IUC’s scope will focus on two functions (Finance and IT) Adherence to process definitions within the Hackett taxonomy is key to comparability; processes are defined end to end Selling and General Administrative Scope Finance Finance Human Human Resources Resources Sales* Sales* Executive Executive and and Corporate Corporate Services Services**  Total  Sales  General Cash Cash Disbursements Disbursements Total Rewards Rewards Administration Administration Sales Execution Execution General Administration Administration Management Management    Revenue Cycle Payroll Services Sales Operations   Travel and  Revenue Cycle Payroll Services Sales Operations Travel and Transportation Transportation Services Services  Planning  Real Accounting Accounting and and External External Reporting Reporting  Data Data Mgmt., Mgmt., Reporting Reporting & & Compliance Compliance Planning and and Strategy Strategy Real Estate Estate & & Facilities Facilities Management Management  Staffing  Function  Government Tax Tax Management Management Staffing Services Services Function Management Management Government Affairs Affairs  Labor  Legal Treasury Treasury Management Management Labor Relations Relations Legal  Workforce  Quality Compliance Compliance Management Management Workforce Development Development Services Services Service* Quality Management Management Service*  Organisational  Planning Risk  Order  Planning & & Performance Performance Management Management Organisational Effectiveness Effectiveness Risk and and Security Security Management Management Order and and Contract Contract Management Management (OTC) (OTC)  Total  Corporate Fiscal Communications  Service Fiscal Analysis Analysis Total Rewards Rewards Planning Planning Execution Corporate Communications Service Execution  Strategic  Planning Function  Service Function Management Management Strategic Workforce Workforce Planning Planning Planning and and Strategy Strategy Service Operations Operations  Function  Executive Office  Planning Function Management Management and Strategy Executive Office Planning and Strategy  Function Function Management Management Information Technology          Information Technology            Infrastructure Infrastructure Management Management End End User User Support Support Infrastructure Infrastructure Development Development Application Application Maintenance Maintenance Application Application Development Development & & Implement. Implement. Quality Quality Assurance Assurance Risk Risk Management Management IT IT Business Business Planning Planning Enterprise Enterprise Architecture Architecture Planning Planning Emerging Emerging Technologies Technologies Function Function Management Management Procurement Procurement            Supply Supply Data Data Management Management Requisition Requisition and and PO PO Processing Processing Supplier Scheduling Supplier Scheduling Receipt Receipt Processing Processing Compliance Compliance Management Management Customer Customer Management Management Sourcing Sourcing Execution Execution Supplier Supplier Management Management and and Development Development Sourcing Sourcing & & Supply Supply Base Base Strategy Strategy Function Function Strategy Strategy and and Performance Performance Management Management Function Function Management Management Marketing* Marketing*      Marketing Marketing Communication Communication Brand Brand and and Product Product Management Management Planning and Planning and Strategy Strategy Market Market Research Research and and Analytics Analytics Function Management Function Management Capture FTEs and Costs as defined regardless of where they are organizationally located
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RAID Volumes (4 of 4) • When you decide upon using RAID 1 or RAID 5, consider the following: • The boot and system files can be placed on RAID level 1, but not on RAID level 5 • RAID level 1 uses two hard disks and RAID level 5 uses from 3 to 32 • RAID level 1 is more expensive to implement than RAID level 5 • RAID level 5 requires more memory than RAID level 1 • Depending on the disk controller, in Windows Server 2016 disk read access is faster in RAID level 1 and RAID level 5 than is write access © 2018 Cengage. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part, except for use as permitted in a license distributed with a certain product or service or otherwise on a password-protected website for classroom use. 25
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RAID (Cont)  Several improvements in disk-use techniques involve the use of multiple disks working cooperatively  Disk striping uses a group of disks as one storage unit  RAID schemes improve performance and improve the reliability of the storage system by storing redundant data  Mirroring or shadowing (RAID 1) keeps duplicate of each disk  Striped mirrors (RAID 1+0) or mirrored stripes (RAID 0+1) provides high performance and high reliability  Block interleaved parity (RAID 4, 5, 6) uses much less redundancy  RAID within a storage array can still fail if the array fails, so automatic replication of the data between arrays is common Operating System Concepts with Java – 8th Edition 12.21 Silberschatz, Galvin and Gagne ©2009
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RAID (Cont.)  Disk striping uses a group of disks as one storage unit  RAID is arranged into six different levels  RAID schemes improve performance and improve the reliability of the storage system by storing redundant data  Mirroring or shadowing (RAID 1) keeps duplicate of each disk  Striped mirrors (RAID 1+0) or mirrored stripes (RAID 0+1) provides high performance and high reliability  Block interleaved parity (RAID 4, 5, 6) uses much less redundancy  RAID within a storage array can still fail if the array fails, so automatic replication of the data between arrays is common  Frequently, a small number of hot-spare disks are left unallocated, automatically replacing a failed disk and having data rebuilt onto them Operating System Concepts Essentials – 2nd Edition 9.35 Silberschatz, Galvin and Gagne ©2013
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RAID (Cont.)  Several improvements in disk-use techniques involve the use of multiple disks working cooperatively  Disk striping uses a group of disks as one storage unit  RAID schemes improve performance and improve the reliability of the storage system by storing redundant data  Mirroring or shadowing (RAID 1) keeps duplicate of each disk  Striped mirrors (RAID 1+0) or mirrored stripes (RAID 0+1) provides high performance and high reliability  Block interleaved parity (RAID 4, 5, 6) uses much less redundancy  RAID within a storage array can still fail if the array fails, so automatic replication of the data between arrays is common  Frequently, a small number of hot-spare disks are left unallocated, automatically replacing a failed disk and having data rebuilt onto them Operating System Concepts Essentials – 8 th Edition 11.33 Silberschatz, Galvin and Gagne ©2011
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Chapter 12: Mass-Storage Systems  Overview of Mass Storage Structure  Disk Structure  Disk Attachment  Disk Scheduling  Disk Management  RAID Structure Operating System Concepts with Java – 8th Edition 12.2 Silberschatz, Galvin and Gagne ©2009
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C:\UMBC\331\java> java.ext.dirs=C:\JDK1.2\JRE\lib\ext java.io.tmpdir=C:\WINDOWS\TEMP\ os.name=Windows 95 java.vendor=Sun Microsystems Inc. java.awt.printerjob=sun.awt.windows.WPrinterJob java.library.path=C:\JDK1.2\BIN;.;C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM;C:\... java.vm.specification.vendor=Sun Microsystems Inc. sun.io.unicode.encoding=UnicodeLittle file.encoding=Cp1252 java.specification.vendor=Sun Microsystems Inc. user.language=en user.name=nicholas java.vendor.url.bug=http://java.sun.com/cgi-bin/bugreport... java.vm.name=Classic VM java.class.version=46.0 java.vm.specification.name=Java Virtual Machine Specification sun.boot.library.path=C:\JDK1.2\JRE\bin os.version=4.10 java.vm.version=1.2 java.vm.info=build JDK-1.2-V, native threads, symcjit java.compiler=symcjit path.separator=; file.separator=\ user.dir=C:\UMBC\331\java sun.boot.class.path=C:\JDK1.2\JRE\lib\rt.jar;C:\JDK1.2\JR... user.name=nicholas user.home=C:\WINDOWS C:\UMBC\331\java>java envSnoop -- listing properties -java.specification.name=Java Platform API Specification awt.toolkit=sun.awt.windows.WToolkit java.version=1.2 java.awt.graphicsenv=sun.awt.Win32GraphicsEnvironment user.timezone=America/New_York java.specification.version=1.2 java.vm.vendor=Sun Microsystems Inc. user.home=C:\WINDOWS java.vm.specification.version=1.0 os.arch=x86 java.awt.fonts= java.vendor.url=http://java.sun.com/ user.region=US file.encoding.pkg=sun.io java.home=C:\JDK1.2\JRE java.class.path=C:\Program Files\PhotoDeluxe 2.0\Adob... line.separator=
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Chapter 11: Mass-Storage Systems  Overview of Mass Storage Structure  Disk Structure  Disk Attachment  Disk Scheduling  Disk Management  Swap-Space Management  RAID Structure  Stable-Storage Implementation  Tertiary Storage Devices Operating System Concepts Essentials – 8 th Edition 11.2 Silberschatz, Galvin and Gagne ©2011
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Storage Fusion Architecture (SFA) 8 x IB QDR or 16 x FC8 Host Ports Interface Virtualization Interface processor Interface processor Interface Virtualization Interface processor Interface processor Interface processor System memory Interface processor Interface processor Interface processor System memory RAID Processors High-Speed Cache Cache Cache Link Link RAID Processors High-Speed Cache Internal SAS Switching Internal SAS Switching 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 1mm ©2012 DataDirect Networks. All Rights Reserved. 5 P RAID RAID 5,6 5,6 6 Q RAID RAID 6 6 7 8 P RAID RAID 5,6 5,6 Q RAID RAID 6 6 Up to 1,200 disks in an SFA 10K Or 1,680 disks in an SFA 12K ddn.com
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Chapter 9: Mass-Storage Systems  Overview of Mass Storage Structure  Disk Structure  Disk Attachment  Disk Scheduling  Disk Management  Swap-Space Management  RAID Structure  Stable-Storage Implementation Operating System Concepts Essentials – 2nd Edition 9.2 Silberschatz, Galvin and Gagne ©2013
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RAID (Redundant Array of Independent Disks) Technology • There are a number of different disk configurations called RAID levels. – – – – – – – – 11/4/2012 RAID 0 Nonredundant RAID 1 Mirrored RAID 0+1 Nonredundant and Mirrored RAID 2 Memory-Style Error-Correcting Codes RAID 3 Bit-Interleaved Parity RAID 4 Block-Interleaved Parity RAID 5 Block-Interleaved Distributed Parity RAID 6 P+Q Redundancy ISC239 Isabelle Bichindaritz 25
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RAID Volumes (1 of 4) • RAID is a set of standards for lengthening disk life, preventing data loss, and enabling relatively uninterrupted access to data • Windows Server 2016 supports RAID levels 0, 1, and 5 • RAID level 0 • Striping with no other redundancy features (such as no parity or mirroring) • RAID level 0 is not recommended in many situations because it does not really provide fault tolerance • RAID level 1 • Disk duplexing is the same as disk mirroring, with the exception that it places the backup disk on a different controller or adapter than is used by the main disk • RAID level 5 • Combines the best features of RAID, including striping, error correction, and checksum verification © 2018 Cengage. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part, except for use as permitted in a license distributed with a certain product or service or otherwise on a password-protected website for classroom use. 22
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Chapter 8 – Processor Scheduling Outline 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 8.6 8.7 8.7.1 8.7.2 8.7.3 8.7.4 8.7.5 8.7.6 8.7.7 8.8 8.9 8.10 Introduction Scheduling Levels Preemptive vs. Nonpreemptive Scheduling Priorities Scheduling Objectives Scheduling Criteria Scheduling Algorithms First-In-First-Out (FIFO) Scheduling Round-Robin (RR) Scheduling Shortest-Process-First (SPF) Scheduling Highest-Response-Ratio-Next (HRRN) Scheduling Shortest-Remaining-Time (SRT) Scheduling Multilevel Feedback Queues Fair Share Scheduling Deadline Scheduling Real-Time Scheduling Java Thread Scheduling  2004 Deitel & Associates, Inc. All rights reserved.
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Use of RAID Technology (contd.)  Different raid organizations are being used under different situations  Raid level 1 (mirrored disks) is the easiest for rebuild of a disk from other disks   Raid level 2 uses memory-style redundancy by using Hamming codes, which contain parity bits for distinct overlapping subsets of components.    Level 2 includes both error detection and correction. Raid level 3 (single parity disks relying on the disk controller to figure out which disk has failed) and level 5 (block-level data striping) are preferred for Large volume storage, with level 3 giving higher transfer rates. Most popular uses of the RAID technology currently are:   It is used for critical applications like logs Level 0 (with striping), Level 1 (with mirroring) and Level 5 with an extra drive for parity. Design Decisions for RAID include:  Level of RAID, number of disks, choice of parity schemes, and grouping of disks for block-level striping. Copyright © 2007 Ramez Elmasri and Shamkant B. Navathe Slide 13- 30
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RAID Technology (contd.)  Different raid organizations were defined based on different combinations of the two factors of granularity of data interleaving (striping) and pattern used to compute redundant information.  Raid level 0 has no redundant data and hence has the best write performance at the risk of data loss  Raid level 1 uses mirrored disks.  Raid level 2 uses memory-style redundancy by using Hamming codes, which contain parity bits for distinct overlapping subsets of components. Level 2 includes both error detection and correction.  Raid level 3 uses a single parity disk relying on the disk controller to figure out which disk has failed.  Raid Levels 4 and 5 use block-level data striping, with level 5 distributing data and parity information across all disks.  Raid level 6 applies the so-called P + Q redundancy scheme using Reed-Soloman codes to protect against up to two disk failures by using just two redundant disks. Copyright © 2007 Ramez Elmasri and Shamkant B. Navathe Slide 13- 29
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Chapter 1: Introduction  What Operating Systems Do  Computer-System Organization  Computer-System Architecture  Operating-System Structure  Operating-System Operations  Process Management  Memory Management  Storage Management  Protection and Security  Distributed Systems  Special-Purpose Systems  Computing Environments  Open-Source Operating Systems Operating System Concepts with Java – 8th Edition 1.2 Silberschatz, Galvin and Gagne ©2009
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Chapter 2: Operating-System Structures  Operating System Services  User Operating System Interface  System Calls  Types of System Calls  System Programs  Operating System Design and Implementation  Operating System Structure  Virtual Machines  Operating System Debugging  Operating System Generation  System Boot Operating System Concepts – 8th Edition 2.2 Silberschatz, Galvin and Gagne ©2009
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Chapter 2: Operating-System Structures  Operating System Services  User Operating System Interface  System Calls  Types of System Calls  System Programs  Operating System Design and Implementation  Operating System Structure  Virtual Machines  Operating System Debugging  Operating System Generation  System Boot Operating System Concepts – 8th Edition 2.2 Silberschatz, Galvin and Gagne ©2009
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Types of RAID • RAID 1: Mirroring – Duplicates data on one drive to another drive and is used for fault tolerance (mirrored volume) • RAID 5: uses three or more drives – Stripes data across drives and uses parity checking – Data is not duplicated • RAID 10: RAID 1+0 (pronounced RAID one zero) – Combination of RAID 1 and RAID 0 – Takes at least 4 disks A+ Guide to Managing & Maintaining Your PC, 8th Edition © Cengage Learning 2014 44
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Time Barbie Tootle Hayes Cape Cartoon Room I Cartoon Room II Suzanne M. Scharer Rosa M. Ailabouni Monday Aug 5th, 2013 10:10-11:50 A1L-A Analog Circuits I Chr: Ming Gu, Shantanu Chakrabartty Track: Analog and Mixed Signal Integrated Circuits A1L-B Low Power Digital Circuit Design Techniques A1L-C Chr: Joanne Degroat Student Contest I Track: Digital Integrated Chr: Mohammed Ismail Circuits, SoC and NoC Track: INVITED ONLY A1L-D Design and Analysis for Power Systems and Power Electronics Chr: Hoi Lee, Ayman Fayed Track: Power Systems and Power Electronics A1L-E Design and Analysis of Linear and Non-Linear Systems Chr: Samuel Palermo Track: Linear and Non-linear Circuits and Systems A1L-F Emerging Technologues Chr: Khaled Salama Track: Emerging Technologies Monday Aug 5th, 2013 13:10-14:50 A2L-A Analog Circuits II Chr: Ming Gu, Shantanu Chakrabartty Track: Analog and Mixed Signal Integrated Circuits A2L-B Low Power VLSI Design Methodology Chr: Genevieve Sapijaszko Track: Digital Integrated Circuits, SoC and NoC A2L-C Student Contest II Chr: Sleiman Bou-Sleiman Track: INVITED ONLY A2L-D Power Management and Energy Harvesting Chr: Ayman Fayed, Hoi Lee Track: Power Management and Energy Harvesting A2L-E Oscillators and Chaotic Systems Chr: Samuel Palermo, Warsame Ali Track: Linear and Non-linear Circuits and Systems A2L-F Bioengineering Systems Chr: Khaled Salama Track: Bioengineering Systems and Bio Chips A4L-A Analog Design Techniques I Chr: Dong Ha Track: Analog and Mixed Signal Integrated Circuits A4L-B Imaging and Wireless Sensors Chr: Igor Filanovsky Track: Analog and Mixed Signal Integrated Circuits A4L-C Special Session: Characterization of Nano Materials and Circuits Chr: Nayla El-Kork Track: SPECIAL SESSION A4L-D Special Session: Power Management and Energy Harvesting Chr: Paul Furth Track: SPECIAL SESSION A4L-E Communication and Signal Processing Circuits Chr: Samuel Palermo Track: Linear and Non-linear Circuits and Systems A4L-F Sensing and Measurement of Biological Signals Chr: Hoda Abdel-Aty-Zohdy Track: Bioengineering Systems and Bio Chips B2L-A Analog Design Techniques II Chr: Valencia Koomson Track: Analog and Mixed Signal Integrated Circuits B2L-B VLSI Design Reliability Chr: Shantanu Chakrabartty, Gursharan Reehal Track: Digital Integrated Circuits, SoC and NoC B2L-D B2L-C Special Session: University and Delta-Sigma Modulators Industry Training in the Art of Chr: Vishal Saxena Electronics Track: Analog and Mixed Signal Chr: Steven Bibyk Integrated Circuits Track: SPECIAL SESSION B2L-E Radio Frequency Integrated Circuits Chr: Nathan Neihart, Mona Hella Track: RFICs, Microwave, and Optical Systems B2L-F Bio-inspired Green Technologies Chr: Hoda Abdel-Aty-Zohdy Track: Bio-inspired Green Technologies B3L-A Analog Design Techniques III Chr: Valencia Koomson Track: Analog and Mixed Signal Integrated Circuits B3L-B VLSI Design, Routing, and Testing Chr: Nader Rafla Track: Programmable Logic, VLSI, CAD and Layout B3L-C Special Session: High-Precision and High-Speed Data Converters I Chr: Samuel Palermo Track: SPECIAL SESSION B3L-D B3L-E Special Session: Advancing the RF/Optical Devices and Circuits Frontiers of Solar Energy Chr: Mona Hella, Nathan Neihart Chr: Michael Soderstrand Track: RFICs, Microwave, and Track: SPECIAL SESSION Optical Systems B5L-A Nyquist-Rate Data Converters Chr: Vishal Saxena Track: Analog and Mixed Signal Integrated Circuits B5L-B Digital Circuits Chr: Nader Rafla Track: Programmable Logic, VLSI, CAD and Layout B5L-C Special Session: High-Precision and High-Speed Data Converters II Chr: Samuel Palermo Track: SPECIAL SESSION B5L-D Special Session: RF-FPGA Circuits and Systems for Enhancing Access to Radio Spectrum (CAS-EARS) Chr: Arjuna Madanayake, Vijay Devabhaktuni Track: SPECIAL SESSION B5L-E B5L-F Analog and RF Circuit Memristors, DG-MOSFETS and Techniques Graphine FETs Chr: Igor Filanovsky Chr: Reyad El-Khazali Track: Analog and Mixed Signal Track: Nanoelectronics and Integrated Circuits Nanotechnology C2L-A Phase Locked Loops Chr: Chung-Chih Hung Track: Analog and Mixed Signal Integrated Circuits C2L-B Computer Arithmetic and Cryptography Chr: George Purdy Track: Programmable Logic, VLSI, CAD and Layout C2L-C Special Session: Reversible Computing Chr: Himanshu Thapliyal Track: SPECIAL SESSION C2L-D Special Session: Self-healing and Self-Adaptive Circuits and Systems Chr: Abhilash Goyal, Abhijit Chatterjee Track: SPECIAL SESSION C2L-E Digital Signal Processing-Media and Control Chr: Wasfy Mikhael, Steven Bibyk Track: Digital Signal Processing C2L-F Advances in Communications and Wireless Systems Chr: Sami Muhaidat Track: Communication and Wireless Systems C3L-A SAR Analog-to-Digital Converters Chr: Vishal Saxena Track: Analog and Mixed Signal Integrated Circuits C3L-B Real Time Systems Chr: Brian Dupaix, Abhilash Goyal Track: System Architectures C3L-C Image Processing and Interpretation Chr: Annajirao Garimella Track: Image Processing and Multimedia Systems C3L-D Special Session: Verification and Trusted Mixed Signal Electronics Development Chr: Greg Creech, Steven Bibyk Track: SPECIAL SESSION C3L-E Digital Signal Processing I Chr: Ying Liu Track: Digital Signal Processing C3L-F Wireless Systems I Chr: Sami Muhaidat Track: Communication and Wireless Systems C5L-A Wireless Systems II Chr: Sami Muhaidat Track: Communication and Wireless Systems C5L-B System Architectures Chr: Swarup Bhunia, Abhilash Goyal Track: System Architectures C5L-C Image Embedding Compression and Analysis Chr: Annajirao Garimella Track: Image Processing and Multimedia Systems C5L-D Low Power Datapath Design Chr: Wasfy Mikhael Track: Digital Integrated Circuits, SoC and NoC C5L-E Digital Signal Processing II Chr: Moataz AbdelWahab Track: Digital Signal Processing C5L-F Advances in Control Systems, Mechatronics, and Robotics Chr: Charna Parkey, Genevieve Sapijaszko Track: Control Systems, Mechatronics, and Robotics Monday Aug 5th, 2013 16:00-17:40 Tuesday Aug 6th, 2013 10:10-11:50 Tuesday Aug 6th, 2013 13:10-14:50 Tuesday Aug 6th, 2013 16:00-17:40 Wednesday Aug 7th, 2013 10:10-11:50 Wednesday Aug 7th, 2013 13:10-14:50 Wednesday Aug 7th, 2013 16:00-17:40 B3L-F Carbon Nanotube-based Sensors and Beyond Chr: Nayla El-Kork Track: Nanoelectronics and Nanotechnology 5
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RAID Structure  RAID – multiple disk drives provides reliability via redundancy  Increases the mean time to failure  Frequently combined with nonvolatile RAM (NVRAM) to cache the RAID array. This write-back cache is protected from data loss during power failures.  RAID is arranged into six different levels Operating System Concepts with Java – 8th Edition 12.20 Silberschatz, Galvin and Gagne ©2009
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Chapter 2: Operating-System Structures  Operating System Services  User Operating System Interface  System Calls  Types of System Calls  System Programs  Operating System Design and Implementation  Operating System Structure  Virtual Machines  Operating System Debugging  Operating System Generation  System Boot Operating System Concepts Essentials – 8th Edition 2.2 Silberschatz, Galvin and Gagne ©2011
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Chapter 1: Introduction  What Operating Systems Do  Computer-System Organization  Computer-System Architecture  Operating-System Structure  Operating-System Operations  Process Management  Memory Management  Storage Management  Protection and Security  Distributed Systems  Special-Purpose Systems  Computing Environments  Open-Source Operating Systems Operating System Concepts – 8th Edition 1.2 Silberschatz, Galvin and Gagne ©2009
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Software RAID vs. Hardware RAID • Software RAID implements fault tolerance through the server’s operating system • Hardware RAID is implemented through the server hardware • Independent of the operating system • Advantages of hardware RAID over software RAID: • Faster read and write response • The ability to place boot and system files on different RAID levels • The ability to ‘‘hot-swap’’ a failed disk • More setup options to retrieve damaged data © 2018 Cengage. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part, except for use as permitted in a license distributed with a certain product or service or otherwise on a password-protected website for classroom use. 31
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Simple levels of RAID • RAID 0 – Striping • RAID 1 – Mirrored Volumes • RAID 2 – Bit-level striping with parity distributed to one or more disks • RAID 3 – Byte-level striping with dedicated parity disk • RAID 4 – Block-level striping with dedicated parity disk • RAID 5 – Block-level striping with distributed parity • RAID 6 – Block-level striping with distributed double parity
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RAID (cont’d.) • Hardware RAID – Set of disks, separate disk controller – RAID array managed exclusively by RAID disk controller • Attached to server through server’s controller interface • Software RAID – Software implements, controls RAID techniques • Any hard disk type – Less expensive (no controller, disk array) – Performance rivals hardware RAID Network+ Guide to Networks, 5th Edition 42
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Chapter 5: CPU Scheduling  Basic Concepts  Scheduling Criteria  Scheduling Algorithms  Thread Scheduling  Multiple-Processor Scheduling  Operating Systems Examples  Algorithm Evaluation Operating System Concepts with Java – 8th Edition 5.2 Silberschatz, Galvin and Gagne ©2009
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Chapter 5: CPU Scheduling  Basic Concepts  Scheduling Criteria  Scheduling Algorithms  Multiple-Processor Scheduling  Real-Time Scheduling  Thread Scheduling  Operating Systems Examples  Java Thread Scheduling  Algorithm Evaluation Operating System Concepts 5.2 Silberschatz, Galvin and Gagne ©2005
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