Not Discussed Discuss ~ 50-60% of applications SRO will then ask if there are any other applications that panel wishes to discuss The remaining applications will not be discussed (applications receive criterion scores only) o Same after review of ~60% of SBIR applications
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Part 1: Introduction [28/43] SIPP Rotating Panel The lessons learned from ISDP were incorporated into the initial design of SIPP, which was used for the first 10 years of the survey. The original design of SIPP called for a nationally representative sample of individuals 15 years of age and older to be selected in households in the civilian noninstitutionalized population. Those individuals, along with others who subsequently lived with them, were to be interviewed once every 4 months over a 32-month period. To ease field procedures and spread the work evenly over the 4-month reference period for the interviewers, the Census Bureau randomly divided each panel into four rotation groups. Each rotation group was interviewed in a separate month. Four rotation groups thus constituted one cycle, called a wave, of interviewing for the entire panel. At each interview, respondents were asked to provide information covering the 4 months since the previous interview. The 4-month span was the reference period for the interview. The first sample, the 1984 Panel, began interviews in October 1983 with sample members in 19,878 households. The second sample, the 1985 Panel, began in February 1985. Subsequent panels began in February of each calendar year, resulting in concurrent administration of the survey in multiple panels. The original goal was to have each panel cover eight waves. However, a number of panels were terminated early because of insufficient funding. For example, the 1988 Panel had six waves; the 1989 Panel, part of which was folded into the 1990 Panel, was halted after three waves. In addition, the intent was for each SIPP panel to have an initial sample size of 20,000 households. That target was rarely achieved; again, budget issues were usually the reason. The 1996 redesign (discussed below) entailed a number of important changes. First, the 1996 Panel spans 4 years and encompasses 12 waves. The redesign has abandoned the overlapping panel structure of the earlier SIPP, but sample size has been substantially increased: the 1996 Panel had an initial sample size of 40,188 households.
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For More Information Jo Anne Goodnight NIH SBIR/STTR Program Coordinator Phone: 301- 435-2688 Fax: 301- 480-0146 Email: [email protected] Kay Etzler SBIR/STTR Program Analyst Email: [email protected] Lenka Fedorkova SBIR/STTR Program Analyst Email: [email protected] Subscribe to the SBIR/STTR List Serv: Email [email protected] with the following text in the message body: subscribe SBIR-STTR your name OFFICE OF EXTRAMURAL PROGRAMS: SBIR/STTR
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Developing Persuasive Grant Proposals Sponsored Research Office Skidmore College Saratoga Springs, NY Last thoughts (on this topic) – Alert the SRO to your project and plans for proposal development. – Work with the SRO to assure effective communications with all other College offices who need to know of your project and of the foundations you plan to pursue. – Inform the SRO of the foundation you plan to approach before you submit a proposal. – Work with the SRO to acquire College support (matching funds, cost sharing, dedicated resources, etc) of your externally funded project. – Report, by way of the SRO, the essentials of your project to a College database that stores information on all faculty proposals for external funding. RPDS 7.17.2006
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USDA SBIR HOMEPAGE www.nifa.usda.gov/fo/sbir • • • • • • • • • Program Information Solicitation (Request for Applications) Technical Abstracts Link to SBA and Other SBIR Programs Upcoming SBIR Conferences Find the Expert (CRIS & ARS) PowerPoint Presentation Success Stories Impact Newsletter SBIR
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PEAQ (old) • Criterion One: Mission and Integrity • Criterion Two: Preparing for the Future • Criterion Three: Student Learning and Effective Teaching • Criterion Four: Acquisition, Discovery, and Application of Knowledge • Criterion Five: Engagement and Service PATHWAYS (new) • Criterion One. Mission • Criterion Two. Integrity: Ethical and Responsible Conduct • Criterion Three. Teaching and Learning: Quality, Resources, and Support • Criterion Four. Teaching and Learning: Evaluation and Improvement • Criterion Five. Resources, Planning, and Institutional Effectiveness
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Application Submission • Application Submission Requires Many Steps to Complete the Process • Download the USDA SBIR Solicitation at http://www.nifa.usda.gov/funding/sbir/sbir.html • Electronic Submission is Mandatory via Grants.gov • Obtain Data Universal Number System (DUNS) Number • Register with System for Award Management (SAM) (replaced Central Contractor Registry (CCR) • Register your Business with Grants.gov • http://www.grants.gov/applicants/get_registered.jsp • Register your company with the Small Business Administration (SBA) • https://www.sbir.gov/registration SBIR
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SBIR/STTR: 3-Phase Program • PHASE I  Feasibility Study  $100K and 6- month (SBIR) or 12- month (STTR) Award •PHASE II  Full Research/R&D  $750K and 2-year Award (SBIR & STTR)  Pre-requisite: Phase I award •PHASE III  Commercialization Stage  Must use non-SBIR/STTR Funds 9 SBIR/STTR Program Overview 9
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University and Government Scientist Involvement in USDA SBIR Program • Strongly encouraged • Scientists may serve as consultants or receive a subcontract (limited to no more than 1/3 of Phase I award or 1/2 of Phase II award) and continue to work full time at their home institution • Scientists may serve as the principal investigator on an SBIR grant, by reducing employment at their home institution to 49% for the duration of the grant and if the SBIR research is performed someplace other than their research lab • It is usually not acceptable for university or government scientists to serve as consultants and have all the research done in their lab SBIR
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Question or concern? Program director, SRO, or grants management? Before submitting application: program (or if question is about a study section, SRO) After submission, before review: SRO After review, program (scientific issues) or grants management (budget or policy issues). General rule: institutional administrators talk to grants management, investigators talk to program. Just-in-time: grants management. PLEASE SUBMIT ASAP IF REQUESTED. After award: program (scientific), grants management (budget or policy)
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