Disclosure Statements This presentation has been prepared by NantHealth, Inc. (the “Company”) for informational purposes only and not for any other purpose. Nothing contained in this presentation is, or should be construed as, a recommendation, promise or representation by the presenter or the Company or any director, employee, agent, or adviser of the Company. This presentation does not purport to be all-inclusive or to contain all of the information you may desire. Information provided in this presentation speaks only as of the date hereof. The Company assumes no obligation to update any information or statement after the date of this presentation as a result of new information, subsequent events or any other circumstances. These materials and related materials and discussions may contain forward-looking statements that are based on the Company’s current expectations, and projections and forecasts about future events and trends that the Company believes may affect its business, financial condition, operating results and growth prospects. Forward-looking statements are subject to substantial risks, uncertainties and other factors, including but not limited to (1) the structural change in the market for healthcare in the United States, including uncertainty in the healthcare regulatory framework and regulatory developments in the United States and foreign countries; (2) the evolving treatment paradigm for cancer, including physicians’ use of molecular information and targeted oncology therapeutics and the market size for molecular information products; (3) physicians’ need for precision medicine products and any perceived advantage of our solutions over those of our competitors, including the ability of our comprehensive platform to help physicians treat their patients’ cancers; (4) our ability to generate revenue from sales of products enabled by our molecular and biometric information platforms to physicians in clinical settings; (5) our ability to increase the commercial success of our sequencing and molecular analysis solution; (6) our plans or ability to obtain reimbursement for our sequencing and molecular analysis solution, including expectations as to our ability or the amount of time it will take to achieve successful reimbursement from third-party payors, such as commercial insurance companies and health maintenance organizations, and government insurance programs, such as Medicare and Medicaid; (7) our ability to effectively manage our growth, including the rate and degree of market acceptance of our solutions; and (8) our ability to offer new and innovative products and services, attract new partners and clients, estimate the size of our target market, and maintain and enhance our reputation and brand recognition. The Company undertakes no obligation to update any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise, except as required by applicable law. No representation or warranty, express or implied, is given as to the completeness or accuracy of the information or opinions contained in this document and neither the Company nor any of its directors, members, officers, employees, agents or advisers accepts any liability for any direct, indirect or consequential loss or damage arising from reliance on such information or opinions. Past performance should not be taken as an indication or guarantee of future performance, and no representation or warranty, express or implied, is made regarding future performance. We own or have rights to trademarks and service marks that we use in connection with the operation of our business. NantHealth, Inc. and our logo as well as other protected brands. Solely for convenience, our trademarks and service marks referred to in this presentation are listed without the (sm) and (TM) symbols, but we will assert, to the fullest extent under applicable law, our rights or the rights of the applicable licensors to these trademarks, service marks and trade names. Additionally, we do not intend for our use or display of other companies’ trade names, trademarks, or service marks to imply a relationship with, or endorsement or sponsorship of us by, these other companies. We have indicated with (TM) symbols where these third party trademarks are referred to in this presentation. This presentation includes certain financial measures not based on accounting principles generally accepted in the United States, or non-GAAP measures. These non-GAAP measures are in addition to, not a substitute for or superior to, measures of financial performance prepared in accordance with GAAP. Confidential Copyright © Do not distribute 6
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Starbucks Corporate Mission Statement Our Starbucks Mission Statement Our mission: to inspire and nurture the human spirit – one person, one cup and one neighborhood at a time. Here are the principles of how we live that every day: Our Coffee It has always been, and will always be, about quality. We’re passionate about ethically sourcing the finest coffee beans, roasting them with great care, and improving the lives of people who grow them. We care deeply about all of this; our work is never done. Our Partners We’re called partners, because it’s not just a job, it’s our passion. Together, we embrace diversity to create a place where each of us can be ourselves. We always treat each other with respect and dignity. And we hold each other to that standard. Our Customers When we are fully engaged, we connect with, laugh with, and uplift the lives of our customers – even if just for a few moments. Sure, it starts with the promise of a perfectly made beverage, but our work goes far beyond that. It’s really about human connection. Our Stores When our customers feel this sense of belonging, our stores become a haven, a break from the worries outside, a place where you can meet with friends. It’s about enjoyment at the speed of life – sometimes slow and savored, sometimes faster. Always full of humanity. Our Neighborhood Every store is part of a community, and we take our responsibility to be good neighbors seriously. We want to be invited in wherever we do business. We can be a force for positive action – bringing together our partners, customers, and the community to contribute every day. Now we see that our responsibility – and our potential for good – is even larger. The world is looking to Starbucks to set the new standard, yet again. We will lead. Our Shareholders We know that as we deliver in each of these areas, we enjoy the kind of success that rewards our shareholders. We are fully accountable to get each of these elements right so that Starbucks – and everyone it touches – can endure and thrive. © 2014 Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part, except for use as permitted in a license distributed with a certain product or service or otherwise on a password-protected website for classroom use. 4–9
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Existing Strategies & Performance Our core business is our trading and investing customer franchise. Building on the strengths of this franchise, our growth strategy is focused on four areas: retail brokerage, corporate services and market making, wealth management, and banking.     • Our retail brokerage business is our foundation. We believe a focus on these key factors will position us for future growth in this business: growing our sales force with a focus on long-term investing, optimizing our marketing spend, continuing to develop innovative products and services and minimizing account attrition.     • Our corporate services and market making businesses enhance our strategy by allowing us to realize additional economic benefit from our retail brokerage business. Our corporate services business is a leading provider of software and services for managing equity compensation plans and is an important source of new retail brokerage accounts. Our market making business allows us to increase the economic benefit on the order flow from the retail brokerage business as well as generate additional revenues through external order flow.     • We also plan to expand our wealth management offerings. Our vision is to provide wealth management services that are enabled by innovative technology and supported by guidance from professionals when needed.     • Our retail brokerage business generates a significant amount of customer cash and we plan to continue to utilize our bank to optimize the value of these customer deposits.
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Building Emergency Team Building Emergency Team for Student Services Center In the event of an emergency evacuation, each Building Emergency Team (BET) member will be responsible for contacting individuals indicated in the chart below. Office of the AVP Itza Sanchez, Snr. Building Coordinator, SSC Office of the Associate Vice President Enrollment Services Work: 4- 2551 Mobile: 408-595-6213 E-mail: [email protected] Alt: Lois Mardis, ASPIRE/McNAIR Work: 4-2637 E-mail: [email protected] Office of Pre-College Programs Tom Reisz Work: 4-3221 E-mail: [email protected] Alt: Blanca Sanchez Work: 4-2572 Email: [email protected] Learning Assistance Resource Center (LARC) Alice Ting Work: 4-2589 E-mail: [email protected] Alt: Lan Ngo Work: 4-2546 E-mail: [email protected] Office of the Bursars Satish Patel Work: 4-1620 E-mail: [email protected] Alt: Betty Jo Alexander Work: 4-1623 E-mail: [email protected] Office of Financial Aid and Scholarships (FASO) Jared Blanton Work:4-6072 E-mail: [email protected] Alt: Francisco Marquez Work: 4-6091 E-mail: [email protected] Academic Advising and Retention Services (AARS) Lael Adediji Work: 4-2511 E-mail: [email protected] Alt: Cindy Kato Work: 4-1537 E-mail: [email protected] Systems/Grad Admissions Kirk Nguyen Work: 4-2537 E-mail: [email protected] Alt: Vicki Robison Work: 4-3356 E-mail: [email protected] Office of the Registrar Darcel Wood Work: 4-2095 E-mail: [email protected] Alt: Roselia Lobato-Morales Work: 4-2553 E-mail: [email protected] Undergraduate Admissions Gloria Milano Work: 4-2097 E-mail: [email protected] Alt: Joy Vickers Work: 4-2023 E-mail: [email protected] Student Outreach and Recruitment (SOAR) & Communications Kelly Pjesky Work: 4-2576 Email: [email protected] Alt: Joe Pinheiro Work: 4-2075 E-mail: [email protected] updated: 8/4/10
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OUR BELIEFS The success of our students is always our first priority We must perform our jobs admirably, giving our best service and support every day, for everyone Teamwork is founded upon people bringing different gifts and perspectives We provide educational opportunities for those who might otherwise not have them In providing employees with a safe and fulfilling work environment, as well as an opportunity to grow and learn Our progress must be validated by setting goals and measuring our achievements We must make decisions that are best for the institution as a whole Building and maintaining trusting relationships with each other is essential Competence and innovation are essential means of sustaining our values in a competitive marketplace We make a positive difference in the lives of our students, our employees, and our communities In the principles of integrity, opportunity and fairness We must prepare our students to be successful in a global environment Our work matters 6
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Entrepreneurship: is it good enough to be social? John F. McVea and Michael J. Naughton Introduction • The term Social Entrepreneurship has experienced a huge growth in influence over that last decade. The literature proposes a number of advantages to social entrepreneurship as a frame of reference: • Promoting innovation within non-profits • Leveraging and focusing scarce philanthropic resources • Faster response to strategic challenges • Infusion of business skills to non-business world • Involvement of non government assets in social problems • Creation of hybrid (blurred) organizations between for profit and non profit worlds. It is widely observed that practice has outpaced theoretical development leading to little agreement on definitions or frameworks for social entrepreneurship. We believe that widespread and unchallenged acceptance of the term Social Entrepreneurship masks some dangers and has contributed to confusion in the field. We believe that if we apply some insights from Catholic Social Teaching to the issue of social entrepreneurship we can move beyond the false dichotomy of Entrepreneurship/ Social Entrepreneurship and identify three specific entrepreneurial strategies which support a more robust discussion of the nature of the work that is entrepreneurship. We believe that the field would benefit from spending less time discussing social entrepreneurship and more time discussion the nature of the good entrepreneur. • • • • • The dangers of naïve acceptance of Social Entrepreneurship • • • The rhetorical risk: • Narrow definition: if S.E. is simply used to rebrand non-profits then much of the value of the new activities, hybrid design, stimulation of new resources and innovation is lost. • Implied dichotomy: if “good” ventures are termed “social” it can imply that other forms of entrepreneurship are “asocial” or “anti social” • Boundarylessness: In contrast, if all business activities are deemed “social”, to some degree or other, then the term loses all meaning focus on the distinctive phenomenon that is S.E. Despite these risks we are more concerned with a risk beyond rhetoric; the risk of undermining the meaning of work, particularly from the perspective of Catholic Social Teaching. While this perspective is drawn from the Catholic tradition, accepting the content of CST does not require acceptance of Catholic faith (Guitan, 2009). The three goods of social entrepreneurship • We are concerned by the side-effects of a concentration thesis that suggests that the moral responsibilities of entrepreneurship can be concentrated in a subset of businesses called social enterprises, presumably leaving other enterprise to simply concentrate on serving themselves. • We are concerned by the impact such a concentration thesis could have on the conception of the meaning of work beyond the world of social enterprise. • We are concerned with how such an approach can focus attention solely on the altruistic contributions of entrepreneurial ventures as the sole measure of their contribution to the Common Good • Instead we propose that, rather than trying to determine the difference between entrepreneurship and social entrepreneurship, it would be more productive to focus on the questions “What is Good Entrepreneurship? What action and activities define that goodness?” • We further propose that, by apply the perspective of Catholic Social Teaching, we can identify three specific strategies through which entrepreneurial ventures may contribute to the Common Good thus suggesting that good entrepreneurship requires a focus on: 1. Good Goods. The primary way an entrepreneurial venture can contribute to the Common Good is by bringing into existence new products and services which are inherently good and which enrich lives and minimize any unintended harms. This can include what we call the “entrepreneurship of the mundane”, that is, the manufacture of the nuts and bolts and basic necessities of life as well as the creation of life saving treatments. However, inclusion of good goods as a primary moral contribution of entrepreneurship must also require of the entrepreneur analysis of what goods are not good, and what aspects of even good goods should be redesigned or rethought in order to minimize unintended consequences. We find, in our discussions, that this is a much under appreciated dimension of the good of entrepreneurship. 2. Good Work. The second way an entrepreneurial venture can contribute to the Common Good is through the nature of the work that is carried out by the venture. This dimension has several aspects both internal and external to the entrepreneur: • The development of good character in the entrepreneur. This aspect of the good is derived from the subjective dimension of work, that is, just as how-we-work ends up changing the world, so working-on-the-world changes us. Most professionals spend the majority of their waking hours at work. As habits, character and wisdom are developed through experience and activity, for the entrepreneur, doing good work is an important opportunity to develop character. Society as a whole is better off for having good, successful entrepreneurial leaders who, through that calling, can become leaders of character. This dimension of the entrepreneurial good is widely unappreciated even by entrepreneurs themselves • Good relations with employees, customers and other stakeholders. Value creation and trade creates opportunities for the building of social relationships. The central question is “Are you in good relation with those with whom you create value?’ Do your employees have opportunity to develop as people? 3. Good Wealth. The third way the good entrepreneur can contribute to the Common Good is through the creation of good wealth. Good wealth requires a balance of reward for labor/ creativity with the provision of a living wage to all. Good wealth is often captured by individual action but has social strings attached. From the CST perspective the creation of good wealth implies a particular solidarity with the poor. One way to contribute to the common good is to donate altruistically to those in need. But even here, altruism is only one of a number of possible strategies. Good entrepreneurs may also contribute by donating their time or their particular skills. Indeed, since the donation of time and work often requires physical interaction with those in need, it often generates a solidarity of far greater integrity. Finally, it must be emphasized that altruism, for the entrepreneur, is always dependent, indeed subsequent to the creation of good wealth in the first place. Literature cited Alvord, Sarah, David L. Brown, and Christine W. Letts, 2004. “Social Entrepreneurship and Societal Transformation: An Exploratory Study,” The Journal of Applied Behavioral Science. 40:260. Benedict XVI, Caritas et veritate,   Boschee, Jerr. 1998 “What does it take to be a social entrepreneur?” National Centre for Social Entrepreneurs (www.socialentrepreneurs.org/whatdoes/html), 5pp.   Cannon, Carl. 2000. “Charity for profit: how the new social entrepreneurs are creating good by sharing wealth” National Journal, June 16: 1898-1904.   Christie, Michael and Benson Honig. 2006. “Social entrepreneurship: New research findings.” Journal of World Business. 41: 1-5.   Dees, Gregory, J., 1998. “The Meaning of ‘Social Entrepreneurship,’” Original Draft: 10/3.   Drucker, P.F. 1985. Innovation and Entrepreneurship. New York: Harper & Row.   Fowler, Alan. “NGDOs as a moment in history: beyond aid to social entrepreneurship or civic innovation?” Third World Quarterly, 21(4): 637-654.   Gregg, S. and G. Preece: 1999, Christianity and Entrepreneurship (The Centre for Independent Studies Limited, St. Leonards, NSW, Australia).   Hibbert, Sally A., Gillian Hogg and Theresa Quinn. “Consumer response to social entrepreneurship: The case of the Big Issue in Scotland.” International Journal of Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Marketing. 7(3): 288-301.   Johnson, Sherrill, 2000. “Literature Review on Social Entrepreneurship,” Canadian Center for social Entrepreneurship. (http://www.bus.ualberta.ca/ccse/Publications/).   John Paul II, Pope.: 1992 Laborem Exercens (On Human Work): 1981, in D. J. O’Brien and T. A. Shannon, (eds.), Catholic Social Thought (Orbis Books, Maryknoll, NY).   John Paul II, Pope.: 1992 Sollicitudo Rei Socialis (On Social Concern): 1987 in D. J. O’Brien and T. A. Shannon, (eds.), Catholic Social Thought (Orbis Books, Maryknoll, NY).   Kennedy, R., G, Atkinson, and M. Naughton, (eds.): 1994, Dignity of Work: John Paul II Speaks To Managers and Workers (University Press of America, Lanham, Maryland).   Mair, Johanna and Ernesto Noboa, 2003. “Social Entrepreneurship: How Intentions to Create a Social Enterprise get Formed,” IESE Business School.   Mair, Johanna and Ignasi Marti, 2006. “Social entrepreneurship research: A source of explanation, prediction, and delight,” Journal of World Business. 41: 36-44.   Melé, D.:2001, ‘A Challenge for Business Enterprises: Introducing the Primacy of the Subjective Meaning of Work in Work Organization’, (http://www.stthomas.edu/cathstudies/cst/mgmt/le/papers/mele.htm) Conclusions We have argued that, while there is great promise in the contemporary social entrepreneurship movement, there are also a number of important dangers. We propose that, if we confront rather than acquiesce to these dangers, we can use the perspective of Catholic Social Teaching to broaden the scope of entrepreneurial ventures that we study, to enrich the moral dimension of entrepreneurial strategy and to deepen the teaching of entrepreneurship as a whole. We recommend the following to move toward these contributions: • Incorporate social entrepreneurship into entrepreneurship in a way that enhances the three goods of entrepreneurship. Specifically we propose replacing the questions “What is social entrepreneurship?” with the questions “What does it mean to be a Good entrepreneur?” From this perspective we can then apply what we have called the three goods of entrepreneurship as a means of supplying critical challenge and inspiration to all forms of entrepreneurship such that the true moral dimension of this critical force in our lives comes into fruition. • Encourage research within the entrepreneurship discipline that addresses traditional social entrepreneurial issues such as micro lending, fair trade products, etc. • Develop bridge courses such as Theo/Cath 306 which help students understand and experience the meaning of the good entrepreneur as well as connect students to the spiritual and moral principles of a good entrepreneur. • Expose entrepreneurship students to so-called social entrepreneurs as well so-called conventional good entrepreneurs so they can see the spectrum of entrepreneurial activities. © File copyright Colin Purrington. You may use for making your poster, of course, but please do not plagiarize, adapt, or put on your own site. Also, do not upload this file, even if modified, to third-party file-sharing sites such as doctoc.com. If you have insatiable need to post a template onto your own site, search the internet for a different template to steal. File downloaded from http://colinpurrington.com/tips/ academic/posterdesign. Acknowledgments I am indebted to Michael Naughton and Laura Dunham for their reflections and thoughts on this paper.
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Coordination of the Work-Study Program There are 1-2 Campus Work-Study Coordinators on each campus who oversee the work-study program on their campus. Campus Work-Study Coordinators: • Work in the Campus Financial Aid Office. • Serve as the primary contact for students and supervisors to answer work-study questions. • Advertise the work-study program and help recruit work-study students. • Disseminate work-study information throughout the year to supervisors and students. • Keep track of the current status of all work-study students on their campus. • Monitor their campus work-study funding levels. • Determine work-study eligibility and request work-study awards for eligible students. • Assist students with completing the work-study employment paperwork. • Assist supervisors with using the Job-X website to hire new work-study students. • Collect and review all work-study employment documents from students and supervisors.
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Guiding Questions We’ll use questions to ensure our focus is appropriate, and to evaluate individual issues in the equity lens framework. ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● Are the tone, word choice, layout, and graphics of our “public face” in alignment with our movement toward access, equity, and inclusion? Are the tone, word choice, layout, and graphics of our “internal” face in alignment with our movement toward access, equity, and inclusion? Have we created a safe environment to participate in Equity Lens work? Are we aware of the ways in which our equity lens is impacted by our individual, institutional, and systemic biases? Does the work resulting from our equity lens foster improvement at all of the following levels: individual, institutional and systemic? Do we have structures in place to ensure that the work resulting from the equity lens is collaborative and transparent across the institution? What assessment mechanisms have we built into the equity lens that will allow for continual improvement of both the lens and the work resulting from it as we move forward? What are the specific ways that Lane’s Equity Lens is expected to reduce disparities and enhance access, equity, and inclusion? Can we realistically meet the goals of access, equity, and inclusion framed by the equity lens? Have we clearly articulated Lane’s Equity Lens and expectations to all stakeholders? How are we going to get buy-in across campus? Have we ensured that Lane’s Equity Lens can help us heal and transform our structures, environments, and selves?
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OPERATIONS: STATEMENT OF GOALS FOR 2014-2015 Conference Services: Meet or Exceed Budget Revenue Goal of $360k - Based on what we have learned from our data, during FY’15 we plan to concentrate on: securing repeat customers (particularly larger groups), increase sales/marketing initiatives in the Greater DC area by establishing new contacts and reaching out to new groups that better fit our facility profile and mission. Limit camps and emphasizing corporate and educational conferences (targeting women 13 to 18) to better serve our long term fiscal needs and our mission. Trinity Center: Meet or Exceed Budget Revenue Goal of $566k - Based on an analysis of the data we recognize that the average total membership volume in FY’15 must increase from the low 400’s to an approximate target of 530. We have a plan to meet that goal. Efforts have already begun to increase revenue in areas that experienced shortfalls in FY’14. Specifically; special events, field rental, class revenue and basketball court revenue. Dining Services: Improve customer satisfaction - The data clearly indicates the need to maintain a consistent and a much higher level of customer satisfaction with campus dining. In FY’15 this will be accomplished by improving menu selections; improve food offerings (such as using more in- season local produce); increase special theme meals and improve communication with students. Progress will be measured by two Sodexo customer surveys to be conducted in FY’15. Bookstore: Slow the trend of declining textbook unit sales from -12% to -6% - The data clearly reports a declining trend in on campus textbook sales. To address the issue Barnes and Noble will better communicate to students their cost saving formats, on-line purchasing options and competitive pricing as an alternative to other available textbook purchasing options. We will investigate the option to implement the Barnes & Noble The Freshman Connection program which is a custom informational email campaign that is supported through social media and during on campus orientation sessions. The campaign seeks to educate students about their options for textbook savings (used, rental and digital) and answer questions about the textbook buying process, something that is new to a majority of first time college students. Where Barnes & Noble College has been allowed to deploy this messaging at similar sized institutions, it has generated additional revenue of between $14,000 and $44,000 annually. Facilities Services: Improve Work Order Response – After analyzing two years of work order system data, next year’s work order goals will focus on completing non-emergency work orders within 24 hours, (instead of the current 36) and continue to perform moving requests within 3 days. A specific effort will be made to work with the residential life staff to reduce their preventative maintenance work order requests by 20%. Main Hall work orders will be reduced by 10%. Work order related customer satisfaction survey information is now collected and quantified by Aramark management. The customer survey response rate of 3% is an area that needs significant improvement. Academic Center Construction Project: Meet schedule milestones – The data reflects that we have maintained a realistic but aggressive construction schedule. During the summer of 2014 we will continue to work with DC and local utilities in their permitting processes. Excavation is to begin in the fall of 2014. By the summer of 2015 we anticipate that the exterior building structure will be complete and the façade and roof work finalized. 83
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Evaluators are provided with a Rubric to assist in assessment Component Possible 100 Points Outstanding 25 Points Highly Successful 20 Points Successful 15 Points Minimally Successful 10 Points Unsuccessful 5 Points Technique Exceptional understanding of different media and their uses. Work exhibits mastery of a very wide range of visual arts techniques extending well beyond academic exercises. Very good understanding of different media and their uses. Work exhibits very good control in a broad range of visual arts techniques. Understandin g of different media and their uses is present. Work exhibits general competence in a variety of visual arts techniques. Understanding of different media and their uses is inconsistently evident. Work is occasionally competent in a few techniques. Understanding of different media and their uses is not evident. Work exhibits only very limited or very rare use of appropriate visual arts techniques. Design Exceptional understanding of the elements of design and composition and these are used skillfully and effectively to communicate highly sophisticated ideas. Very good understanding of the elements of design and composition and they are used very well to communicate important ideas. Understandin g of the elements of design and composition is present and they are used to communicate ideas in most instances. Understanding of elements of design and composition occasionally present. Communication of ideas occurs irregularly or in unintentional ways. Understanding of the elements of design and composition is not evident. Communication of ideas occurs rarely and is incomplete or unintended when it does. Creativity and Concept Work is highly unique and original; presents compelling and focused conceptualizations of ideas. Work is unique and original; presents interesting and clear conceptualiza tions ideas. Work is mostly unique and original; presents some interesting and clear conceptualiza tions of ideas. Work is sometimes unique or original; presents occasionally interesting or clear conceptualizati ons of ideas. Work is obviously derivative and unoriginal; does not present any interesting or clear ideas. Presentation Work exhibits mastery of presentation skills and materials without any errors. Work exhibits appropriate use of presentation skills and materials without significant errors. Work generally exhibits appropriate presentation skills and materials with few errors. Work exhibits some presentation skills and materials with several noticeable errors. Work exhibits inappropriate presentation skills and materials with many critical errors. Learning Outcomes that are assessed by evaluators: • • • • Technique Design Creativity and Concept Presentation Students are identified by number to aid in anonymity and limit the subjective nature of the evaluation process. The critics’ comments pertaining to course assignments and curriculum development are discussed in department and advisory board meetings. The Special Project Leader of Design in cooperation with the department chair may choose to incorporate this information
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Homework – Scoring and Grading • Each HW Package contains 3 or more Sections • You SCORE each section, pass in the Package • I check your accuracy and GRADE your Package 0-10 staple Work 8 Work 106 Package #1Work Work 43 45 Work work Work Work Work 27 23 xx 32 Your name 1.3 1-25odd, … {32} Work work Your name 1.2 1-21odd, … {45} Work 31 work Your name 31 1.1 1-31odd, … {31} work Work Work 9 Your name 18 1.4 1-31odd, … {18}
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Typical Structure of a Research Paper (cont.) • 2. Previous/Related work – Sometimes this part is included in the introduction or appears later – Previous work = work that you extend (readers must be familiar with it to understand your contribution) – Related work = work related to your work (readers can until later in the paper to know about it) • Tips: – Make sure not to miss important related work – Always safer to include more related work – Discuss the existing work and its connection to your work • Your work extends … • Your work is similar to … but differs in that … • Your work represents an alternative way of … – Whenever possible, explicitly discuss your contribution in the context of existing work 20
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Typical Structure of a Research Paper (cont.) • 2. Previous/Related work – Sometimes this part is included in the introduction or appears later – Previous work = work that you extend (readers must be familiar with it to understand your contribution) – Related work = work related to your work (readers can until later in the paper to know about it) • Tips: – Make sure not to miss important related work – Always safer to include more related work – Discuss the existing work and its connection to your work • Your work extends … • Your work is similar to … but differs in that … • Your work represents an alternative way of … – Whenever possible, explicitly discuss your contribution in the context of existing work 2008 © ChengXiang Zhai 59
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Journal Entries for Multiple Departments     Work in Process – Blanking Work in Process – Forming Work in Process – Finishing Factory Overhead  Work in Process – Blanking Work in Process – Forming Work in Process – Finishing Factory Overhead       xx xx Work in Process – Forming Finished Goods  xx Work in Process – Blanking Work in Process – Finishing  xx Work in Process – Finishing xx xx xx Record Factory Overhead Work in Process – Blanking Work in Process – Forming Work in Process – Finishing     xx Factory Overhead Work in Process – Forming  xx xx xx xx Transfers to Various Departments  xx xx xx xx Payroll   xx xx Various Accounts Factory Overhead – Blanking Factory Overhead – Forming Factory Overhead – Finishing    Record Direct Labor       xx xx xx xx Materials Factory Overhead  Record Direct Materials  Factory Overhead - Blanking Factory Overhead – Forming Factory Overhead – Finishing xx xx xx xx xx xx   BLANKING  FORMING  FINISHING Department Department Department
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Coordination of the Work-Study Program There is also one CFAO Work-Study Coordinator who manages the oversight of the entire workstudy program at NOVA. CFAO Work-Study Coordinator: • Works in the College Financial Aid Office. • Ensures that the program is in compliance with federal and institutional regulations. • Develops and implements work-study policies and procedures. • Sends work-study information to students and Campus Work-Study Coordinators. • Provides training to Campus Work-Study Coordinators and supervisors as necessary. • Manages and reconciles the college-wide work-study program budgets. • Verifies student eligibility and certifies all work-study awards. • Reviews Work-Study Agreements and employment documents before sending them to HR. • Notifies students, supervisors, and Campus Work-Study Coordinators if and when a student’s Work-Study Agreement is approved by the College Financial Aid Office. • Coordinates the America Reads Tutoring Program. • Serves as the Campus Work-Study Coordinator for College Staff in Pitney Bowes, Brault, & Fairfax.
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Technology References National Association of Social Workers. (2000). Technology and social work. In Social Work Speaks, NASW Policy Statements (pp. 292-295). Washington, DC: NASW Pres.   Ostashewski, N. & Reid, D. (2010). iPod, iPhone, and now iPad: The evolution of multimedia access in a mobile teaching context. In Proceedings of World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia and Telecommunications 2010 (pp. 2862-2864). Chesapeake, VA: AACE. Retrieved from http://www.editlib.org/p/35046 Smith, C. (2008). Technology and web-based support. Journal of Social Work Education, 44(3), 75-82.   Steyaert, J. & Gould, N. (2009). Social Work and the changing face of the digital divide. British Journal of Social Work, 39(4), 740-753. Reardon, C. (2010). Tech-savvy social work- meeting the digital demand. Social Work Today. Retrieved from http://www.socialworktoday.com/archive/072009p12.shtml Reardon, C. (2010). Data driven, people focused - Technology takes on social work, Social Work Today. Retrieved from http://www.socialworktoday.com/archive/111610p6.shtml Reardon, C. (2010). Social networking in addiction recovery – Raising hopes, concerns. Social Work Today. Retrieved from http://www.socialworktoday.com/archive/032210p8.shtml Robb, M. (2011). Pause before posting- using social media responsibly, Social Work Today. Retrieved from http://www.socialworktoday.com/archive/020911p8.shtml Whitaker, T., Torrico Meruvia, R. & Jones, A. (2010). Child welfare social workers’ attitudes toward mobile technology tools: Is there a generation gap? Washington, DC. NASW. Zhao, D. & Rosson, M.B. (2009) How and why people twitter: the role that micro-blogging plays in informal communication at work. In Proceedings of the ACM international conference on supporting group work.
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Unqualified (= “clean”) Opinion by the Independent Auditors Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm (link from finance.yahoo.com to Form 10-K, SEC Independent auditors: document, pp. 181)   “Nothing is wrong with the financial statements.”    To the Board of Directors and Shareholders of Merck & Co., Inc.:   In our opinion, the accompanying consolidated balance sheets and the related consolidated statements of income, of equity and of cash flows present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of Merck & Co., Inc. and its subsidiaries at December 31, 2009 and December 31, 2008, and the results of their operations and their cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended December 31, 2009 in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America. Also in our opinion, Merck maintained, in all material respects, effective internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2009, based on criteria established in Internal Control — Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO). Merck’s management is responsible for these financial statements, for maintaining effective internal control over financial reporting and for its assessment of the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting, included in Management’s Report under Item 9A. Our responsibility is to express opinions on these financial statements and on Merck’s internal control over financial reporting based on our integrated audits. We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audits to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement and whether effective internal control over financial reporting was maintained in all material respects. Our audits of the financial statements included examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements, assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, and evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. Our audit of internal control over financial reporting included obtaining an understanding of internal control over financial reporting, assessing the risk that a material weakness exists, and testing and evaluating the design and operating effectiveness of internal control based on the assessed risk. Our audits also included performing such other procedures as we considered necessary in the circumstances. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinions.         PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP Florham Park New Jersey February 26, 2010 Independent Auditors
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