appropriate presentation skills and materials with few errors. Work exhibits some presentation skills and materials with several noticeable errors. Work exhibits inappropriate presentation skills and materials with many critical errors. Learning Outcomes that are assessed by evaluators: • • • • Technique Design Creativity and Concept Presentation Students are identified by number to aid in anonymity and limit the subjective nature of the evaluation process. The critics’ comments pertaining to course assignments and curriculum development are discussed in department and advisory board meetings. The Special Project Leader of Design in cooperation with the department chair may choose to incorporate this information
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Typical Structure of a Research Paper (cont.) • 2. Previous/Related work – Sometimes this part is included in the introduction or appears later – Previous work = work that you extend (readers must be familiar with it to understand your contribution) – Related work = work related to your work (readers can until later in the paper to know about it) • Tips: – Make sure not to miss important related work – Always safer to include more related work – Discuss the existing work and its connection to your work • Your work extends … • Your work is similar to … but differs in that … • Your work represents an alternative way of … – Whenever possible, explicitly discuss your contribution in the context of existing work 20
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Typical Structure of a Research Paper (cont.) • 2. Previous/Related work – Sometimes this part is included in the introduction or appears later – Previous work = work that you extend (readers must be familiar with it to understand your contribution) – Related work = work related to your work (readers can until later in the paper to know about it) • Tips: – Make sure not to miss important related work – Always safer to include more related work – Discuss the existing work and its connection to your work • Your work extends … • Your work is similar to … but differs in that … • Your work represents an alternative way of … – Whenever possible, explicitly discuss your contribution in the context of existing work 2008 © ChengXiang Zhai 59
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Journal Entries for Multiple Departments     Work in Process – Blanking Work in Process – Forming Work in Process – Finishing Factory Overhead  Work in Process – Blanking Work in Process – Forming Work in Process – Finishing Factory Overhead       xx xx Work in Process – Forming Finished Goods  xx Work in Process – Blanking Work in Process – Finishing  xx Work in Process – Finishing xx xx xx Record Factory Overhead Work in Process – Blanking Work in Process – Forming Work in Process – Finishing     xx Factory Overhead Work in Process – Forming  xx xx xx xx Transfers to Various Departments  xx xx xx xx Payroll   xx xx Various Accounts Factory Overhead – Blanking Factory Overhead – Forming Factory Overhead – Finishing    Record Direct Labor       xx xx xx xx Materials Factory Overhead  Record Direct Materials  Factory Overhead - Blanking Factory Overhead – Forming Factory Overhead – Finishing xx xx xx xx xx xx   BLANKING  FORMING  FINISHING Department Department Department
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HOT, FLAT, AND CROWDED THOMAS L FRIEDMAN 1. Why Citibank, Iceland’s Banks, and the Ice Banks of Antarctica All Melted Down at the Same Time Consumer America “At it’s core, the China-America growth engine worked like this: We in America built more and more stores, to sell more and more stuff, made in more and more Chinese factories, powered by more and more coal, and all those sales produced more dollars, which China used to buy more and more U.S. Treasure Bills, which allowed the Federal Reserve to extend more and more easy credit to more and more banks, consumers, and businesses, so that more and more Americans could purchase more and more homes, and all those sales drove home prices higher and higher,…” GHG Per Capita Emission Rates (tons): US 20 England, Japan 10 Average 4.3 India 1 Key World Energy Statistics 2008, World Energy Outlook
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Coordination of the Work-Study Program There is also one CFAO Work-Study Coordinator who manages the oversight of the entire workstudy program at NOVA. CFAO Work-Study Coordinator: • Works in the College Financial Aid Office. • Ensures that the program is in compliance with federal and institutional regulations. • Develops and implements work-study policies and procedures. • Sends work-study information to students and Campus Work-Study Coordinators. • Provides training to Campus Work-Study Coordinators and supervisors as necessary. • Manages and reconciles the college-wide work-study program budgets. • Verifies student eligibility and certifies all work-study awards. • Reviews Work-Study Agreements and employment documents before sending them to HR. • Notifies students, supervisors, and Campus Work-Study Coordinators if and when a student’s Work-Study Agreement is approved by the College Financial Aid Office. • Coordinates the America Reads Tutoring Program. • Serves as the Campus Work-Study Coordinator for College Staff in Pitney Bowes, Brault, & Fairfax.
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Technology References National Association of Social Workers. (2000). Technology and social work. In Social Work Speaks, NASW Policy Statements (pp. 292-295). Washington, DC: NASW Pres.   Ostashewski, N. & Reid, D. (2010). iPod, iPhone, and now iPad: The evolution of multimedia access in a mobile teaching context. In Proceedings of World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia and Telecommunications 2010 (pp. 2862-2864). Chesapeake, VA: AACE. Retrieved from http://www.editlib.org/p/35046 Smith, C. (2008). Technology and web-based support. Journal of Social Work Education, 44(3), 75-82.   Steyaert, J. & Gould, N. (2009). Social Work and the changing face of the digital divide. British Journal of Social Work, 39(4), 740-753. Reardon, C. (2010). Tech-savvy social work- meeting the digital demand. Social Work Today. Retrieved from http://www.socialworktoday.com/archive/072009p12.shtml Reardon, C. (2010). Data driven, people focused - Technology takes on social work, Social Work Today. Retrieved from http://www.socialworktoday.com/archive/111610p6.shtml Reardon, C. (2010). Social networking in addiction recovery – Raising hopes, concerns. Social Work Today. Retrieved from http://www.socialworktoday.com/archive/032210p8.shtml Robb, M. (2011). Pause before posting- using social media responsibly, Social Work Today. Retrieved from http://www.socialworktoday.com/archive/020911p8.shtml Whitaker, T., Torrico Meruvia, R. & Jones, A. (2010). Child welfare social workers’ attitudes toward mobile technology tools: Is there a generation gap? Washington, DC. NASW. Zhao, D. & Rosson, M.B. (2009) How and why people twitter: the role that micro-blogging plays in informal communication at work. In Proceedings of the ACM international conference on supporting group work.
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COMMENT DATA: MAKE BETTER? • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • more hours everything was great NA We need more time It helps me if the time is more the time is very short It can spend more time vocabulary, definitions, synonym, antonyms improve my grammar, writing and reading skills talk more slouly more hour for practice No, it was perfet/could you give more exercises to practices and the other workshops It is next time, I will have a better to understand the explanation more time definitely/I think is better 3 hours I would like to have more time in class • more time lo learn more • More hours for practice • I understood better/I really feel happy with this short classes • she has excellent knowledged/\could she make other workshop for us • maybe we need a more time • I think we need more days and more time • writing/more time • More important and increase my knowlege • add more hour
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The Hiring Process 2 How to Hire Work-Study Students 1) The student must be eligible for work-study and have a workstudy award posted on MyNOVA. Students should contact their Campus Work-Study Coordinator if they think they’re eligible, but have not been offered a work-study award. 2) Supervisors can re-hire former work-study students if they are still eligible or recruit new work-study students by posting position(s) on the Job-X website. Only students with workstudy awards on MyNOVA can submit an application on Job-X. 3) Supervisors interview work-study candidates and determine who they want to hire. 4) Supervisors complete Section B of the Work-Study Agreement (NVCC Form 125-175) with the student they want to hire. This form must then be submitted to the Campus Work-Study Coordinator. New work-study students who have not participated in the program within the last 12 months must also submit the work-study employment packet to their Campus Work-Study Coordinator. A new I-9 form is required if there has been more than a 30-day break in the student’s employment.
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Supervisor Responsibilities • Be a good supervisor! • Abide by and enforce the work-study program policies. • Treat all students fairly and remember that school is the student’s first priority, but students cannot be paid to study. • Interview work-study candidates and determine who you want to hire. • Agree upon a work-schedule and set clear expectations for the student up-front. • Complete Section B of the Work-Study Agreement and have the student return it to the Campus Work-Study Coordinator along with their employment packet. • Provide training, feedback, and enough work to keep the student busy. • Keep track of your work-study student’s earnings! Keep a log of all the hours approved. • Make sure students do not earn more than their work-study award and that they stop working when they’re required to. • Approve the student’s timesheet in HRMS by the date due in payroll. • Do not allow students to work more than 20 hours per week. • Submit a 105-45 if your student needs additional IT access. • Notify your Campus Work-Study Coordinator if a student stopped working. • Complete a performance evaluation of the student at the end of each semester. • Let your Campus Work-Study Coordinator know if you have any questions or concerns!
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Organization 1 offers the following recruitment package:   A. A competitive salary, with opportunities for promotion and bonuses based on performance B. Generous benefits package including a choice of medical programs, company-matched 401(k), stock options, maternity and paternity leave C1. Traditional Work Schedule - 8am-5pm work schedule C2. Flextime with Core Hours - Employees may work any preferred 8 hour shift but must be present for core work hours of 10am-3pm. C3. Flextime – Employees are free to work at any time they want as long as they get their work done. D1. Traditional Work Environment - Employees must work at the main work site and are not permitted to work at home. D2. Partial Flexplace – Employees may work from home via technology such as a computer up to 3 days a week. D3. Complete Flexplace - Employees may work from home via technology such as computer. NoaFlextime Flextime with Core Flextime no Core Hours Hours Complete A, B, C3, D1 A, B, C3, D2 A, B, C3, D3 Flexplace Some Flexplace A, B, C2, D1 A, B, C2, D2 A, B, C2, D3 No Flexplace A, B, C1, D1 A, B, C1, D2 A, B, C1, D3
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Gentry FBA Matrix Problem Behavior Off-task, Nondisruptive Function Peer Attention Replacement Behavior On-task, work completion Intervention      Off-task, Disruptive Peer Attention On-task, respectful responses, work completion       Off-task, Nondisruptive, work completion Escape (avoids teacher and peers during instruction) On-task, work completion     Off-task, Nondisruptive, work completion Attention (responds to On-task, work teacher directions, completion engages peers)      Off-task, Disruptive, Escape On-task, respectful  RRKS lesson Š Ņon-taskÓ Pre-correct @ start of class Self-monitor: on-task Periodic praiseby teacher for on-task Quick de-brief at end of class on self-monitoring RRKS lesson Š Ņon-taskÓ RRKS lesson Š Ņconflict management/respectÓ Pre-correct @ start of class Self-monitor: on-task & RRKS Periodic praiseby teacher for on-task Quick de-brief at end of class on self-monitoring RRKS lesson Š Ņon-taskÓ Pre-correct @ start of class Self-monitor: on-task + work completion Quick de-brief at end of class on self-monitoring RRKS lesson Š Ņon-taskÓ Pre-correct @ start of class Self-monitor: on-task + work completion Periodic praiseby teacher for on-task +work completion Quick de-brief at end of class on self-monitoring RRKS lesson Š Ņon-taskÓ Outcome for Replacement Behavior Earn time with peers for meeting self-management goals Earn time with peers for meeting self-management goals Earn a Ōskipa homeworkÕpass Earn other preferred activity for meeting self-management and work completion goals Earn Ņa work with peerÓactivity Earn other preferred activity for meeting self-management and work completion goals Earn a Ōskipa homeworkÕpass Lewis, 2008
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Adjustment of Work Schedules for Religious Observances • Employees whose personal religious beliefs require that he/she abstain from work at certain time of the work day/week, must be permitted to work alternative work hours. • Submit written request for adjusted work schedule (which must state for religious purposes) and articulate need to abstain from work. • Supervisor and employee should determine whether hours will be scheduled before or after the religious observance. Approval should not be granted until a schedule is agreed upon as to when employee will work to make up the time. • Employee should only be allowed to accumulate the number of hours of work needed to make up for absences from work for religious observances. • Overtime pay provisions of Title 5 do not apply to employees who work different hours or days because of religious observances. • Timekeeping Codes: CR: Religious Comp Time Earned CA: Religious Comp Time Taken
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Grading Letter Grade Percentage Performance A 93-100% Excellent Work A- 90-92% Nearly Excellent Work B+ 87-89% Very Good Work B 83-86% Good Work B- 80-82% Mostly Good Work C+ 77-79% Above Average Work C 73-76% Average Work C- 70-72% Mostly Average Work D+ 67-69% Below Average Work D 60-66% Poor Work F 0-59% Failing Work 9 9
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Work Groups: Scalable Cooperation • Divide monolithic work item array into work groups – Work items within a work group cooperate via shared memory, atomic operations and barrier synchronization – Work items in different work groups cannot cooperate work group 0 work items 0 1 2 3 4 5 work group 1 6 … int id = get_global_id(0); result[id] = a[id] + b [id]; … 7 8 9 10 11 12 work group 7 13 14 15 … int id = get_global_id(0); result[id] = a[id] + b [id]; … © Wen-mei W. Hwu and John Stone, Urbana July 22, 2010 56 … 57 58 59 60 61 62 … int id = get_global_id(0); result[id] = a[id] + b [id]; … 63
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Meet/Exceeds Standards (8-10) Approaching Standards (6-7) Less than adequate (4-5) Written work has weak beginning, development, and conclusion. Paragraphing and transitions are also deficient. Headings not clear or missing. Limited (0-3) Planning Written work has clear and appropriate beginning, development, and conclusion. Paragraphing and transitions are also clear and appropriate. Descriptive headings show writing plan. Written work has adequate beginning, development, and conclusion. Paragraphing and transitions are also adequate. Headings show writing plan. Developme nt The length of the written work provides in-depth coverage of the topic, and assertions are clearly supported by evidence, cited by in-text references and a source list in conventional format. No apparent plagiarism. The length of the written work is sufficient to cover the topic, and assertions are supported by evidence, cited by references and a conventional source list. No apparent plagiarism. Written work does not do an adequate job of covering the assigned topic, and assertions are weakly supported by evidence. Citations or source list missing or not consistently formatted. Possible plagiarism. Written work does not cover the assigned topic, and assertions are not supported by evidence. Citations and/or source list are missing. May have some cut and paste plagiarism. Mechanic s (Use ½ the points above in this section) (4-5) Written work has no major errors in word selection use, sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, and capitalization. (3) Written work is relatively free of errors in word selection and use, sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, and capitalization. (2) Written work has several major errors in word selection and use, sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, and capitalization. (0-1) Written work has serious and persistent errors in word selection and use, sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, and capitalization Organizational structure and paragraphing have serious and persistent errors. SCORE Out of 10 Out of 10 Out of 5
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Work-Study Agreement General Policies • • • • • • • • All work must occur on NOVA premises. Work hours cannot conflict with class time. Students must clock out for personal time, to eat, or to study. Students cannot work from home or in any other instance they cannot be supervised. A student cannot have any other paid position at NOVA while participating in the work-study program. Students may not work more than 20 hours per week. All work-study awards are contingent on the student’s continued eligibility, funding, and approval by HR and the CFAO. An offered work-study award is no guarantee that the student will be approved to work (funding may become exhausted before the student is approved to work, the student’s eligibility may change, the student may not find a supervisor who wants to hire him, etc.)
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OPERATIONS: STATEMENT OF GOALS FOR 2014-2015 Conference Services: Meet or Exceed Budget Revenue Goal of $360k - Based on what we have learned from our data, during FY’15 we plan to concentrate on: securing repeat customers (particularly larger groups), increase sales/marketing initiatives in the Greater DC area by establishing new contacts and reaching out to new groups that better fit our facility profile and mission. Limit camps and emphasizing corporate and educational conferences (targeting women 13 to 18) to better serve our long term fiscal needs and our mission. Trinity Center: Meet or Exceed Budget Revenue Goal of $566k - Based on an analysis of the data we recognize that the average total membership volume in FY’15 must increase from the low 400’s to an approximate target of 530. We have a plan to meet that goal. Efforts have already begun to increase revenue in areas that experienced shortfalls in FY’14. Specifically; special events, field rental, class revenue and basketball court revenue. Dining Services: Improve customer satisfaction - The data clearly indicates the need to maintain a consistent and a much higher level of customer satisfaction with campus dining. In FY’15 this will be accomplished by improving menu selections; improve food offerings (such as using more in- season local produce); increase special theme meals and improve communication with students. Progress will be measured by two Sodexo customer surveys to be conducted in FY’15. Bookstore: Slow the trend of declining textbook unit sales from -12% to -6% - The data clearly reports a declining trend in on campus textbook sales. To address the issue Barnes and Noble will better communicate to students their cost saving formats, on-line purchasing options and competitive pricing as an alternative to other available textbook purchasing options. We will investigate the option to implement the Barnes & Noble The Freshman Connection program which is a custom informational email campaign that is supported through social media and during on campus orientation sessions. The campaign seeks to educate students about their options for textbook savings (used, rental and digital) and answer questions about the textbook buying process, something that is new to a majority of first time college students. Where Barnes & Noble College has been allowed to deploy this messaging at similar sized institutions, it has generated additional revenue of between $14,000 and $44,000 annually. Facilities Services: Improve Work Order Response – After analyzing two years of work order system data, next year’s work order goals will focus on completing non-emergency work orders within 24 hours, (instead of the current 36) and continue to perform moving requests within 3 days. A specific effort will be made to work with the residential life staff to reduce their preventative maintenance work order requests by 20%. Main Hall work orders will be reduced by 10%. Work order related customer satisfaction survey information is now collected and quantified by Aramark management. The customer survey response rate of 3% is an area that needs significant improvement. Academic Center Construction Project: Meet schedule milestones – The data reflects that we have maintained a realistic but aggressive construction schedule. During the summer of 2014 we will continue to work with DC and local utilities in their permitting processes. Excavation is to begin in the fall of 2014. By the summer of 2015 we anticipate that the exterior building structure will be complete and the façade and roof work finalized. 83
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pH Scale 14 13 10,000,000 TIMES MORE ALKALINE 1,000,000 TIMES MORE ALKALINE 12 100,000 TIMES 11 10,000 TIMES 10 1,000 TIMES 9 8 STRAIGHTENERS 11.5 – 14.0 MORE ALKALINE. MORE ALKALINE MORE ALKALINE 100 TIMES MORE ALKALINE 10 TIMES MORE TINTS & TONERS 9.5 – 10.5 TINTS & TONERS 9.5 – 10.5 ALKALINE PERM SOLUTIONS 8.5 – 9.5 ALKALINE PERM SOLUTIONS 8.5 – 9.5 OIL BLEACHES 8.0 – 9.5 OIL BLEACHES 8.0 – 9.5 ALKALINE THAN 7 DISTILLED DISTILLED WATER WATER 7 7 6 10 TIMES MORE 5 100 TIMES ACID THAN 7 MORE ACID 4 1,000 TIMES MORE ACID 3 10,000 TIMES 2 100,000 TIMES 1 0 HYDROGEN PEROXIDE 3.5 – 4.0 HYDROGEN PEROXIDE 3.5 – 4.0 MORE ACID MORE ACID 1,000,000 TIMES FORMULA-A FORMULA-A ………………..Bac-Stat 0.75 MORE ACID 10,000,000 TIMES MORE ACID
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What is Work Time? • Work performed at home is time worked; a nonexempt employee should not perform work duties while at home without the supervisor’s permission; time spent performing work duties at home must be reported on the timesheet. • Time spent attending conferences, training, and orientation is reported as time worked; time spent networking, eating meals, relaxing or sleeping in the hotel room, etc. is not work time. Time spent performing work in the hotel room is work time. • An employee cannot volunteer on an unpaid basis to perform the same services performed in their regular job or performed by other employees for pay; unauthorized and unapproved work is work and must be reported as time worked. • A nonexempt employee who disregards the supervisor’s instructions regarding their work schedule of 40 hours per week will be subject to disciplinary action. Office of Human Resources | 5/11/2016 | 10
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