Assignment due by the start of class on 9/27 Work the following two lab exercises in the embedded systems lab across from the copier on the second floor of Rhodes Robinson. Please make and appointment to have the room opened. Submit the completed exercises electronically in Moodle or in hardcopy at the start of class on 9/27 Exercise 1 Exercise 2
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EAB Campaign #2 GOALS/RESULTS Read my first original starfish message to schedule appointment: 15/22 achieved Those who have read first appointment email schedule an appointment with me within two week after reading: 2/15 achieved The ones who made appointment with me within two weeks after email were successful in coming off probation: 0/2 achieved The ones who made appointment with me within two week after email were successful in avoiding suspension: ½ achieved Read majority of my messages: 19/22 achieved Made an advising appointment with me (12/22) and total that made advising appointment including alternate advisor include additional 3 = 15/22 achieved Those that had advising appointment avoided suspension: 8/15 achieved Made an appointment with me at least by the end of registration week. (11/12 that did make appointment): 11/22 achieved Made an appointment with me at least prior to last day of Withdrawal (5/12 that did make appointment): 5/22 achieved Made an appointment with me at least two week prior to pre-registration week (5/12 that did make appointment): 5/22 achieved 10 Avoided Academic Suspension: 11/22 achieved Back in Good Academic Standing: 6/22 achieved  
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COURSE Assignments: (See Blackboard for descriptions) Take Home Final due December 11 5PM (30 points) Assignment 1 is due September 13 5PM (Age of infinite storage) (10 points) Assignment 2 is due September 20 5PM (Horizontal data) (10 points) Assignment 3 is due September 27 5PM (Vertical data) (10 points) Assignment 4 is due October 4 5PM (Relational) (10 points) Assignment 5 is due October 11 5PM (Disks, pages, buffers) (10 points) Assignment 6 is due October 18 5PM (Files) (10 points) Assignment 7 is due October 25 5PM (Indexes) (10 points) Assignment 8 is due November 1 5PM (Transactions) (10 points) Assignment 9 is due November 8 5PM (Query Processing) (10 points) Assignment 10 is due November 15 5PM (Data Mining) (10 points) Assignment 11 is due November 29 5PM (Normalization) (10 points) Assignment 12 is due December 6 5PM (Recovery) (10 points) The Term Paper is due December 11 5PM Grades will be based on a grade curve of your total points out of (150 points) 300 points On all assignments, you must work alone. Please do not share your work with anyone or be shared with by anyone else. Submit assignments and paper through BLACKBOARD.
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Final Value Stream Map C.S. Mott s Children s Emergency Services Current State Value Stream Map Discharge (75%) Updated 14 February 2017 Start: Order discharge End: Departure from CES Patient Tech: Patient 32% Triage Primary RN Eval Start: RN/Tech takes patient to room/triage bay End: Documentation completed & handoff Start: Nurse arrives in room End: Documentation completed Tech: EMR, headsets Tech: EMR Provider, RN EMR 18 min Diagnosis 25% Screening Process Initial Provider Eval Start: Determine if patient is in right place End: Documentation completion Tech: EMR, headsets Triage RN/Tech Primary RN Pnt Room/Triage Bay Patient Room 9 min 6 min Start: Mid-level provider (student, resident, PA) arrives End: Documentation complete 93.1% Front Desk 4.5 min - Triage & Primary RN Eval. 68% Start: Attending arrives 75% End: Provider presents physical assessment and plan Tech: EMR 75.9% Screener/Clerk/Badger Attending Staffing Order Entry Attending Evaluation Start: Order started End: Order ended Start: Attending arrives End: Attending leaves - Imaging Lab Consultants Tech: Disposition Admit (18%) Start: Attending reviews data End: Enter disposition into EMR Start: Order admit End Departure from CES Treatment Tech: EMR Tech: None Tech: EMR Procedures Medical Administration Nursing Care Teaching Pharmacy Tech: EMR Tech: Provider Mid-Level Provider Attending Physician Mid-Level Provider Attending Physician Patient Room Staffing Area Staffing Area Patient Room 10 min 3 min 4 min 4 min Physician, RN, etc. 23 min 80.5% 83.1% 93.6% 92.7% Patient Room, lab, etc. 94.3% Any Provider EMR Tech: 130 min EMR Start: Triage Nurse takes patient to room End: Primary RN eval and Triage documentation complete - Observation (7%) 88 min Start: Order observation End: Order discharge or admit - Tech: EMR, headsets Tech: Triage RN/Tech/Primary RN Providers, RN Patient Room Pnt Room/Triage Bay 308 min 15 min - 79.1% 1.5 min .3 min 4.5 min 6 min 9 min 6 min 10 min 3 min 4 min 4 min 93 min - Discharge 18 min 23 min Admit 130 min Median Total Time: Discharge LOS = 3.3 hours Admit LOS = 5.5 hours (Collected 10/1/16 – 12/31/16) Total LOS from Map (minutes) Discharged 182.3 Admitted 294.3 Observation 472.3 Total LOS from Map (Hrs) Discharged 3.0 Admitted 4.9 Observation 7.9 Observation 308 min
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Lactation Support Program ELIGIBILITY & REQUIREMENTS Eligible Employees & Students Any Pasadena Area Community College District employee or student desiring to express breast milk shall be accommodated, and will be eligible for use of designated Lactation Support Program (LSP) rooms. Human Resources Home (link) Location The District shall make reasonable efforts to provide nursing employees and students with the use of an LSP room or other location, other than a toilet stall or locker room, to express in private. The room or location shall be shielded from view and free from intrusion of others. The rooms will be centrally located to accommodate employees and students that work or attend classes in various buildings; however, the rooms will not necessarily be located in the building in which the employee works or student attends class. An employee assigned to a private unshared office may use that room. Designated LSP rooms shall contain a supportive chair, a table, access to an electrical outlet, adequate ventilation, and a door that can be locked. Room Access Access to LSP room will be unscheduled and on a first–come, first-served basis. Any employee who wishes to use an LSP room must first contact Human Resources to arrange lactation support accommodations, and to be provided instructions for use of and access to the room. Students must contact the Student Health Services office to receive instructions regarding use of the student LSP room. Use of Room The LSP rooms are for the exclusive use of nursing employees and students, on a first–come, first-served basis, and one at a time. Each nursing employee or student user of the room is responsible for keeping the room clean and removing personal items when leaving. If an employee or student finds the room in disarray, she is to contact the Human Resources Office or Student Health Services Office. Employee Break Time The District shall provide a reasonable amount of unpaid break time to accommodate an employee who desires to express breast milk. The supervisor shall permit the employee to take breaks to express whenever and as often as needed. Whenever possible, the break time shall run concurrent with any break time already provided to the employee. For example, employees who work 5 hours or more are provided two (2) twenty (20) minute paid rest breaks and one (1) one-half (1/2) hour unpaid meal break; employees who work less than 5 hours are provided one (1) twenty 20 minute paid rest break. Therefore, an employee who works eight (8) hours would have three (3) provided breaks; and an employee who works four (4) hours would have one (1) provided break. An employee may need other breaks, in addition to the provided breaks. The frequency of the breaks needed by an employee, as well as the duration, may vary. Termination of Accommodation An employee or student may use the LSP room for as long as needed. When an employee no longer has need of lactation support, she must inform Human Resources and her supervisor, and return to her regular break schedule. When a student no longer has need of lactation support, she must inform the Student Health Services Office. LSP Introduction (link) Eligibility & Requirements (link) FLSA Nursing Mothers Rights (link) LSP Accommodation Request Form (link) Designated Locations (link) Campus Map (link)
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Time Barbie Tootle Hayes Cape Cartoon Room I Cartoon Room II Suzanne M. Scharer Rosa M. Ailabouni Monday Aug 5th, 2013 10:10-11:50 A1L-A Analog Circuits I Chr: Ming Gu, Shantanu Chakrabartty Track: Analog and Mixed Signal Integrated Circuits A1L-B Low Power Digital Circuit Design Techniques A1L-C Chr: Joanne Degroat Student Contest I Track: Digital Integrated Chr: Mohammed Ismail Circuits, SoC and NoC Track: INVITED ONLY A1L-D Design and Analysis for Power Systems and Power Electronics Chr: Hoi Lee, Ayman Fayed Track: Power Systems and Power Electronics A1L-E Design and Analysis of Linear and Non-Linear Systems Chr: Samuel Palermo Track: Linear and Non-linear Circuits and Systems A1L-F Emerging Technologues Chr: Khaled Salama Track: Emerging Technologies Monday Aug 5th, 2013 13:10-14:50 A2L-A Analog Circuits II Chr: Ming Gu, Shantanu Chakrabartty Track: Analog and Mixed Signal Integrated Circuits A2L-B Low Power VLSI Design Methodology Chr: Genevieve Sapijaszko Track: Digital Integrated Circuits, SoC and NoC A2L-C Student Contest II Chr: Sleiman Bou-Sleiman Track: INVITED ONLY A2L-D Power Management and Energy Harvesting Chr: Ayman Fayed, Hoi Lee Track: Power Management and Energy Harvesting A2L-E Oscillators and Chaotic Systems Chr: Samuel Palermo, Warsame Ali Track: Linear and Non-linear Circuits and Systems A2L-F Bioengineering Systems Chr: Khaled Salama Track: Bioengineering Systems and Bio Chips A4L-A Analog Design Techniques I Chr: Dong Ha Track: Analog and Mixed Signal Integrated Circuits A4L-B Imaging and Wireless Sensors Chr: Igor Filanovsky Track: Analog and Mixed Signal Integrated Circuits A4L-C Special Session: Characterization of Nano Materials and Circuits Chr: Nayla El-Kork Track: SPECIAL SESSION A4L-D Special Session: Power Management and Energy Harvesting Chr: Paul Furth Track: SPECIAL SESSION A4L-E Communication and Signal Processing Circuits Chr: Samuel Palermo Track: Linear and Non-linear Circuits and Systems A4L-F Sensing and Measurement of Biological Signals Chr: Hoda Abdel-Aty-Zohdy Track: Bioengineering Systems and Bio Chips B2L-A Analog Design Techniques II Chr: Valencia Koomson Track: Analog and Mixed Signal Integrated Circuits B2L-B VLSI Design Reliability Chr: Shantanu Chakrabartty, Gursharan Reehal Track: Digital Integrated Circuits, SoC and NoC B2L-D B2L-C Special Session: University and Delta-Sigma Modulators Industry Training in the Art of Chr: Vishal Saxena Electronics Track: Analog and Mixed Signal Chr: Steven Bibyk Integrated Circuits Track: SPECIAL SESSION B2L-E Radio Frequency Integrated Circuits Chr: Nathan Neihart, Mona Hella Track: RFICs, Microwave, and Optical Systems B2L-F Bio-inspired Green Technologies Chr: Hoda Abdel-Aty-Zohdy Track: Bio-inspired Green Technologies B3L-A Analog Design Techniques III Chr: Valencia Koomson Track: Analog and Mixed Signal Integrated Circuits B3L-B VLSI Design, Routing, and Testing Chr: Nader Rafla Track: Programmable Logic, VLSI, CAD and Layout B3L-C Special Session: High-Precision and High-Speed Data Converters I Chr: Samuel Palermo Track: SPECIAL SESSION B3L-D B3L-E Special Session: Advancing the RF/Optical Devices and Circuits Frontiers of Solar Energy Chr: Mona Hella, Nathan Neihart Chr: Michael Soderstrand Track: RFICs, Microwave, and Track: SPECIAL SESSION Optical Systems B5L-A Nyquist-Rate Data Converters Chr: Vishal Saxena Track: Analog and Mixed Signal Integrated Circuits B5L-B Digital Circuits Chr: Nader Rafla Track: Programmable Logic, VLSI, CAD and Layout B5L-C Special Session: High-Precision and High-Speed Data Converters II Chr: Samuel Palermo Track: SPECIAL SESSION B5L-D Special Session: RF-FPGA Circuits and Systems for Enhancing Access to Radio Spectrum (CAS-EARS) Chr: Arjuna Madanayake, Vijay Devabhaktuni Track: SPECIAL SESSION B5L-E B5L-F Analog and RF Circuit Memristors, DG-MOSFETS and Techniques Graphine FETs Chr: Igor Filanovsky Chr: Reyad El-Khazali Track: Analog and Mixed Signal Track: Nanoelectronics and Integrated Circuits Nanotechnology C2L-A Phase Locked Loops Chr: Chung-Chih Hung Track: Analog and Mixed Signal Integrated Circuits C2L-B Computer Arithmetic and Cryptography Chr: George Purdy Track: Programmable Logic, VLSI, CAD and Layout C2L-C Special Session: Reversible Computing Chr: Himanshu Thapliyal Track: SPECIAL SESSION C2L-D Special Session: Self-healing and Self-Adaptive Circuits and Systems Chr: Abhilash Goyal, Abhijit Chatterjee Track: SPECIAL SESSION C2L-E Digital Signal Processing-Media and Control Chr: Wasfy Mikhael, Steven Bibyk Track: Digital Signal Processing C2L-F Advances in Communications and Wireless Systems Chr: Sami Muhaidat Track: Communication and Wireless Systems C3L-A SAR Analog-to-Digital Converters Chr: Vishal Saxena Track: Analog and Mixed Signal Integrated Circuits C3L-B Real Time Systems Chr: Brian Dupaix, Abhilash Goyal Track: System Architectures C3L-C Image Processing and Interpretation Chr: Annajirao Garimella Track: Image Processing and Multimedia Systems C3L-D Special Session: Verification and Trusted Mixed Signal Electronics Development Chr: Greg Creech, Steven Bibyk Track: SPECIAL SESSION C3L-E Digital Signal Processing I Chr: Ying Liu Track: Digital Signal Processing C3L-F Wireless Systems I Chr: Sami Muhaidat Track: Communication and Wireless Systems C5L-A Wireless Systems II Chr: Sami Muhaidat Track: Communication and Wireless Systems C5L-B System Architectures Chr: Swarup Bhunia, Abhilash Goyal Track: System Architectures C5L-C Image Embedding Compression and Analysis Chr: Annajirao Garimella Track: Image Processing and Multimedia Systems C5L-D Low Power Datapath Design Chr: Wasfy Mikhael Track: Digital Integrated Circuits, SoC and NoC C5L-E Digital Signal Processing II Chr: Moataz AbdelWahab Track: Digital Signal Processing C5L-F Advances in Control Systems, Mechatronics, and Robotics Chr: Charna Parkey, Genevieve Sapijaszko Track: Control Systems, Mechatronics, and Robotics Monday Aug 5th, 2013 16:00-17:40 Tuesday Aug 6th, 2013 10:10-11:50 Tuesday Aug 6th, 2013 13:10-14:50 Tuesday Aug 6th, 2013 16:00-17:40 Wednesday Aug 7th, 2013 10:10-11:50 Wednesday Aug 7th, 2013 13:10-14:50 Wednesday Aug 7th, 2013 16:00-17:40 B3L-F Carbon Nanotube-based Sensors and Beyond Chr: Nayla El-Kork Track: Nanoelectronics and Nanotechnology 5
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LETTER OF INTENT The effect of high intensity interval training versus moderate intensity training on anthropometric and cardiovascular health in children who are overweight or obese: A pilot study. PI Name: Ashwin Agrawal, DO, MA Stony Brook Children’s Hospital HSC T-11, Room 040 Stony Brook, NY 11794-8111 631-358-6106 [email protected] Funding Path Academic Pediatric Association Resident Investigator (RIA) Primary Mentor Name Peter Morelli, MD, FACC [email protected] Residency Program Director Name Robyn Blair, MD [email protected] Department Chair Name Margaret McGovern, MD [email protected] Participation Statement If funded, I agree to participate in any conference calls and/or in-person grantee meetings WORK IN PROGRESS…. PROBLEM, BACKGROUND AND SIGNIFICANCE: Approximately 30% of children in the United States are overweight/obese leading to a public health epidemic.[1] Pediatric obesity is linked to numerous acute and chronic health conditions including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancers, hypertension, and significant increase in all-cause mortality.[2, 3] Diet and exercise decrease the risk of obesity.[4] However, only 27% of children perform the recommended 60 minutes of daily exercise. [5] The American Academy of Pediatrics endorses that pediatricians assist children and their families with lifestyle modification such as diet and exercise to improve the physical, cognitive and mental state of children.[4] Fit Kids for Life (FKFL) is a 10 week lifestyle modification program developed and offered by Stony Brook Children’s since 1998 which incorporates nutritional guidance, wellness and a supervised exercise regimen for obese children in our community. Efficacy of pediatric obesity interventions is equivocal with many studies noting high attrition rates and poor long term adherence.[6-8] Factors that contribute to high attrition include: difficulty of exercise, repetitiveness/boredom from exercise routine or that weight loss was not visible. [6] Therefore, it is important to develop a novel, time efficient modality that will motivate, captivate and promote exercise and healthy nutrition for children to help reduce rates of pediatric obesity. Ideal intensity and duration of exercise programs for effective weight loss and improved health in pediatric populations is unclear.[6] Most pediatric obesity programs, including FKFL, have utilized moderate intensity training (MIT) which consists of exercise in 60 minute circuits.[6, 7] High intensity interval training programs (HIIT) have emerged and are effective at reducing weight and cardiovascular risk markers in adults.[9] Less is known abou the role of HIIT in the overweight/obese pediatric population. Early studies suggest that HIIT may have improved health benefits for children and adolescents. [10] Compared to MIT, HIIT programs employ short bursts of near maxim exercise intensity (HR ≥75% HR max) followed by brief rest periods and have a shorter duration (generally 30minutes). [10] HIIT programs have been found to be attractive to children and adolescents for several reasons including: 1) HIIT more closely mimics typical movements of children - short bouts (< 15 seconds) and high intensity, 2) HIIT can be delivered in a shorter timeframe, and 3) HIIT paradigms are more like playing a game which may decrease boredom, increase enjoyment and promote higher adherence.[11-13] Currently used outcome measures in pediatric obesity studies (such as height, weight, waist to hip ratio, Body mass Index [BMI], heart rate [HR] and blood pressure [BP]) may not be ideal. For example, BMI is influenced by linear growth and ineffective at quantifying body composition; waist circumference, while promoted by the WHO as a valid predictor of cardiovascular disease, is fraught with measurement reliability issues; and vascular health may not be reflected by BP and HR changes alone. Three dimensional (3D) body imaging is a new technique which may offer greater reliability in measuring body circumferences and inferring body composition. In addition, bio-electrical impedance has shown to evaluate fat content and muscle mass fairly accurately. In terms of cardiovascular health, brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) is a safe, non-invasive technique which correlates strongly with coronary endothelial function and predicts cardiovascular disease.[14, 15] In the adult literature, FMD has revealed improved vascular health following exercise and diet, even in the absence of weight loss. Therefore, FMD may be a strong indicator of cardiovascular improvement following the FKFL program, and this outcome may reflect program success despite lack of change in anthropometric measures. Studies show improved vascular health (FMD) in adults even when body composition and weight have not changed, thus FMD may potentially be a more sensitive measure of exercise (and overall program) effect.[15] SPECIFIC AIMS: Specific Aim 1: To determine if high intensity interval training (HIIT) is a better alternative to moderate intensity training (MIT) for improvements in a) BMI and weight loss, b) body composition by a novel 3D body scanning method and bioelectric impedance and and, c) cardiovascular health measured by FMD and heart rate variability in children and adolescents who are overweight and obese. Specific Aim 2a: To determine if children/adolescents who complete HIIT program have better attendance and long term adherence to lifestyle changes compared to the MIT group. Specific Aim 2b: To determine if children in the HIIT program report higher enjoyment and satisfaction compared to the MIT group. HYPOTHESES: Hypothesis 1: Children who complete the FKFL HIIT protocol will have greater improvements in CV health (as measured by BMI, body composition, vital signs, and FMD) as compared Commented [1]: I would remove this line. BIA is not
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