5. Mean projections and mean student scores are calculated. Student Projection1 Student Score 1 Student Projection 2 Student Score 2 Student Projection 3 Student Score 3 Student Projection 4 Student Score 4 Student Projection 5 Your School Student Score 5 Student Projection 6 Student Score 6 Student Projection 7 Student Score 7 Student Projection 8 Student Score 8 Student Projection 9 Student Score 9 Student Projection 10 Student Score 10 Student Projection 11 Student Score 11 Student Projection 12 Student Score 12 Student Projection 13 Student Score 13 Student Projection 14 Student Score 14 Student Projection 15 Student Score 15 Student Projection 16 Student Score 16 Student Projection 17 Student Score 17 Student Projection 18 Student Score 18 Student Projection 19 Student Score 19 Student Projection 20 Student Score 20 Mean Projected Score Mean Student Score Copyright © 2003. Battelle for Kids
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Level II Placements 1st Rotation 2nd Rotation FW Site 1 1 Student 1- 1st Choice 1 Student 2- 1st Choice FW Site 1 1 Student 1- 1st 0 Student 2- 1st FW Site 2 1 Student 2- 1st Choice Student 3- 2nd Choice Student 4- 3rd Choice 1 Student A- 1st Student B- 2nd choice Student C- 3rd Choice FW Site 3 1 Student 4- 1st Choice Student 5- 1st Choice Student 6- 1st Choice Student 7-2nd Choice Student 8- 2nd Choice Student 9- 3rd Choice 1 Student 2- 1st Student 3- 1st Student 4- 1st Student 5- 1st Student 6- 1st Student 7- 1st FW Site 4 0 Student 10- 1st 0 Student 11- 1st Choice FW Site 5 1 No Student 1 No Student FW Site 6 1 No Student 1 Student 11- 1st Student 12- 1st Lake Charles MC with free housing
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Workday @ Yale – Organization Structure for Vision/Plan Phase Officers Steering Committee Shauna King (Executive Sponsor) Cynthia Smith (Provost office) Julie Grant (Business Operations) Len Peters (ITS) Nancy Creel-Gross (HR) Steve Murphy (Finance) John Mayes (Change Leadership) Advisor Groups Faculty Lifecycle Ernie Huff Cynthia Walker Cynthia Smith A-M Hummerstone Kathy Schoonmaker Donna Cable Joe Crosby Other Professional Schools TBD Deloitte Advisory Team Higher Education Lead: Kathy Karich Workday Lead: TBD Workday Advisor: David Hom HR Transformation: Walt Sokoll Finance Transformation: Walter Porter Strategy Advisor: Mark Price Sponsored Awards Advisor: David Stahler Kathie Schwerdtfeger Business Intelligence Advisor: Rishi Agarwal Program Leadership Business Program Lead Jacqueline Tucker Sponsored Awards Andrew Rudczynski Alice Tangredi-Hannon Joanne Bentley Cynthia Walker IT Program Lead Marc Ulan Program Management & Control Ryan Schlagheck Gregory Baker • Program Management Analyst Susan Pacini • Program Management Coordinator Grace Frith • PMO Analyst Sam Morgan • Workday Customer Success Manager Karla Davenport-Gratzol HCM / Payroll Workstream Finance Workstream Nancy Creel-Gross Fred Giacoma Lucy Lucker Nate Groves • HCM Lead 1 Judy Offutt • HCM Lead 2 Jodi McCullagh • HCM Core HR Lead Jaci-Beth Ward • HCM Compensation Lead Corey Rossman • Payroll Lead Beth Anderson • Faculty Life Cycle Lead TBC-Anna Maria Hummerstone • Faculty Life Cycle Analyst Hadar Call • Faculty Life Cycle Analyst Millie Anderson • HCM Solution Architect Johanna Ritch • Payroll Solution Architect Charles Williamson • HCM Consultant Brian Harvey • HCM / Payroll Subject Matter Advisors TBD • General Accounting Lead Andy Sgambato • Business Information Model Lead Liz Bilodeau • Procurement, AP & Expense Lead Rob Bores • Sponsored Awards Management Lead Tracy Walters • Gifts Lead Chris Watkins • Sponsored Awards Management Analyst Michele Greenhouse • Procurement, AP & Expense Analyst Rodney Brunson • Financial Accounting / Projects / BIM Solution Architect Shanna Arnold • Grants / AR / Procurement / Suppliers Solution Architect Kashaka Nedd • Financial Accounting / BIM / Grants Subject Matter Advisors TBD • Financials Analyst Ross Galloway • Sponsored Awards Management / Controls Solution Architect Jason Jacobs • Solution Architect Matt Luby Cheryl Chinen BI/DW & Reporting Workstream Functional Lead: Lourdes Reyes Technical Lead: M. Satterwhite/ K. Broderick/Andrew Dinin • Technical Architect Shane Anderson • Business Analyst (FIN) Karen Rosset • Business Analyst (HCM/Pay) Ron Lipkins • Technical Analyst 1 Poojitha Kuraganti • Technical Analyst 2 Francis Garcia • Technical Analyst 3 Faith Yen • BI/DW Functional Solution Architect Biju Yohannan • BI/DW Technical Solution Architect TBD • BI/DW Data Architect TBD • BI/DW Reporting Architect Ross Dodd Technology Workstream Security & Controls Workstream Change Management Workstream Darrell Cook Andrew Dinin Karen Rosset Richard Rudnicki TBD Andrea Lee • Technical Architect Shane Anderson • Integration Analyst (HCM/Pay) Brian Young • Integration Analyst (HCM/Pay) Robert Goclowski • Integration Analyst (FIN) David Griesbach Kevin Quigley • Integration Analyst Igor Budyansky • Testing Manager Jason Shuff • Testing Support TBD • Integrations & Conversion Analyst (YSM) Steve Fielding Bobbie Routhier • Conversion Manager Kirsten Daly • IT Project Manager TBD-Revisit Sept’13 • Integration Analyst – Andrew Blakeslee • Conversion Analyst – TBD • Testing Analyst – TBD • Integration Developer – Samir Joshi • IAM Analyst Josh Nabozny (Interim) • Security & Controls Analyst John DeNezzo • IAM / Workday Technical Subject Matter Advisors TBD • Security and Controls Subject Matter Advisors TBD Service Group Leadership Brent Dickman (Interim) • Change Management Generalist Janice Murphy-Wallace • Communications Specialist Mark Lackowski • Change Management Consultant Cara Burgess Black font = Requested Yale Resources Blue font = Deloitte Consulting Blue font = Deloitte Consulting Advisors Underlined = Third-party vendor Last updated: 9/17/13
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The MCC Education and Knowledge-Transfer Activities Examples, not comprehensive (see website) Two-week Summer Schools on web: lectures, labs, audio Board (D. Ceperley, D.D. Johnson, J. Kim, R.M. Martin, T.J. Martinez, E. de Sturler) chooses topic and organizer is found. 2004 “Computational Nanotechnology” organizer U. Ravioli 2003 “Theoretical and Computational Biology”, organizer K. Schulten 2002 “Simulation of Electron Devices and MEMS”, organizer N. Aluru 2001“Tools for multiple Length and Time Scales”, organizers (board) Other Outreach, Networking, and Workshops “EU/US KKR Electronic-Structure Workshop (February 2004) organizers D.D. Johnson and H. Ebert (Technical U., Münich). “Understanding Complex Systems Symposia” 2001-2004, organizer A. Hubler with K. Dahmen, D.D. Johnson, and others in physics, biology, etc (on-line lectures/voice). “Novel Simulation Methods for Soft Condensed Matter Systems” (CECAM, Lyon, June 2004) organizer E. Luijten. Most/All co-PIs have contributed as lecturers, organizers, etc., for these activities! 17-20 June 2004 Website: http://www.mcc.uiuc.edu Materials Computation Center University of Illinois UrbanaChampaign
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  Student #1 Student #2 Student #3 Student #4 Student #5 Student #6 Student #7 Student #8 Student #9 Student #10 Student #11 Student #12 Student #13 Student #14 Student #15   Student #16   Student #17   Student #18   Student #19   Student #20   Student #21     Techniq ue   Desig n   Presenta tion   TOTA L POIN TS 87   Creativ ity And Conce pt 87 73 100 87% 93 100 100 93 80 87 93 80 87 87 87 100 73 80 87 93 87 87 87 100 100 100 100 100 87 87 87 100 97%   85%   90%   83%   90%   100%   100 100 100 100 87 87 87 87 100 100 100 100 87 93 100 93 80 87 93 93 100 100 100 100 67 87 87 87 100%   82% 80 87 93 80 85% 87 87 93 80 87% 100 100 100 100 100% 67 93 93 87 85% 87 100 100 93 95% 87 100 100 100 97% 90% 100%   87%   100%   93%   88% The results show an overall above average achievement and consistency within each category of scoring. Based on the data, emphasis will continue in areas of technique and design. The high scores in the presentation area are credited to the formal critiques and informal presentations conducted in each design course. The rubric is shared with the students throughout the semester, making each student aware of the assessment areas and criteria. Every required deliverable is compared against the rubric by the student to determine the scoring possibilities. Students are given immediate feedback by all evaluators at the reception. A discussion by students and faculty also takes place in a classroom critique following the reception.
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4. The profiles of other students with similar performance histories are then used to create statistically reliable projected scores for each student . Student Projection1 Student Projection 2 Student Projection 3 The Pool Student Projection 4 Student Projection 5 Student Projection 6 Student Projection 7 The actual results of other students who have profiles very similar to Student One are used to create a statistical projection of where Student One is likely to be at the end of a given academic year. Student Projection 8 Student Projection 9 Student Projection 10 Student Projection 11 Student Projection 12 Student Projection 13 Student Projection 14 Student Projection 15 Student Projection 16 Student Projection 17 Student Projection 18 Student Projection 19 Student Projection 20
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3. Each student’s profile is added to a pool that contains the profiles of all students, present and past, who have taken the same year-end assessments. Student Profile 1 Student Profile 2 Student Profile 3 Student Profile 4 The Pool Student Profile 5 Student Profile 6 Student Profile 7 Student Profile 8 Student Profile 9 Student Profile 10 Student Profile 11 Student Profile 12 Student Profile 13 Student Profile 14 Student Profile 15 Student Data Includes the profiles of all students from this year and from past years who have taken the same year-end assessments Student Profile 16 Student Profile 17 Student Profile 18 Student Profile 19 Student Profile 20 Copyright © 2003. Battelle for Kids
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Solutions Lead Poisoning Prevention Control Phase out leaded gasoline worldwide Replace lead pipes and plumbing fixtures containing lead solder Phase out waste incineration Remove leaded paint and lead dust from older houses and apartments Ban use of lead solder Ban use of lead in computer and TV monitors Ban lead glazing for ceramicware used to serve food Ban candles withlead cores Test blood for lead by age 1 Sharply reduce lead emissions from incinerators Remove lead from TV sets and computer monitors before incineration or land disposal Test for lead in existing ceramicware used to serve food Test existing candles for lead Wash fresh fruits and vegetables Fig. 16-18, p. 419
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MATREX OneSAF Transition Current Task Organization Project Lead Chris Metevier (Govt) 3CE Lead Susan Harkrider Deputy Project Lead Don Logston Programmatic Team Technical Team SE Lead S. Antommarchi Architecture Lead Scott Gallant (TBD) TRADOC (BLCSE) FCS LSI Engin Altan (Lead) Jim Duke Khoi Do (Deputy) Bob Wittman Steve Wurster James Ramsey Eric Kemmler (Additional TBD…) (Additional TBD…) Configuration Mgt Lead Sylvie Platre PM OneSAF Lead Engineer Hy Ly (Govt) Design & Development Lead Gary Smith Integration & Test Lead Karla Pereira Core MATREX OneSAF Transition Team 3CE Partners: ATEC PM OneSAF Chief Engineer Oanh Tran (Govt) Systems Engineers Bonnie Eifert & Donnie Palmer (Govt) Daphne Hurrell OneSAF: • Rodney Angry • Karyn Eusey • Jim Page III • Mike Dayton • Kim Speck AMS: • Jason Rupert ARMS: • Leslie Tasey (Additional TBD…) VDMS: • C. Kaniarz CMS2/CMS/UC • Tim Collins HC-NEBC / C3HPM • C. Dunmire • Tim Lee • Joshua Walters Indiv. Combatant: • Dave Tucker • Von Ly MMIC/Protocore: • Keith Snively CBRN: • Chris Goughan • Mike O’Conner • Derrick Briscoe • Joshua Combs NEC2 / EE / WI: • Lewis Harmon • (TBD) SNE/Weather: • Bonnie Eifert • Ed Sears SimInit: • Charles Budde RDA Domain Rep: • John Thomas MSLS: • Daniel Flagg Systems Engineering: • vice Hiep Tran Survivability: • P. Bounker • Syed Mohammed • Brian Kelly CATCrewstn: • Kevin Hope VV&A: • Charles Derrick • Josh Miller C4ISR OTM TB: • Art Lugo PM OneSAF Team Lead Eric Root Rob Whitman & other OneSAF A&I Team Personnel as Needed
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MUSICAL INSTRUMENT DIGITAL INTERFACE (MIDI) PIANO ORGAN BASS 1 Acoustic Grand 2 Bright Acoustic 3 Electric Grand 17 Drawbar Organ 18 Percussive Organ 19 Rock Organ 4 Honky-Tonk 20 Church Organ 34 Electric Bass (finger) 35 Electric Bass (pick) 36 Fretless Bass 5 Electric Piano 1 6 Electric Piano 2 7 Harpsichord 8 Clavinet 21 Reed Organ CHROMATIC PERCUSSION 9 Celesta 10 Glockenspiel 11 Music Box 12 Vibraphone 13 Marimba 14 Xylophone 15 Tubular Bells 16 Dulcimer PART 5.5 AUDIO PROGRAMMING PAGE 5 ENSEMBLE REED 65 Soprano Sax 37 Slap Bass 1 49 String Ensemble 1 50 String Ensemble 2 51 Synth Strings 1 52 Synth Strings 2 53 Choir Aahs 22 Accordian 38 Slap Bass 2 54 Voice Oohs 70 English Horn 23 Harmonica 24 Tango Accordian 39 Synth Bass 1 40 Synth Bass 2 55 Synth Voice 56 Orchestra Hit 71 Bassoon 72 Clarinet GUITAR 25 Nylon String Guitar 26 Steel String Guitar 27 Electric Jazz Guitar 28 Electric Clean Guitar 29 Electric Muted Guitar 30 Overdriven Guitar 31 Distortion Guitar 32 Guitar Harmonics 33 Acoustic Bass SOLO STRINGS BRASS 66 Alto Sax 67 Tenor Sax 68 Baritone Sax 69 Oboe PIPE 41 Violin 57 Trumpet 73 Piccolo 42 Viola 58 Trombone 74 Flute 43 Cello 59 Tuba 75 Recorder 44 Contrabass 60 Muted Trumpet 61 French Horn 76 Pan Flute 62 Brass Section 78 Skakuhachi 63 Synth Brass 1 79 Whistle 64 Synth Brass 2 80 Ocarina 45 Tremolo Strings 46 Pizzicato Strings 47 Orchestral Strings 48 Timpani 77 Blown Bottle SYNTH LEAD SYNTH EFFECTS 81 Lead 1 97 FX 1 (square) (rain) 82 Lead 2 98 FX 2 (sawtooth) (soundtrack) 83 Lead 3 99 FX 3 (crystal) (calliope) 84 Lead 4 100 FX 4 (atmo(chiff) sphere) 85 Lead 5 101 FX 5 (charang) (brightness) 86 Lead 6 (voice) 102 FX 6 (goblins) 87 Lead 7 (fifths) 103 FX 7 (echoes) 88 Lead 8 104 FX 8 (bass+lead) (sci-fi) SYNTH PAD ETHNIC 89 Pad 1 (new age) 90 Pad 2 (warmth) 91 Pad 3 (polysynth) 92 Pad 4 (choir) 93 Pad 5 (bowed) 105 Sitar 94 Pad 6 (metallic) 95 Pad 7 (halo) 96 Pad 8 (sweep) PERCUSSIVE 113 Tinkle Bell 114 Agogo 115 Steel Drums 116 Woodblock 117 Taiko Drum 118 Melodic Tom 119 Synth Drum 120 Reverse Cymbal SOUND EFFECTS 106 Banjo 121 Guitar Fret Noise 122 Breath Noise 107 Shamisen 123 Seashore 108 Koto 124 Bird Tweet 109 Kalimba 110 Bagpipe 125 Telephone Ring 126 Helicopter 111 Fiddle 127 Applause 112 Shanai 128 Gunshot
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STUDENT AFFAIRS ANNUAL REPORT: GOALS STATED FOR 2014-2015 Goal 1: Increase Student Affairs engagement, outreach, and service • Evaluate current levels of communication with prospective, accepted and enrolled students and their engagement in programming and other campus activities. Apply findings to develop communication plans for all Student Affairs units • Increase Health Center utilization by 20%. • Continue early communication outreach and recruiting efforts to increase overall student-athlete rosters by 20%. • Develop partnerships with at least 3 community organizations to enhance referrals for students, to expand opportunities for participation in on campus programming and to highlight student success • Continue to build social media presence and explore new ways to communicate with students regarding programs and services Goal 2: Enhance Student Affairs programs and services to positively impact student retention, graduation and success. • Design and implement at least 4 small group experiences for students with the Dean of Student Services. • Provide at least 2 opportunities for students to develop leadership skills and build their identities as student leaders. • Create a peer advisory group by December 15, 2014 to aid in educating the student body about the top diagnoses in the Health and Wellness Center and to assist educational health programs offered in collaboration with Campus Housing and Residence Life • Investigate an Alternative Winter Break (AWB) in the DC area with facilitation from the Campus Ministry student intern for service • Institute mandatory study tables during fall, winter and spring seasons to improve overall academic performance of student-athletes to maintain a minimum of a 3.0 overall average • Student Affairs staff will collaborate to present at least 4 educational programs (at least 2 per semester) open and advertised to all students. Goal 3: Enhance Data Collection and Assessment • Conduct an assessment of on campus residents to gather feedback on strengths and areas of improvement in the quality of life for residential students to contribute to changes in programming or services that contribute to an increase in the retention of students living on campus from fall 2014 to spring 2015 by 2.5% and from spring 2015 to fall 2015 by 10%. • Enhance data collection and analysis of student involvement and engagement in Student Activities, Campus Traditions, and Athletics events. • Establish a Student Athlete Advisory Committee (SAAC) – two athletes per team who will all meet twice a semester with Assistant Director to provide direct feedback on initiatives, athlete experience and service projects. 77
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Recognized Student Organization Renewal Process All recognized student organizations (chartered or sponsored) must annually complete mandated renewal registration to remain in good standing with the Center for Student Development. The requirements and process of obtaining and maintaining University Recognition are as follows: • During the annual recognition period, every registered chartered and sponsored student organization will furnish the Center for Student Development with a list of at least three authorized representatives. • During the recognition period, each registered chartered or sponsored student organization must file with the Center for Student Development a statement that the registered student or sponsored organization does not, and will not during the academic year: – – – – • Have as a member any person who is neither a student nor a member of the faculty or staff of the University, Deny membership on any basis prohibited by the University non-discrimination policy or student organization eligibility standards described above or Engage in activities that involve the subjection of a probationary member of the group to dangerous, harmful, or degrading acts as defined in University policies on hazing and/or sexual misconduct If the Center for Student Development determines that the statement is or has become false, disciplinary proceedings may be initiated by the Office of Civility and Community Standards as per the Student Code of Conduct. During the academic year there may be changes in officers, advisors, or constitutions of student organizations. It is the responsibility of each student organization to update their student organization’s information with the Center for Student Development for any and all changes.
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Student-Developed Post-Reading Graphic Organizer  Teacher uses a semi-complete graphic organizer to introduce and teach the strategy to the student in how to construct a self-generated graphic organizer. Determine Content and Type of GO  Pre-requisite skills  Determine Reading Comprehension Obectives 
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Related Resources Torrice, Cecil Michael “How Lead Ended Up In Flint’s Tap Water”, C & E News, Vol 94(7), pp 26-29. Web Date: Feb 11, 2016. http://cen.acs.org/articles/94/i7/Lead-Ended-Flints-Tap-Water.html http://cen.acs.org/articles/94/i7/Lead-Ended-Flints-Tap-Water.html? utm_source=UNM&utm_medium=Partner&utm_campaign=CEN Davenport, Matt “Lead levels remain high in Flint’s water”, C & E News, 94(16), April 15, 2016 http://cen.acs.org/articles/94/i16/Lead-levels-remain-high-Flints.html http://flintwaterstudy.org/ http://www.nbcnews.com/storyline/flint-water-crisis/water-lead-level-falls-below-federal-limit-flint-n711716 Bacterial outbreaks: http://www.cnn.com/2016/10/03/health/flint-water-shigellosis-outbreak/ http://www.forbes.com/sites/judystone/2016/01/14/legionnaires-disease-compounds-flints-lead-poisoning-wa ter-crisis/#f82ea01702df Maynard, J. B. “Overview of Lead Scale Formation and Water Solubility: http://www.sedimentaryores.net/Pipe%20Scales/Lead%20Scale%20Formation%20and%20Solubility%20-% 20overview.pdf http://www.sedimentaryores.net/Pipe%20Scales/Lead%20Solubility.html Flint’s Water Crisis and the ‘Troublemaker Scientist’ 35 https://www.nytimes.com/2016/08/21/magazine/flints-water-crisis-and-the-troublemaker-scientist.html?_r=0
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Expository Learning    Advance organizer – broad introductory statement of the information that will be presented in a lesson Comparative organizer – broad statement that reminds the student of what he or she already knows Expository organizer – broad statement of what is to be learned in a lesson
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PAI786, Class 15: Concentrated Poverty •Lead-Paint Poisoning, 2 ▫ The distressing concentration of lead in the water in Flint, Michigan has received a lot of attention—as it should. ▫ But lead paint is a more important problem nationwide and deserves much more attention. ▫ Cleveland, which is 150 miles from Flint, has dangerous lead levels in 14 percent of its children, twice the highest rate recorded in Flint. Government efforts to limit lead paint have stalled, despite the continued presence of lead paint in many old buildings. ▫ See: http://www.nytimes.com/2016/03/04/us/lead-paint-contamination-persists-in-many-cit ies-as-cleanup-falters.html?_ r=0 and http://www.nytimes.com/2016/03/05/opinion/blame-hud-for-americas-lead-epidemic .html?ref=opinion&_ r=0
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Guidebooks in the Content Enhancement Series  Routines for planning and leading learning  Course Organizer Routine  Unit Organizer Routine  Lesson Organizer Routine University of Kansas Center for Research on Learning 2002 4
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DEN 219/229 Reflection Journal Rubric GRADING Criteria Reflective Student Aware Student Reflective Novice BelowExpectations Clarity Language is clear and expressive. The reader can create a mental picture of the situation being described. Abstract concepts are explained accurately. Explanation makes sense to an uninformed reader. The learning experience being reflected upon is relevant and meaningful to student and course learning goals. Minor, infrequent lapses in clarity and accuracy. There are frequent lapses in clarity and accuracy. Language is unclear and confusing throughout. Concepts are either not discussed or are presented inaccurately. The learning experience being reflected upon is relevant and meaningful to student and course learning goals. Student makes attempts to demonstrate relevance, but the relevance is unclear to the reader. Most of the reflection is irrelevant to student and/ or course learning goals. The reflection demonstrates connections between the experience and material from other courses, but lacks relevance and depth. There is little to no attempt to demonstrate connections between the learning experience and previous other personal and/ or learning experiences. Student makes attempts at applying the learning experience to understanding of self, others, and/ or course concepts but fails to demonstrate depth of analysis. There is some attempt at self-criticism, but the selfreflection fails to demonstrate a new awareness of personal biases, etc. No attempt to demonstrate connections to previous learning or experience. Student’s language is clear and expressive Relevance The learning experience is relevant and meaningful to student. Interconnections The reflection demonstrates connections between the experience and material from The reflection demonstrates other courses; past connections between the experience and material from experience; and/ or personal goals. other courses. Analysis The reflection moves beyond simple description of the experience Self-criticism Ability of the student to question their own biases, stereotypes, preconceptions, and/ or assumptions. The reflection moves beyond simple description of the experience to an analysis of how the experience contributed to student understanding of self, others, and/ or course concepts. The reflection demonstrates student attempts to analyze the experience but analysis lacks depth. The reflection demonstrates ability of the student to question their own biases, stereotypes, preconceptions, and/ or assumptions and define new modes of thinking as a result. The reflection demonstrates ability of the student to question their own biases, stereotypes, preconceptions. Adapted from University of Iowa, Office of Service Learning Reflection does not move beyond description of the learning experience(s). No attempt at selfcriticism.
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Running Example Course Registration: Current Logical Level 0 Diagram Class Request Student Payment Receipt 1.0 Register Student for Course 2.0 D1 Student Class Records Collect Student Fee Student and Student Course Data Class Record Payment Student Class Record 3.0 Produce Student Schedule Student Schedule Student Student Class Record 4.0 Produce Class Roster Class Roster Professor Payment Information D2 Student Payments Student Class Record 5.0 Produce Enrollment Report Enrollment Report Registrar
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