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BEC /FM Database Building Al McGuire Center Al McGuire Center Al McGuire Center Al McGuire Center Al McGuire Center Al McGuire Center Al McGuire Center Al McGuire Center Al McGuire Center Al McGuire Center Floor LL LL 1 1 2A 2A 2B 2B Gym Department Type of contact Last Name, First Name Athletics Athletics Athletics Athletics Athletics Athletics Athletics Athletics Athletics Athletics BEC Fire Marshal 1 Fire Marshal 2 Fire Marshal 1 Fire Marshal 2 Fire Marshal 1 Fire Marshal 2 Fire Marshal 1 Fire Marshal 2 Fire Marshal 1 Baker, Aaron Ernesrt, Eugene Smith, Todd Kellahar, Barbara 414-288-5931 414-288-0328 414-288-5785 414-288-7130 Baker, Aaron Bobert, Sarah Ford, Tom Lewis, Maureen Claus, Sarah 414-288-5931 414-288-5253 414-288-5961 414-288-0330 414-288-4785 BEC Fire marshal 2 Fire marshal 1 BEC Fire Marshal 1 Fire Marshal 1 Fire Marshal 1 Fire Marshal 1 Fire Marshal 1 Fire Marshal 1 Fire Marshal 1 Fire Marshal 1 Fire Marshal 2 Fire Marshal 1 Fire Marshal 2 Fire Marshal 1 Fire Marshal 1 Fire Marshal 2 Fire Marshal 1 Fire Marshal 1 Fire Marshal 2 Fire Marshal 1 Wucherer, Neal (days) Brittany Henne Fisher, Bradley Abler, Dan (nights) Mikolajewski, Julie Glazewski, Fran Porterfield, Chris Mullens, Rob Yearian, Scott Glazewski, Fran Niemi, Susan Lee, Linda Vicker, Todd Kuligowski, Julie Marx, Jillian DeBerry, Rodney Beckley, Jennifer Mesdijn, Arshig Pendzich, Sue McDonald, Kelley Kading, Melissa Kuras, Stacy 414-288-5656 414-288-8255 414-288-8255 414-288-5528 414-288-3047 414-288-7709 414-288-7613 414-288-3274 414-233-2034 414-288-7709 414-288-3685 414-288-0628 BEC Fire Marshal 1 Fire Marshal 2 Fire Marshal 1 Fire Marshal 2 Kaboskey, Amy Anderson, Renee Owens, Tracy Bass, Jerri Lampiris, Kari Alumni Memorial Union Alumni Memorial Union Alumni Memorial Union Alumni Memorial Union Alumni Memorial Union Alumni Memorial Union Alumni Memorial Union Alumni Memorial Union Alumni Memorial Union Alumni Memorial Union Alumni Memorial Union Alumni Memorial Union Alumni Memorial Union Alumni Memorial Union Alumni Memorial Union Alumni Memorial Union Alumni Memorial Union Alumni Memorial Union Alumni Memorial Union Alumni Memorial Union Alumni Memorial Union Alumni Memorial Union 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 4 4 4 Brew Bayou Brew Bayou Brew Bayou Spirit Shop Spirit Shop Student Development Marketing Office, 151 Union Station, 158 US Bank MUSG University Ministry Rm 236 AMU Administration Rm 213 AMU Administration Rm 213 Event Management Rm 245 Event Management Rm 245 Marquette Place Catering Catering Student Development, 329 Special Events, Rm 450 Special Events, Rm 450 Student Affairs Child Care Center Child Care Center Child Care Center Child Care Center Child Care Center 1 1 1 2 2 Child Care Child Care Child Care Child Care Child Care 2018 MU Building Emergency Coordinator Training Office Phone 414-288-3080 414-288-5554 4414-288-6370 414-288-0469 414-288-3074 414-288-3074 414-288-3106 414-288-0634 414-288-7431 414-288-7525 414-288-2806 414-288-5806 414-288-2233 414-288-2235 414-288-2236 Cell Phone
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City Housing Trust Funds Berkeley, California: Housing Trust Fund Cupertino, California: Affordable Housing Fund Los Angeles, California: Housing Trust Fund Menlo Park, California: Below Market Rate Housing Reserve Morgan Hill, California: Senior Housing Trust Fund Palo Alto, California: The Housing Reserve Sacramento, California: Housing Trust Fund San Diego, California: Housing Trust Fund San Francisco, California: Office Affordable Housing Production Program; Hotel Tax Fund; and Bond Housing Program Santa Monica, California: Citywide Housing Trust Fund West Hollywood, California: Affordable Housing Trust Fund Aspen, Colorado: Housing Day Care Fund Boulder, Colorado: Community Housing Assistance Program and Affordable Housing Fund Denver, Colorado: Skyline Housing Fund Longmont, Colorado: Affordable Housing Fund Telluride, Colorado: Housing Trust Fund Tallahassee, Florida: Housing Trust Fund Chicago, Illinois: Low Income Housing Trust Fund Bloomington, Indiana: Housing Trust Fund Fort Wayne, Indiana: Central City Housing Trust Fund Indianapolis, Indiana: Housing Trust Fund Lawrence, Kansas: Housing Trust Fund Boston, Massachusetts: Neighborhood Housing Trust Cambridge, Massachusetts: Housing Trust Fund Ann Arbor, Michigan: Housing Trust Fund St. Paul, Minnesota: STAR Program St. Louis, Missouri: Housing Trust Fund New Jersey: 142 COAH approved developer fee programs Santa Fe, New Mexico: Community Housing Trust Greensboro, North Carolina: VM Nussbaum Housing Partnership Fund Columbus/Franklin County: Affordable Housing Trust Fund Toledo, Ohio: Housing Fund Portland, Oregon: Housing Investment Fund Charleston, South Carolina: Housing Trust Fund Knoxville, Tennessee: Housing Trust Fund Nashville, Tennessee: Nashville Housing Fund, Inc. Austin, Texas: Housing Trust Fund San Antonio, Texas: Housing Trust Salt Lake City, Utah: Housing Trust Fund Burlington, Vermont: Housing Trust Fund Alexandria, Virginia: Housing Trust Fund Manassas, Virginia: Manassas Housing Trust Fund, Inc. Bainbridge Island, Washington: Housing Trust Fund Seattle, Washington: Housing Assistance Funds Washington, D.C.: Housing Production Trust Fund
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Entrepreneurship: is it good enough to be social? John F. McVea and Michael J. Naughton Introduction • The term Social Entrepreneurship has experienced a huge growth in influence over that last decade. The literature proposes a number of advantages to social entrepreneurship as a frame of reference: • Promoting innovation within non-profits • Leveraging and focusing scarce philanthropic resources • Faster response to strategic challenges • Infusion of business skills to non-business world • Involvement of non government assets in social problems • Creation of hybrid (blurred) organizations between for profit and non profit worlds. It is widely observed that practice has outpaced theoretical development leading to little agreement on definitions or frameworks for social entrepreneurship. We believe that widespread and unchallenged acceptance of the term Social Entrepreneurship masks some dangers and has contributed to confusion in the field. We believe that if we apply some insights from Catholic Social Teaching to the issue of social entrepreneurship we can move beyond the false dichotomy of Entrepreneurship/ Social Entrepreneurship and identify three specific entrepreneurial strategies which support a more robust discussion of the nature of the work that is entrepreneurship. We believe that the field would benefit from spending less time discussing social entrepreneurship and more time discussion the nature of the good entrepreneur. • • • • • The dangers of naïve acceptance of Social Entrepreneurship • • • The rhetorical risk: • Narrow definition: if S.E. is simply used to rebrand non-profits then much of the value of the new activities, hybrid design, stimulation of new resources and innovation is lost. • Implied dichotomy: if “good” ventures are termed “social” it can imply that other forms of entrepreneurship are “asocial” or “anti social” • Boundarylessness: In contrast, if all business activities are deemed “social”, to some degree or other, then the term loses all meaning focus on the distinctive phenomenon that is S.E. Despite these risks we are more concerned with a risk beyond rhetoric; the risk of undermining the meaning of work, particularly from the perspective of Catholic Social Teaching. While this perspective is drawn from the Catholic tradition, accepting the content of CST does not require acceptance of Catholic faith (Guitan, 2009). The three goods of social entrepreneurship • We are concerned by the side-effects of a concentration thesis that suggests that the moral responsibilities of entrepreneurship can be concentrated in a subset of businesses called social enterprises, presumably leaving other enterprise to simply concentrate on serving themselves. • We are concerned by the impact such a concentration thesis could have on the conception of the meaning of work beyond the world of social enterprise. • We are concerned with how such an approach can focus attention solely on the altruistic contributions of entrepreneurial ventures as the sole measure of their contribution to the Common Good • Instead we propose that, rather than trying to determine the difference between entrepreneurship and social entrepreneurship, it would be more productive to focus on the questions “What is Good Entrepreneurship? What action and activities define that goodness?” • We further propose that, by apply the perspective of Catholic Social Teaching, we can identify three specific strategies through which entrepreneurial ventures may contribute to the Common Good thus suggesting that good entrepreneurship requires a focus on: 1. Good Goods. The primary way an entrepreneurial venture can contribute to the Common Good is by bringing into existence new products and services which are inherently good and which enrich lives and minimize any unintended harms. This can include what we call the “entrepreneurship of the mundane”, that is, the manufacture of the nuts and bolts and basic necessities of life as well as the creation of life saving treatments. However, inclusion of good goods as a primary moral contribution of entrepreneurship must also require of the entrepreneur analysis of what goods are not good, and what aspects of even good goods should be redesigned or rethought in order to minimize unintended consequences. We find, in our discussions, that this is a much under appreciated dimension of the good of entrepreneurship. 2. Good Work. The second way an entrepreneurial venture can contribute to the Common Good is through the nature of the work that is carried out by the venture. This dimension has several aspects both internal and external to the entrepreneur: • The development of good character in the entrepreneur. This aspect of the good is derived from the subjective dimension of work, that is, just as how-we-work ends up changing the world, so working-on-the-world changes us. Most professionals spend the majority of their waking hours at work. As habits, character and wisdom are developed through experience and activity, for the entrepreneur, doing good work is an important opportunity to develop character. Society as a whole is better off for having good, successful entrepreneurial leaders who, through that calling, can become leaders of character. This dimension of the entrepreneurial good is widely unappreciated even by entrepreneurs themselves • Good relations with employees, customers and other stakeholders. Value creation and trade creates opportunities for the building of social relationships. The central question is “Are you in good relation with those with whom you create value?’ Do your employees have opportunity to develop as people? 3. Good Wealth. The third way the good entrepreneur can contribute to the Common Good is through the creation of good wealth. Good wealth requires a balance of reward for labor/ creativity with the provision of a living wage to all. Good wealth is often captured by individual action but has social strings attached. From the CST perspective the creation of good wealth implies a particular solidarity with the poor. One way to contribute to the common good is to donate altruistically to those in need. But even here, altruism is only one of a number of possible strategies. Good entrepreneurs may also contribute by donating their time or their particular skills. Indeed, since the donation of time and work often requires physical interaction with those in need, it often generates a solidarity of far greater integrity. Finally, it must be emphasized that altruism, for the entrepreneur, is always dependent, indeed subsequent to the creation of good wealth in the first place. Literature cited Alvord, Sarah, David L. Brown, and Christine W. Letts, 2004. “Social Entrepreneurship and Societal Transformation: An Exploratory Study,” The Journal of Applied Behavioral Science. 40:260. Benedict XVI, Caritas et veritate,   Boschee, Jerr. 1998 “What does it take to be a social entrepreneur?” National Centre for Social Entrepreneurs (www.socialentrepreneurs.org/whatdoes/html), 5pp.   Cannon, Carl. 2000. “Charity for profit: how the new social entrepreneurs are creating good by sharing wealth” National Journal, June 16: 1898-1904.   Christie, Michael and Benson Honig. 2006. “Social entrepreneurship: New research findings.” Journal of World Business. 41: 1-5.   Dees, Gregory, J., 1998. “The Meaning of ‘Social Entrepreneurship,’” Original Draft: 10/3.   Drucker, P.F. 1985. Innovation and Entrepreneurship. New York: Harper & Row.   Fowler, Alan. “NGDOs as a moment in history: beyond aid to social entrepreneurship or civic innovation?” Third World Quarterly, 21(4): 637-654.   Gregg, S. and G. Preece: 1999, Christianity and Entrepreneurship (The Centre for Independent Studies Limited, St. Leonards, NSW, Australia).   Hibbert, Sally A., Gillian Hogg and Theresa Quinn. “Consumer response to social entrepreneurship: The case of the Big Issue in Scotland.” International Journal of Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Marketing. 7(3): 288-301.   Johnson, Sherrill, 2000. “Literature Review on Social Entrepreneurship,” Canadian Center for social Entrepreneurship. (http://www.bus.ualberta.ca/ccse/Publications/).   John Paul II, Pope.: 1992 Laborem Exercens (On Human Work): 1981, in D. J. O’Brien and T. A. Shannon, (eds.), Catholic Social Thought (Orbis Books, Maryknoll, NY).   John Paul II, Pope.: 1992 Sollicitudo Rei Socialis (On Social Concern): 1987 in D. J. O’Brien and T. A. Shannon, (eds.), Catholic Social Thought (Orbis Books, Maryknoll, NY).   Kennedy, R., G, Atkinson, and M. Naughton, (eds.): 1994, Dignity of Work: John Paul II Speaks To Managers and Workers (University Press of America, Lanham, Maryland).   Mair, Johanna and Ernesto Noboa, 2003. “Social Entrepreneurship: How Intentions to Create a Social Enterprise get Formed,” IESE Business School.   Mair, Johanna and Ignasi Marti, 2006. “Social entrepreneurship research: A source of explanation, prediction, and delight,” Journal of World Business. 41: 36-44.   Melé, D.:2001, ‘A Challenge for Business Enterprises: Introducing the Primacy of the Subjective Meaning of Work in Work Organization’, (http://www.stthomas.edu/cathstudies/cst/mgmt/le/papers/mele.htm) Conclusions We have argued that, while there is great promise in the contemporary social entrepreneurship movement, there are also a number of important dangers. We propose that, if we confront rather than acquiesce to these dangers, we can use the perspective of Catholic Social Teaching to broaden the scope of entrepreneurial ventures that we study, to enrich the moral dimension of entrepreneurial strategy and to deepen the teaching of entrepreneurship as a whole. We recommend the following to move toward these contributions: • Incorporate social entrepreneurship into entrepreneurship in a way that enhances the three goods of entrepreneurship. Specifically we propose replacing the questions “What is social entrepreneurship?” with the questions “What does it mean to be a Good entrepreneur?” From this perspective we can then apply what we have called the three goods of entrepreneurship as a means of supplying critical challenge and inspiration to all forms of entrepreneurship such that the true moral dimension of this critical force in our lives comes into fruition. • Encourage research within the entrepreneurship discipline that addresses traditional social entrepreneurial issues such as micro lending, fair trade products, etc. • Develop bridge courses such as Theo/Cath 306 which help students understand and experience the meaning of the good entrepreneur as well as connect students to the spiritual and moral principles of a good entrepreneur. • Expose entrepreneurship students to so-called social entrepreneurs as well so-called conventional good entrepreneurs so they can see the spectrum of entrepreneurial activities. © File copyright Colin Purrington. You may use for making your poster, of course, but please do not plagiarize, adapt, or put on your own site. Also, do not upload this file, even if modified, to third-party file-sharing sites such as doctoc.com. If you have insatiable need to post a template onto your own site, search the internet for a different template to steal. File downloaded from http://colinpurrington.com/tips/ academic/posterdesign. Acknowledgments I am indebted to Michael Naughton and Laura Dunham for their reflections and thoughts on this paper.
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STUDENT AFFAIRS ANNUAL REPORT: GOALS STATED FOR 2014-2015 Goal 1: Increase Student Affairs engagement, outreach, and service • Evaluate current levels of communication with prospective, accepted and enrolled students and their engagement in programming and other campus activities. Apply findings to develop communication plans for all Student Affairs units • Increase Health Center utilization by 20%. • Continue early communication outreach and recruiting efforts to increase overall student-athlete rosters by 20%. • Develop partnerships with at least 3 community organizations to enhance referrals for students, to expand opportunities for participation in on campus programming and to highlight student success • Continue to build social media presence and explore new ways to communicate with students regarding programs and services Goal 2: Enhance Student Affairs programs and services to positively impact student retention, graduation and success. • Design and implement at least 4 small group experiences for students with the Dean of Student Services. • Provide at least 2 opportunities for students to develop leadership skills and build their identities as student leaders. • Create a peer advisory group by December 15, 2014 to aid in educating the student body about the top diagnoses in the Health and Wellness Center and to assist educational health programs offered in collaboration with Campus Housing and Residence Life • Investigate an Alternative Winter Break (AWB) in the DC area with facilitation from the Campus Ministry student intern for service • Institute mandatory study tables during fall, winter and spring seasons to improve overall academic performance of student-athletes to maintain a minimum of a 3.0 overall average • Student Affairs staff will collaborate to present at least 4 educational programs (at least 2 per semester) open and advertised to all students. Goal 3: Enhance Data Collection and Assessment • Conduct an assessment of on campus residents to gather feedback on strengths and areas of improvement in the quality of life for residential students to contribute to changes in programming or services that contribute to an increase in the retention of students living on campus from fall 2014 to spring 2015 by 2.5% and from spring 2015 to fall 2015 by 10%. • Enhance data collection and analysis of student involvement and engagement in Student Activities, Campus Traditions, and Athletics events. • Establish a Student Athlete Advisory Committee (SAAC) – two athletes per team who will all meet twice a semester with Assistant Director to provide direct feedback on initiatives, athlete experience and service projects. 77
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SA Strategic Plan Reporting example – Residence Life, Housing, and Dining Services • Residence Life, Housing and Dining Services completed a renovation project for Sunvilla Tower which included new furniture and appliances. (3.2) • RAs in Residence Life, Housing and Dining Services met with residents four times during the year to ask questions designed to ascertain whether connections were being made to the University and whether students were being successful in the classroom. (3.2) • Staff members from Residence Life and the Dean of Students Office worked with staff members in the Division of Student Development and Public Affairs to address the needs of students who indicated during SOAR that they were uncertain if they expected graduate from MSU. (1.4) • Residence Life, Housing and Dining Services implemented a new experience model (programming model) to assist RAs in planning needs-based activities and better utilize University events. (2.1) • Residence Life, Housing and Dining Services utilized regional and national recruitment events to fill positions with staff members from underrepresented populations. Resulted in filling eight positions in custodial, support staff, professional, and graduate levels. (4.3) • Residence Life, Housing and Dining Services began the renovation project for the Blair bathrooms. (3.2) • Residence Life, Housing and Dining Services determined Woods House to be a top priority for a renovation project along with an examination of plans for a new building. (3.2) • Residence Life, Housing and Dining Services collaborated with the Division of Marketing and Publications staff to begin a strategic branding campaign for all publications and web presence. (3.1) • Residence Life, Housing and Dining Services staff members implemented the new LLC reorganization model and planned for the addition of three new LLC options. (2.1) 3
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