Linked/W Eng 071 19 EDU 100 01 ENG 091 01 MAT 001 06 HUM 100 01 PSY 101 05 EDU 101 01 SOC 101 05 SOC 101 01 MAT 001 02 ENG 071 03 ENG 101 10 PSY 122 02 ENG 071 10 ENG 101 11 ENG 101 25 Time 10:30-11:20 10:30-11:45 8:30-10:20 10:30-11:30 7:30-8:20 1:30-2:45 10:30-11:45 9-10:45 8:30-9:20 9-10:15 9:30-10:20 11:30-12:20 10:30-11:45 12:30-1:20 9-10:15 12:30-1:20 10:30-11:20 9:30-10:20 6-8:45 pm 9-11:45 9:30-10:20 8:30-9:20 12:30-1:45 12:30-1:20 9:30-10:20 Room HH 219 SA 102 AR Lib 3 AR 211 NA G 9 NA 211 BH 002 NA G 11 SA 006 AR 211 HH 114 NA G11 BH 002 NA G11 SA 006 HH 116 ENG 071 54 ENG 071 52 PSY 122 52 HUM 101 50 SOC 101 50 Day MWF MW MWF T MWF T-R MW TR MWF MWF MWF MWF TR MWF TR MWF MWF MWF T S MWF MWF WF MWF MWF ENG 101 64 PSY 123 50 ENG 071 61 PSY 101 59 ENG 071 64 COM 103 52 PSY 100 51 PSY 101 64 TR WF TR TR TR TR WF TR 9-10:15 12-1:15 1:30-2:45 9-10:15 9-10:15 10:30-11:45 10:30-11:45 7:30-8:45 LC 318 LC 113 LF 205 LC 211 LC 110 LC 201 LP 405 LC 104 SOC 101 30 NA G 11 LD 301 LF 205 LC 207 LF 214 LC 115 Instructor TBA TBA Black Delmonaco TBA Pisarik Higgins Ogburn Alessi Caruso Laughlin Davidson Regan Laughlin Davidson TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA Schleicher TBA Regan Ryan TBA Hutchinson TBA Gibbons TBA McKeon,R 11 Gray Keen IDS Sec IDS 101 01 IDS 101 02 IDS 101 03 IDS 101 04 IDS 101 05 IDS 101 06 IDS 101 07 IDS 101 08 IDS 101 09 IDS 101 10 IDS 101 11 IDS 101 12 IDS 101 13 IDS 101 14 IDS 101 15 IDS 101 16 IDS 101 17 IDS 101 18 IDS 101 30 IDS 101 31 IDS 101 50 IDS 101 51 IDS 101 52 IDS 101 53 IDS 101 54 IDS 101 55 IDS 101 56 IDS 101 57 IDS 101 58 IDS 101 59 IDS 101 60 IDS 101 61 IDS 101 62 IDS 101 63 Instructor TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA DAY M M M R W R M R F W W F T M T M W F T S M M W M F W R F T T R T W R Time 8:30-9:20 9:30-10:20 10:30-11:20 10:30-11:20 9:30-10:20 12:30-1:20 12-12:20 11-11:50 9:30-10:20 10:30-11:20 8:30-9:20 10:30-11:20 12-12:50 1:30-2:20 8-8:50 1:30-2:20 10:30-11:20 8:30-9:20 5-5:50 pm 12-12:50 8:30-9:20 9:30-10:20 11:30-12:20 11:30-12:20 8:30-9:20 8-8:50 8-8:50 1:30-2:20 12:30-1:20 10:30-11:20 10:30-11:20 9:30-10:20 9:30-10:20 9-9:50 Room NA 102 NA 102 HH 213 AR 110 HH 112 SA 006 BH 002 AR-Lib 3 BH 103 NA 211 SA 103 SA 103 BH 002 HH 212 HH 310 HH 220 NA 117 BH 103 NA G9 NA G9 LC 209 LC 209 LC 112 LC 105 LC 306 LC 306 LC 110 LC 213 A LC 213 LP 403 LF 205 LC 118 LC 214 LP 405
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bond 1.00% 0.99% 0.95% 0.89% 0.81% 0.71% 0.59% 0.45% 0.31% 0.16% 0.00% s&p500 0.00% 0.16% 0.31% 0.45% 0.59% 0.71% 0.81% 0.89% 0.95% 0.99% 1.00% 100.511 100.931 100.000 100.253 100.625 100.402 100.458 112.560 104.676 120.472 111.264 100.462 101.745 100.557 101.014 100.000 100.176 100.481 100.330 100.364 112.188 104.607 117.156 109.198 100.442 101.654 100.592 101.162 100.000 100.112 100.330 100.260 100.276 111.464 104.427 113.237 106.905 100.480 101.546 100.561 101.393 100.000 100.062 100.170 100.168 100.190 110.313 104.131 108.851 104.490 100.536 101.422 100.392 101.578 100.000 100.017 100.005 100.045 100.093 108.717 103.743 104.476 102.268 100.524 101.277 100.328 101.471 100.012 100.079 100.000 100.073 100.105 106.990 103.500 101.517 101.107 100.512 101.239 100.636 101.218 100.000 100.390 100.411 100.524 100.441 105.665 103.734 102.748 102.429 100.644 101.479 100.674 100.912 100.000 100.859 101.066 101.155 101.006 104.578 104.064 110.842 106.870 100.639 101.836 100.076 100.534 100.000 101.284 101.439 101.407 101.385 104.130 103.176 121.875 112.237 100.183 102.002 100.601 100.815 101.616 101.368 101.574 101.333 101.520 110.939 101.852 123.302 114.554 100.000 101.743 100.498 101.415 101.151 100.000 100.297 100.245 100.081 114.037 107.580 109.876 107.572 100.197 102.290 EXP-SM MA(20) MA(100) DCC-IMA (recursive) DCC-MR (recursive) DCC-ASY (recursive) DCC-RANK (recursive) OGARCH1 (recursive) OGARCH2 (recursive) FIXED (sample 1-1000) FIXED (daily update) DCC-ASY-GEN (recursive) DCC-GEN (recursive) Average 100.238 100.874 100.000 100.165 100.328 100.287 100.285 108.954 103.868 111.942 106.909 100.165 101.400 Table 158: sample variance of minimum variance portfolios subject to a required return of 1 (sample: 1001-end) 42
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The Course Mix • In 2013-14 MMCC ran 347 different course titles – 5 had more than 1,000 students enrolled – 301 had less than 100 students enrolled SPE.101 PSY.212 CIS.13 0 NUR.1 50 ECE.101 ART.1 15 MAT.2 17 PTA.1 05 ALH.212 PTA.1 26 ART.2 30 PSY.283 RAD.2 21 PSY.285 PED.103 BIS.12 6 HED.130 PSY.101 ECO.202 BIS.2 64 NUR.151 ART.135 BUS.231 WLD.130 PTA.106 ALH.213 PTA.130 CIS.1 32 SPE.105 RAD.226 AMS.126 PED.110 BIS.2 34 HED.134 MAT.104 PHL.201 HIS.102 GEL.101 MAT.126 MAT.102 BIS.138 PTA.110 PED.255 PTA.131 PSY.2 95 AMS.214 RAD.230 ACC.252 PHT.115 CIS.225 PED.119 CIS.10 0 PSY.205 BUS.162 NUR.1 21 WLD.125 ECE.112 BIS.25 0 PTA.111 AMS.125 PTA.140 SOC.250 AMS.223 HRA.1 98 CJS.223 ENG.225 ALH.125 PED.203 ENG.111 CHM.105 ACC.211 NUR.124 CIS.221 CIS.135 DRF.210 PTA.115 HRA.116 AMS.2 06 DRF.201 ART.240 HRA.220 BIO.11 0 SPE.205 NUR.133 PED.226 MAT.105 SPN.101 MAT.116 BUS.202 PSY.240 RAD.110 ART.2 15 PTA.1 16 ACC.251 AMS.22 2 HRA.102 CJS.222 ACC.205 BIO.201 DRF.2 50 HUM.251 ENG.202 ENG.222 HIS.21 1 ENG.112 HUM.102 BIS.142 IND.101 ECE.114 HUM.210 CHM.106 HRA.106 HRA.104 CJS.23 3 BUS.1 05 PHT.113 WLD.226 CIS.271 HIS.25 1 BIO.101 BIO.142 HIS.212 REL.111 PSY.281 IND.113 RAD.215 AMS.10 4 ALH.214 HRA.215 ART.245 PHY.212 CIS.2 90 PHT.114 ACC.280 ECE.150 MID.103 SOC.101 SSC.200 SOC.202 SOC.200 DRF.101 DRF.220 DRF.105 HRA.223 ALH.230 CJS.221 CIS.255 PHT.104 ECE.208 REL.2 91 ART.247 TAI.207 AMS.232 ENG.110 ENG.104 HUM.101 BIS.12 0 BIS.12 7 ALH.112 ART.2 35 WLD.126 RAD.1 15 EDU.290 CIS.26 0 PHT.1 05 PED.132 REL.292 BIS.23 8 TAI.20 8 AMS.232 ALH.10 0 POL.20 1 BIS.164 BIS.140 CJS.202 BIS.200 CJS.220 WLD.245 RAD.130 BIO.131 CJS.205 PHT.106 RAD.225 ART.206 CIS.295 MAT.230 WLD.227 MAT.21 2 MAT.12 4 NUR.22 1 NUR.12 5 SOC.289 CJS.204 PHY.103 BUS.225 AMS.124 BIO.245 HRA.10 5 RAD.20 0 PHL.210 BIS.230 SOC.291 HED.132 BUS.151 BIO.210 NUR.222 NUR.128 EDU.107 BIS.1 36 ART.137 CIS.1 75 HRA.108 MAT.060 HRA.204 RAD.201 SOC.222 ECE.207 TAI.2 77 NUR.132 ECO.20 1 HIS.223 NUR.223 NUR.152 PHY.101 BUS.25 0 ECE.1 13 ENG.205 HRA.205 ALH.22 0 HRA.285 HUM.183 SSC.1 11 JOR.120 MAT.226 PED.14 5 HUM.200 BUS.122 NUR.224 SPN.102 SPE.257 CJS.203 AMS.205 AMS.110 HRA.225 RAD.175 IND.116 BUS.241 AMS.116 MID.102 HED.136 WLD.246 PHL.220 ART.105 CHM.111 PSC.101 PTA.101 BIS.254 ART.211 ART.152 WLD.127 RAD.180 CIS.195 CJS.206 ART.236 PSY.103 ENG.206 ART.252 MAT.101 HED.1 15 DRF.120 NUR.228 NUR.127 SPN.201 BIS.240 ART.239 WLD.225 ENG.0 98 CJS.231 CJS.224 BIS.236 AMS.232 MID.1 01 BUS.289 HIS.10 1 MUS.275 NUR.227 ART.130 NUR.130 TAI.275 BIS.255 BUS.1 71 BIS.260 REL.290 CJS.23 2 ECE.201 BIO.135 ACC.2 61 PHL.250 CIS.280 SCI.20 0 SOC.220 NUR.2 25 CJS.200 NUR.1 34 PHY.211 BUS.255 FRN.101 CIS.27 0 DRF.280 ECE.20 2 GER.101 MAT.2 25 ART.254 HRA.2 15 CJS.203 BIO.141 BUS.153 NUR.226 BIO.100 MAT.170 IND.14 0 CJS.201 BIO.203 ALH.250 HRA.240 ECE.20 6 RAD.217 PHY.105 BUS.291 IND.10 2 FRN.102 ACC.201 ART.1 10 ECO.110 ANT.170 HUM.205 ART.2 05 CIS.19 0 CHM.112 PTA.1 25 ACC.231 ENG.213 RAD.2 20 POL.250 CIS.17 6 ART.2 41 PHY.1 06
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The Rightsholder is… Generally, the person who creates the work. Joint Authorship-When two or more authors work together to create a work the copyright is shared between them.  Authors must decide to work collaboratively  Each author must contribute significantly to the copyrightable expression to the work  “Merged into inseparable or interdependent parts of a unitary whole”
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Entrepreneurship: is it good enough to be social? John F. McVea and Michael J. Naughton Introduction • The term Social Entrepreneurship has experienced a huge growth in influence over that last decade. The literature proposes a number of advantages to social entrepreneurship as a frame of reference: • Promoting innovation within non-profits • Leveraging and focusing scarce philanthropic resources • Faster response to strategic challenges • Infusion of business skills to non-business world • Involvement of non government assets in social problems • Creation of hybrid (blurred) organizations between for profit and non profit worlds. It is widely observed that practice has outpaced theoretical development leading to little agreement on definitions or frameworks for social entrepreneurship. We believe that widespread and unchallenged acceptance of the term Social Entrepreneurship masks some dangers and has contributed to confusion in the field. We believe that if we apply some insights from Catholic Social Teaching to the issue of social entrepreneurship we can move beyond the false dichotomy of Entrepreneurship/ Social Entrepreneurship and identify three specific entrepreneurial strategies which support a more robust discussion of the nature of the work that is entrepreneurship. We believe that the field would benefit from spending less time discussing social entrepreneurship and more time discussion the nature of the good entrepreneur. • • • • • The dangers of naïve acceptance of Social Entrepreneurship • • • The rhetorical risk: • Narrow definition: if S.E. is simply used to rebrand non-profits then much of the value of the new activities, hybrid design, stimulation of new resources and innovation is lost. • Implied dichotomy: if “good” ventures are termed “social” it can imply that other forms of entrepreneurship are “asocial” or “anti social” • Boundarylessness: In contrast, if all business activities are deemed “social”, to some degree or other, then the term loses all meaning focus on the distinctive phenomenon that is S.E. Despite these risks we are more concerned with a risk beyond rhetoric; the risk of undermining the meaning of work, particularly from the perspective of Catholic Social Teaching. While this perspective is drawn from the Catholic tradition, accepting the content of CST does not require acceptance of Catholic faith (Guitan, 2009). The three goods of social entrepreneurship • We are concerned by the side-effects of a concentration thesis that suggests that the moral responsibilities of entrepreneurship can be concentrated in a subset of businesses called social enterprises, presumably leaving other enterprise to simply concentrate on serving themselves. • We are concerned by the impact such a concentration thesis could have on the conception of the meaning of work beyond the world of social enterprise. • We are concerned with how such an approach can focus attention solely on the altruistic contributions of entrepreneurial ventures as the sole measure of their contribution to the Common Good • Instead we propose that, rather than trying to determine the difference between entrepreneurship and social entrepreneurship, it would be more productive to focus on the questions “What is Good Entrepreneurship? What action and activities define that goodness?” • We further propose that, by apply the perspective of Catholic Social Teaching, we can identify three specific strategies through which entrepreneurial ventures may contribute to the Common Good thus suggesting that good entrepreneurship requires a focus on: 1. Good Goods. The primary way an entrepreneurial venture can contribute to the Common Good is by bringing into existence new products and services which are inherently good and which enrich lives and minimize any unintended harms. This can include what we call the “entrepreneurship of the mundane”, that is, the manufacture of the nuts and bolts and basic necessities of life as well as the creation of life saving treatments. However, inclusion of good goods as a primary moral contribution of entrepreneurship must also require of the entrepreneur analysis of what goods are not good, and what aspects of even good goods should be redesigned or rethought in order to minimize unintended consequences. We find, in our discussions, that this is a much under appreciated dimension of the good of entrepreneurship. 2. Good Work. The second way an entrepreneurial venture can contribute to the Common Good is through the nature of the work that is carried out by the venture. This dimension has several aspects both internal and external to the entrepreneur: • The development of good character in the entrepreneur. This aspect of the good is derived from the subjective dimension of work, that is, just as how-we-work ends up changing the world, so working-on-the-world changes us. Most professionals spend the majority of their waking hours at work. As habits, character and wisdom are developed through experience and activity, for the entrepreneur, doing good work is an important opportunity to develop character. Society as a whole is better off for having good, successful entrepreneurial leaders who, through that calling, can become leaders of character. This dimension of the entrepreneurial good is widely unappreciated even by entrepreneurs themselves • Good relations with employees, customers and other stakeholders. Value creation and trade creates opportunities for the building of social relationships. The central question is “Are you in good relation with those with whom you create value?’ Do your employees have opportunity to develop as people? 3. Good Wealth. The third way the good entrepreneur can contribute to the Common Good is through the creation of good wealth. Good wealth requires a balance of reward for labor/ creativity with the provision of a living wage to all. Good wealth is often captured by individual action but has social strings attached. From the CST perspective the creation of good wealth implies a particular solidarity with the poor. One way to contribute to the common good is to donate altruistically to those in need. But even here, altruism is only one of a number of possible strategies. Good entrepreneurs may also contribute by donating their time or their particular skills. Indeed, since the donation of time and work often requires physical interaction with those in need, it often generates a solidarity of far greater integrity. Finally, it must be emphasized that altruism, for the entrepreneur, is always dependent, indeed subsequent to the creation of good wealth in the first place. Literature cited Alvord, Sarah, David L. Brown, and Christine W. Letts, 2004. “Social Entrepreneurship and Societal Transformation: An Exploratory Study,” The Journal of Applied Behavioral Science. 40:260. Benedict XVI, Caritas et veritate,   Boschee, Jerr. 1998 “What does it take to be a social entrepreneur?” National Centre for Social Entrepreneurs (www.socialentrepreneurs.org/whatdoes/html), 5pp.   Cannon, Carl. 2000. “Charity for profit: how the new social entrepreneurs are creating good by sharing wealth” National Journal, June 16: 1898-1904.   Christie, Michael and Benson Honig. 2006. “Social entrepreneurship: New research findings.” Journal of World Business. 41: 1-5.   Dees, Gregory, J., 1998. “The Meaning of ‘Social Entrepreneurship,’” Original Draft: 10/3.   Drucker, P.F. 1985. Innovation and Entrepreneurship. New York: Harper & Row.   Fowler, Alan. “NGDOs as a moment in history: beyond aid to social entrepreneurship or civic innovation?” Third World Quarterly, 21(4): 637-654.   Gregg, S. and G. Preece: 1999, Christianity and Entrepreneurship (The Centre for Independent Studies Limited, St. Leonards, NSW, Australia).   Hibbert, Sally A., Gillian Hogg and Theresa Quinn. “Consumer response to social entrepreneurship: The case of the Big Issue in Scotland.” International Journal of Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Marketing. 7(3): 288-301.   Johnson, Sherrill, 2000. “Literature Review on Social Entrepreneurship,” Canadian Center for social Entrepreneurship. (http://www.bus.ualberta.ca/ccse/Publications/).   John Paul II, Pope.: 1992 Laborem Exercens (On Human Work): 1981, in D. J. O’Brien and T. A. Shannon, (eds.), Catholic Social Thought (Orbis Books, Maryknoll, NY).   John Paul II, Pope.: 1992 Sollicitudo Rei Socialis (On Social Concern): 1987 in D. J. O’Brien and T. A. Shannon, (eds.), Catholic Social Thought (Orbis Books, Maryknoll, NY).   Kennedy, R., G, Atkinson, and M. Naughton, (eds.): 1994, Dignity of Work: John Paul II Speaks To Managers and Workers (University Press of America, Lanham, Maryland).   Mair, Johanna and Ernesto Noboa, 2003. “Social Entrepreneurship: How Intentions to Create a Social Enterprise get Formed,” IESE Business School.   Mair, Johanna and Ignasi Marti, 2006. “Social entrepreneurship research: A source of explanation, prediction, and delight,” Journal of World Business. 41: 36-44.   Melé, D.:2001, ‘A Challenge for Business Enterprises: Introducing the Primacy of the Subjective Meaning of Work in Work Organization’, (http://www.stthomas.edu/cathstudies/cst/mgmt/le/papers/mele.htm) Conclusions We have argued that, while there is great promise in the contemporary social entrepreneurship movement, there are also a number of important dangers. We propose that, if we confront rather than acquiesce to these dangers, we can use the perspective of Catholic Social Teaching to broaden the scope of entrepreneurial ventures that we study, to enrich the moral dimension of entrepreneurial strategy and to deepen the teaching of entrepreneurship as a whole. We recommend the following to move toward these contributions: • Incorporate social entrepreneurship into entrepreneurship in a way that enhances the three goods of entrepreneurship. Specifically we propose replacing the questions “What is social entrepreneurship?” with the questions “What does it mean to be a Good entrepreneur?” From this perspective we can then apply what we have called the three goods of entrepreneurship as a means of supplying critical challenge and inspiration to all forms of entrepreneurship such that the true moral dimension of this critical force in our lives comes into fruition. • Encourage research within the entrepreneurship discipline that addresses traditional social entrepreneurial issues such as micro lending, fair trade products, etc. • Develop bridge courses such as Theo/Cath 306 which help students understand and experience the meaning of the good entrepreneur as well as connect students to the spiritual and moral principles of a good entrepreneur. • Expose entrepreneurship students to so-called social entrepreneurs as well so-called conventional good entrepreneurs so they can see the spectrum of entrepreneurial activities. © File copyright Colin Purrington. You may use for making your poster, of course, but please do not plagiarize, adapt, or put on your own site. Also, do not upload this file, even if modified, to third-party file-sharing sites such as doctoc.com. If you have insatiable need to post a template onto your own site, search the internet for a different template to steal. File downloaded from http://colinpurrington.com/tips/ academic/posterdesign. Acknowledgments I am indebted to Michael Naughton and Laura Dunham for their reflections and thoughts on this paper.
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Role of International Social Work organizations We are in a global context where the social work profession  has got more organized through the establishment of  international organizations. Countries that are new to the  profession of social work would need support of the  international associations like IASSW. The International Association of Schools of Social Work  (IASSW) is an organization of more than five hundred  schools of social work, regional associations of social work  education and affiliate organizations working towards  strengthening social work education globally. The IASSW  along with its partner associations (IFSW and ICSW) was  established in 1928. It provides various forums for  interactions and capacity building on social work education  across countries and continents through bi-annual world  conferences; an online social dialogue magazine; funding  for international projects; capacity building of faculty; and  interactive social media sites (http://iassw-aiets.net). 03/18/2019
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Critical needs for cloud DC networks 1. Tenant virtualization – – 2. Traffic isolation, prioritization and rate limiting Overlapping IP addressing, along with IPv6 support Speed up configuration to allow reduced time to revenue: – – 3. Automatically create required network configs for new tenants Transparently bridging a L2 network will help reduce time Hybrid clouds with bursting – – Adding computational capacity (in the form of new VMs) as needed Lossless live migration Host 1 VM VM A1 A1 VM B1 VM C1 Hypervisor VLAN-101-x Switch-1 Switch-1 VLAN-101-x VLAN-101-x VLAN-101-x VLAN-101-x Switch-1 Switch-1 VLAN-101-x VLAN-101-x Switch-3 Switch-3 Switch-2 VLAN-101-x Switch-2 Switch-3 Switch-3 VLAN-101-x VLAN-101-x VLAN-101-x VLAN-101-x WAN
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Part 1: Background This analysis is primarily an exploration of the uses for Joint Couplers in COSMOSMotion An explanation of Joint Couplers: Joint couplers allow the motion of a revolute, cylindrical, or translational joint to be coupled to the motion of another revolute, cylindrical or translational joint. The two coupled joints may be of the same or different types; for example, a revolute joint may be coupled to a translational joint. The coupled motion may also be of the same or different type. For example, the rotary motion of a revolute joint may be coupled to the rotary motion of a cylindrical joint, or the translational motion of a translational joint may be coupled to the rotary motion of a cylindrical joint. Coupler joints are used here to produce motion between objects of complex geometry where a simple mate will not suffice. In this case the objects are bevel gears
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Income Taxes  Entities  Separate tax return   Included on Income Tax Return Require only those businesses with nexus in a state to file an income tax return Unitary tax return    Companies not filing a federal consolidated tax return can become a unitary group Unitary tax return group includes all members meeting the unitary criteria—whether they have nexus or not States west of the Mississippi River (and Illinois) are unitary return states 12-26 McGraw-Hill Education Copyright © 2017 McGraw-Hill Education. All rights reserved. No reproduction or distribution without the prior written consent of McGraw-Hill Education.
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For instance, in the USA the Council on Social Work Education  (CSWE) is a nonprofit national association representing more than  2,500 individual members, as well as graduate and undergraduate  programs of professional social work education. Founded in 1952,  this partnership of educational and professional institutions, social  welfare agencies, and private citizens is recognized by the Council  for Higher Education Accreditation as the sole accrediting agency for  social work education in this country (http://www.cswe.org/).   The Australian Association of Social Workers (AASW) accredits  professional social work courses on the basis of the Australian Social  Work Education and Accreditation Standards 2012 (ASWEAS)  (https://www.aasw.asn.au/careers-study/education-standardsaccreditation accessed on 07-06-2015).  AASW is a member of the  Asian Pacific Association of Social Work Education (APASWE).  03/18/2019
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4) Hermitian (or self-adjoint) operators: As we’ll see, these operators play a special role in QM (e.g., they correspond to physical observables, and have the property that their eigenvalues are real.) We will discuss them in much more detail later. 5) Anti-hermitian: 6) Unitary operators: Key feature: Unitary operators preserve the inner product i.e., So if two vectors are orthogonal, their transforms remain orthogonal. In fact, different orthonormal bases are related via unitary transformations Intuitively, suppose you have an orthonormal set of vectors. A unitary operator is somewhat analogous to rotating the entire set of vectors without changing their lengths or inner product. This is especially relevant when we want to switch from one set of basis vectors to another, as we now describe.
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Copyright Law in Higher Education  The Major Federal Statute governing copyrights is the Copyright Act of 1976: “ Initial ownership. Copyright in a work protected under this title [17 USCS Sects. 101 et seq.] vests initially in the author or authors of the work. The authors of a joint work are co-owners of copyright in the work” (Sec. 201(a)).  The Work for Hire Rule: “In the case of a work made for hire, the employer or other person for whom the work was prepared is considered the author for purposes of this title [17 USCS Sects. 101 et seq.], and, unless the parties have expressly agreed otherwise in a written instrument signed by them, owns all of the rights comprised in the copyright” (Sec. 201(b)). Carrie J. White, 2011
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bond 1.00% 0.99% 0.95% 0.89% 0.81% 0.71% 0.59% 0.45% 0.31% 0.16% 0.00% s&p500 0.00% 0.16% 0.31% 0.45% 0.59% 0.71% 0.81% 0.89% 0.95% 0.99% 1.00% 100.080 100.750 100.000 100.280 100.692 100.025 100.091 100.081 100.081 109.817 109.100 109.240 100.110 100.617 100.000 100.264 100.582 100.004 100.069 100.058 100.057 108.012 108.530 108.577 100.141 100.452 100.000 100.217 100.495 100.000 100.066 100.038 100.040 106.049 107.784 107.718 100.157 100.276 100.000 100.137 100.467 100.021 100.093 100.021 100.040 104.041 106.995 106.790 100.146 100.143 100.000 100.051 100.607 100.087 100.162 100.027 100.082 102.318 106.548 106.179 100.131 100.151 100.000 100.079 101.156 100.242 100.288 100.120 100.210 101.614 107.355 106.789 100.170 100.359 100.000 100.370 102.251 100.462 100.425 100.338 100.415 103.003 110.991 110.180 100.263 100.665 100.000 100.559 103.114 100.517 100.396 100.477 100.496 106.862 119.270 118.149 100.400 100.834 100.088 100.000 102.362 100.471 100.434 100.517 100.467 111.456 135.055 133.594 101.346 101.361 101.198 100.000 101.509 101.255 101.536 101.334 101.324 114.216 170.918 170.345 100.402 100.427 100.310 100.000 100.405 100.132 100.288 100.150 100.296 107.440 142.314 125.169 BEKK DIAGONAL - VT BEKK SCALAR BEKK SCALAR - VT DCC-ASY-GEN DCC-ASYMMETRIC DCC-GENERALIZED DCC-IMA DCC-MR DCC-RANK FIXED (all sample) OGARCH 1 OGARCH 2 Average 100.159 100.403 100.000 100.033 101.093 100.147 100.204 100.142 100.174 106.648 120.267 118.258 Table 157: sample variance of minimum variance portfolios subject to a required return of 1 (sample: 1001-end) 39
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