Flow Represent each person or group as Model a bubble. Create proposal Prototype Proposal Stor e old docs Diagram the relevant interactions between people. Indicate communication Annotate with responsibilities (and potential Filing Patent breakdowns) Cabinet/ Investigator Project Manager • Schedules/Calls Brainstorming Meetings • Organizes Project Teams • Keeps Idea Capture Forms (ICF)  easy to lose • Makes sure ICF are entered into Active Project  not always entered • Makes sure inventors enter ideas into Lab Notebook  not always happening • Investigates inventorship  difficult to Physical track ideas from brainstorming Repository session without ICF Search • Investigate due diligence/first to old docs invent • Investigate IP landscape/prior art Add handwritten entries & sketches Cut & paste doc printouts Doc Printouts RadTech Inventor Independent Innovator • Works on unsanctioned (independent) projects • Sketches concepts • Shares research with coworkers • Maintains Lab Notebook  not diligently maintained CS 321 Lesson Five Data Analysis Page 4 Sanctioned Project Team Member • Performs ethnographic research/analysis • Brainstorms project ideas • Creates Idea Capture Forms (ICF) • Documents ideas in Lab Notebook not always happening • Leads small brainstorm group in creating idea presentation (PPT) • Leads research project and interaction with Illustratio arrows. n Draftsperson RadTech Lab Notebook Submit disclosur e Collaborat e on claims Patent Administrator • Interacts with draftsperson to create professional illustrations • Gathers supporting materials (figures) • Keeps up with patent status in IP docket • Distribute new Lab Notebooks • Store old Lab Notebooks  doesn’t always happen • Searches IP docket for patent ID • Retrieves hard copy material from storage Maintains lab notebooks Access approved forms Invention Disclosur e Website (IDW) Attach file to disclosure IP Docket Provision al Patent Applicati on US Patent & Trademark Office Final Patent Application Handles office actions Patent Attorney • Writes/expands patent claims  Poor claims could allow another company to infringe on patents • Writes/files provisional patent applications • Understands invention (idea sheets, ICF) • Deals with office actions • Handles patent disputes Discuss office actions Monitor disclosures IDW Review Teams Treatment File Sketc h • Intellectual Property Strategic Teams (IPST) • One for each Special Business Unit (SBU) and one to overseeing team to approve or reject all disclosures • Decide which to pursue • Review patent applications  backlogged 3-4 years • Sends “office actions” • Published applications after 18 months  Outsource work whenExterna overloaded l Lawyer Draft Patent s Application Discuss invention details, edit patent application Patent Creation Assistant • Collaborates with legal team on patent application • Maintains Lab Notebook  not diligently maintained • Keeps Idea Capture Forms (ICF)  requires lots of experience/know-how • Gathers invention documentation for meeting with legal (Lab Notebook entries, email, sketches, spiral notebook entries)
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Copyright vs. Patent Copyright: Protect expression of an implementation of an idea     Copyright protects result of art, literature, written scholarship Creative work: Story, photograph, music, drawing “original works of authorship fixed in any tangible medium of expression,… from which they can be perceived, reproduced, or otherwise communicated, either directly or with the aid of a machine or device” – U.S. copyright law Protects an individual’s right to make a living Allows author the exclusive right to sell copies of the expression Patent: Patent protects results of science, technology, engineering       Excludes: laws of nature and mental processes: 1+1=2 Protects the device or process for carrying out an idea Patent goes to the person who first invented the idea – not the first patent applicant Patent infringement applies even if idea is produced independently Cannot promote an obvious use: cardboard as a book mark Owner of patent is author, unless employee’s job duties included inventing the product.
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DATA CONVERSION FUNCTIONS   These functions convert expression to another data type If the expression cannot be converted an exception error will result Function Description CSng(expression) Converts expression to a Single data type CDbl(expression) Converts expression to a Single data type CDec(expression) Converts expression to a Single data type CInt(expression) Converts expression to a Single data type CStr(expression) Converts expression to a Single data type CBool(expression) Converts expression to a Single data type CDate(expression) Converts expression to a Single data type CType(expression, TypeName) Converts expression to the type specified in TypeName Chapter 1, Slide Introduction to Visual 17 Basic Starting Out with Visual Basic Slide 3rd17 Edition
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Copyright vs. Patent Infringement Copyright: U.S. No Electronic Theft Act, 1997: Criminal offense to reproduce or distribute copyright works (even without charge): software/digital recordings  Copyright may choose to pursue only sufficiently large court cases  The copyright law: When you buy a CD, you are buying the right to use the CD.  Use: Play it, lend it, give it or sell it (single copy).  This is not true for a ‘license’ which can be specified as a lease agreement  Lasts for 70 years beyond author’s death or 95 years after date of publication for company/organization Patent: Patent holder must oppose all infringement  Patent infringement defense can include any of the following:  No infringement: Ideas are sufficiently different  Patent is invalid: Prior infringement was not opposed  Invention is not novel: Idea is not worthy of patent  Infringer invented object first: Infringer should be patent-holder
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1040_Get_Policy_Number DialogModule™ Digits Entering from 1010 Confirm PH Prompts Type Initial Condition Name Wording IF policy holder 10400 Please say your policy number. IF agent 10401 Please say the policy number. 10402 Sorry, I didn’t hear you. Please say the policy number one character at a time. For example, ‘one two three four five six seven.’ 10404 Sorry, I still didn’t hear you. Please say the policy number one character at a time. You can also say ‘more information.’ 10406 Please say the policy number one character at a time. For example, ‘one two three four five six seven.’ 10408 Please say the policy number one character at a time. You can also say ‘more information.’ IF policy holder 10410 The policy number can be found on your annual benefit statement or on any premium notice you may have received. When you say the policy number, be sure to say it one character at a time. For example, if the numbers 5 and 2 appear next to each say, say “five two” and not “fifty-two.” IF agent 10411 The policy number can be found on annual benefit statements or on any premium notice the policyholder may have received. When you say the policy number, be sure to say it one character at a time. For example, if the numbers 5 and 2 appear next to each say, say “five two” and not “fifty-two.” Timeout 1 Timeout 2 Always Retry 1 Retry 2 More information Option Vocabulary DTMF Digits <...> Confirmation Prompts Action Confirm. Go to: 1050 Thanks and Wait Always Option Name Wording Digits Default confirmation, as handled by DialogModule™ Module Settings Default (Slide from Jon Bloom) Result “I think you said <…>, is that correct?”
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Not All 20 Point Fonts Are Equal 20  A - Can You Read B - Can You Read C - Can You Read D - Can You Read E - Can You Read F - Can You Read G - Can You Read H - Can You Read I - Can You Read 16  J - Can You Read K - Can You Read L - Can You Read M - Can You Read N - Can You Read O - Can You Read P - Can You Read Q - Can You Read R - Can You Read 14  J - Can You Read K - Can You Read L - Can You Read M - Can You Read O - Can You Read P - Can You Read Q - Can You Read R - Can You Read 12  J - Can You Read K - Can You Read L - Can You Read M - Can You Read N - Can You Read O - Can You Read P - Can You Read Q - Can You Read R - Can You Read My Students Tell Me That They Like The Readability Of Ariel Font I never use fonts smaller than 20 point for lecture.
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Important Legal Information for Adolescents and Parents According to Iowa law, a minor (an individual younger than 18 years) may seek medical care for the following without the permission or knowledge of his parents: • Substance abuse treatment; • Sexually Transmitted Infection(STI) testing and treatment; • HIV testing – if test is positive, Iowa law requires parent notification; • Contraceptive care and counseling, including emergency contraception; and Even though teenagers young • Blood donation if 17and years of age or adults can receive these treatments older. without their parent’s knowledge, it is important to remember parents are a key part of all aspects of your life. We encourage parents and teens to be open and honest with each other when it comes to health care decisions. It is important for teens to know that if they are covered by their parents’ medical insurance and want it to cover their treatment, they will need to consent to their medical records being shared – possibly even with parents. A minor may also consent for evaluation and treatment in a medical emergency or following a sexual assault. However, treatment information can not be kept confidential from parents. Bill of Rights for Teens and Young Adults • The things you tell us in confidence will be kept private. • We will speak and write respectfully about your teen and family. • We will honor your privacy. YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO: Emotional Support • Care that respects your teen’s growth and development. • We will consider all of your teen’s interests and needs, not just those related to illness or disability. Respect and Personal Dignity • You are important. We want to get to know you. • We will tell you who we are, and we will call you by your name. We will take time to listen to you. • We will honor your privacy. Care that Supports You and Your Family • All teens are different. We want to learn what is important to you and your family. Information You Can Understand • We will explain things to you. We will speak in ways you can understand. You can ask about what is happening to you and why. Care that Respects Your Need to Grow and Learn • We will consider all your interests and needs, not just those related to your illness or disability. Make Choices and Decisions • Your ideas and feelings about how you want to be cared for are important. • You can tell us how we can help you feel more comfortable. • You can tell us how you want to take part in your care. • You can make choices whenever possible like when and where you YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO: receive your treatments. Bill of Rights for Parents Respect and Personal Dignity • You and your teen will be treated with courtesy and respect. Make Decisions About Your Teen’s Care • We will work in partnership with you and your teen to make decisions about his care. • You can ask for a second opinion from another healthcare provider. Family Responsibilities YOU HAVE THE RESPONSIBILITY TO: Provide Information • You have important information about your teen’s health. We need to know about symptoms, treatments, medicines, and other illnesses. • You should tell us what you want for your child. It is important for you to tell us how you want to take part in your teen’s care. • You should tell us if you don’t understand something about your teen’s care. • If you are not satisfied with your teen’s care, please tell us. Provide Appropriate Care • You and the other members of the health care team work together to plan your teen’s care. • You are responsible for doing the things you agreed to do in this plan
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9.8 public, protected and private Inheritance Base class member access specifier Type of inheritance public inheritance protected inheritance private inheritance public in derived class. Can be accessed directly by any non-static member functions, friend functions and nonmember functions. protected in derived class. Can be accessed directly by all non-static member functions and friend functions. private in derived class. Can be accessed directly by all non-static member functions and friend functions. protected in derived class. Can be accessed directly by all Protected non-static member functions and friend functions. protected in derived class. Can be accessed directly by all non-static member functions and friend functions. private in derived class. Can be accessed directly by all non-static member functions and friend functions. Hidden in derived class. Can be accessed by non-static member functions and friend functions through public or protected member functions of the base class. Hidden in derived class. Can be accessed by non-static member functions and friend functions through public or protected member functions of the base class. Public Private Hidden in derived class. Can be accessed by non-static member functions and friend functions through public or protected member functions of the base class.  2003 Prentice Hall, Inc. All rights reserved. 83
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Legal Tools for Protecting Intellectual Property Rights Protection Copyright Trademark Trade secret Patent Issues > Intellectual Property Rights Description Protects the words, music, and other expressions for the life of the copyright holder + 70 years. The fair use doctrine describes when and how copyrighted material can be legally used. The Digital Millennium Copyright Act provides global copyright protection. Protects a unique symbol or word used by a business to identify a product or service. Protects secrets or proprietary information of individuals and organizations as long as the trade secret is adequately protected. Protects an invention by giving the patent holder a monopoly on the use of the invention for 20 years after the patent application was submitted.
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Rules for expressions -> ; -> | = -> | < | > | <= | >= etc.
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A University of Michigan Education  What it is NOT!  NOT a “tech” degree intended to train you only for a specific, narrow job.  Not getting by with the minimum - but getting the most out of it.  Not easily obtained! Requires dedication, hard work, persistance, and willingness to learn.   University - introduction to the “universe” of ideas, diversity of cultures, fields of knowledge, and ways of knowing Levels of Learning - Necessities for Any Career         Ability to learn facts to facilitate consideration and discussion Ability to recognize facts / ideas stated in different ways Ability to associate facts / ideas drawn from different fields Ability to understand similarities among different facts / ideas Ability to understand differences among similar facts / ideas Ability to construct new ideas / explanations from facts / ideas Ability to think critically about ideas and form decisions The Love of Learning as a Journey, not as a Means to an End.  A necessity in an ever changing world (e.g., Flint & GM)  A key to a long and fruitful life
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Diagram the policies, procedures, rules, laws, authorities, traditions, customs, practices, preferences, attitudes, etc. that influence the Use bubbles to specify all Arrows work. Annotate the Cultural Model Technology/Industry Mo ve q uic kly to ke ep entities (not necessarily people) that influence the work. relevant attitudes of each entity. Your success depends on us, so we do things our way up w ith Move quickly on major projects te c Innovations Business Unit Prioritize the projects – we don’t have time/money/staff to do everything hn olo support collaborative effort in Innovations – keep using that method giWe es We want to make the same products for the same market We like provisional applications – they’re cheaper, less work, and buy us another year The inventions you make should work together and help us monopolize the market Competitors RadTech Legal Inventor i od go s e k h t t boo e pu ly not n o ab We he l t in as de rk wo s thi on indicate the influences that the entities have on each other, including policies, preferences, authority, etc. The amount that bubbles overlap is proportional to the extent to which an influence affects an entity. l wil • I want to find all possible solutions to any problem I’m presented with. You • We can’t risk data • The first idea that works is not necessarily the best one. being stored on • My RadTech Lab Notebook shouldn’t be filled with scribbles or half-baked ideas. individual hard drives • If I’m not confident in my idea, I don’t want to present it to someone to witness. • We don’t blame • I want to develop and document my idea as much as possible before getting a individual inventors witness in case the witness had the same idea before me Customer for problems with • I’m embarrassed about not getting a witness for everything in my RadTech Lab documentation s Notebook How do you use • I could be anywhere when an idea hits me our products? • Documenting is just to cover your tracks, the real magic happens in the invention process • Innovation is a collaborative process • I wish the monetary award for patenting inventions were bigger – a plaque and You should double-check the facts in the patent application that I write $1000 is not enough • If my idea allows us to do something nobody else is able to do, it should go in the I understand the customer’s needs Inventorship must be clear RadTach Lab Notebook It’s up to you to solve problems Document everything in your RadTech Lab Notebook • Lab Notebooks are great for documentation, but it takes time Give us something extra to sell Think outside the box – the patent should be as broad as possible • I tend not to be very good at keeping lab notes, but most people here don’t either • The RadTech Lab Notebook is sacrosanct, almost like folklore Is this a good idea? I’ll I understand the law and need all technical details of your invention • Creating documents is easier on the computer wait to document it until • Sharing ideas, viewing large documents, and searching for concepts by diagram is you tell me We need you to create the patent application – we don’t know how easier on paper • I want my data to be safe and time-stamped Here is allI have for this invention – you know what to do with it • If Legal writes something, I have to double-check the facts, so I’d rather write it I don’t know the status of my Invention Disclosure myself • I share information freely with mu colleagues; everyone in Innovations knows what the others are working on • I like having everything on my hard drive for instant local access You might steal my idea • After I submit an invention disclosure, the rest of the patent application is a “black box” M to ake fit s ou om r n et ee hin ds g Marketing CS 321 Lesson Five Data Analysis Page 5 External Collaborator
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11 9.3 Inheritances Base class member access specifier Type of inheritance public inheritance protected inheritance private inheritance public in derived class. Can be accessed directly by any non-static member functions, friend functions and nonmember functions. protected in derived class. Can be accessed directly by all non-static member functions and friend functions. private in derived class. Can be accessed directly by all non-static member functions and friend functions. protected in derived class. Can be accessed directly by all Protected non-static member functions and friend functions. protected in derived class. Can be accessed directly by all non-static member functions and friend functions. private in derived class. Can be accessed directly by all non-static member functions and friend functions. Hidden in derived class. Can be accessed by non-static member functions and friend functions through public or protected member functions of the base class. Hidden in derived class. Can be accessed by non-static member functions and friend functions through public or protected member functions of the base class. Public Private Hidden in derived class. Can be accessed by non-static member functions and friend functions through public or protected member functions of the base class.  2003 Prentice Hall, Inc. All rights reserved.
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