Current courses approved for Exchange Criteria expanded for Fall 1. Introduction to Criminal Justice 2. Introduction to Cultural Anthropology 3. Child Growth and Development 4. Intercultural Communication 5. Principles of Microeconomics 6. Principles of Macroeconomics 7. College Composition 8. Introduction to Human Geography 9. Physical Geology 10. United States History to 1877 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. United States History from 1865 Introduction to Statistics Introduction to Philosophy Introduction to American Government and Politics Introductory Psychology Introduction to Research Methods in Psychology Introduction to Research Methods in Psychology (With Lab) Introduction to Sociology Introduction to Research Methods
View full slide show




Works Cited: • (1) Martin, Anthony J. Introduction to the Study of Dinosaurs (2006). Page 10. Table 1.1 Summary of different major clade groups use to classify dinosaurs, general descriptions of anatomical characteristics for each group and genus examples. • (2) Martin, Anthony J. Introduction to the Study of Dinosaurs (2006). Page 266. • • • • • • • • • (3) Martin, Anthony J. Introduction to the Study of Dinosaurs (2006). Page 267. (4) Martin, Anthony J. Introduction to the Study of Dinosaurs (2006). Page10. (5) Martin, Anthony J. Introduction to the Study of Dinosaurs (2006). Page 258. (6) Martin, Anthony J. Introduction to the Study of Dinosaurs (2006). Page 257. (7) Martin, Anthony J. Introduction to the Study of Dinosaurs (2006). Page 125. (8) Martin, Anthony J. Introduction to the Study of Dinosaurs (2006). Page 260. (9) Martin, Anthony J. Introduction to the Study of Dinosaurs (2006). Page 259. (10) Martin, Anthony J. Introduction to the Study of Dinosaurs (2006). Page 268. Farlow, James O., Surman, Brett M. K. Walters, Robert F. The Complete Dinosaur (1999) . Page 228. Currie, P.J. Tanke, D.H. “Head-Biting Behavior in Theropod Dinosaurs: Paleopathological Evidence” 1998 GAIA N 15 167-184. Bakker Robert T. “Brontosaur Killers: Late Jurassic Allosaurids As Saber-tooth Cat Analogues” 1998 GAIA N 15 145-158. • •
View full slide show




The normal process of starting a thesis is to begin with the Introduction section. This may take a day or two to write the Introduction as a first draft. Let’s say it takes a day. If you have waited until you got all your research is “done” prior to starting writing, then the next day you are likely to begin your day by first re-opening the Introduction and editing it, planning afterwards to move on to the next section. The next day you are likely to start the same way. This sequential process leads to a highly polished Introduction and slow progress on the rest. Moreover, by the time you write your conclusions, which will probably be done hastily the day you plan to hand out your thesis/dissertation to your committee, your introduction needs further work because of the changing scope/objectives that typically occurs during the course of the research and thesis/dissertation writing. Avoid wasting time and having to delete polished text, by writing your Introduction LAST, or at least write up only the previous-work sections. If you have been keeping up with the Materials and Methods section, then begin by writing your results and discussion section(s). Along the way think about revising your objectives so that they are consistent with your results and conclusions. Then write the Introduction and include the purpose of your work to provide the reader with the context and background of the work, methods, and analyses you use (the purpose is not as obvious to everyone else).
View full slide show




Introductions • • • • Your introduction should orient your reader. In a sense, you are giving an orientation with your introduction. Imagine your reader is visiting some aspect of your life. Keep in mind the diversity of your potential readers. Do not be gimmicky or heavy-handed with your attempt to get your readers’ attention. The tone of your introduction should not be very different from the tone of your essay. Your introduction should not simply summarize the essay. The introduction should be slightly broader than the body of the essay. Be careful not to make the introduction too broad. Your introduction should introduce your essay and your essay only.
View full slide show




References  J. Lafferty, A. McCallum, and F. Pereira. Conditional random fields:       Probabilistic models for segmenting and labeling sequence data. In Proc. ICML01, 2001. Charles Elkan, “Log-linear Models and Conditional Random Field,” Notes for a tutorial at CIKM, 2008. Charles Sutton and Andrew McCallum, “An Introduction to Conditional Random Fields for Relational Learning,” MIT Press, 2006 Slides: An Introduction to Conditional Random Field, Ching-Chun Hsiao Hanna M. Wallach , Conditional Random Fields: An Introduction, 2004 Sutton, Charles, and Andrew McCallum. An introduction to conditional random fields for relational learning. Introduction to statistical relational learning. MIT Press, 2006. Sutton, Charles, and Andrew McCallum. "An introduction to conditional random fields." arXiv preprint arXiv:1011.4088 (2010).  B. Majoros, Conditional Random Fields, for eukaryotic gene prediction
View full slide show




Subjects Sciences Tutoring Subjects Physics*†, Mechanics, Classical Electromagnetism, Optics, Nuclear, Physics, Quantum Mechanics†, Acoustics, General Relativity, Biology*†, General Biology*, Biochemistry, Molecular & Cell Biology†, Microbiology†, Human Anatomy & Physiology†, Genetics, Zoology, Botany, Ecology, Evolution, Chemistry, General Chemistry I and II, Organic Chemistry I and II, Biochemistry†, Inorganic Chemistry†, Physical Chemistry†, Analytical Chemistry†, Earth Science, Geology, Astronomy† General Humanities & Social Sciences*† US Government, US History, Anthropology, Environmental Studies, General Humanities, Government/Not for Profit, Communications, Introduction to Sociology, Introduction to Psychology, Introduction to Philosophy, World History, Ethics, Introduction to Literature, Introduction to Criminal Justice, Criminology, Ethics in CJ, Criminal Law, Criminal Investigation
View full slide show




BUSINESS Bicycle Maintenance Certificate of Completion (Noncredit) 1. BCYCLE NC 901 Bicycle Maintenance Level 1 2. BCYCLE NC 902 Bicycle Maintenance Level 2 Business Essentials Level 1 Certificate of Completion (Noncredit) 1. BUS NC 901 Introduction to Business Basic 2. BUS NC 902 Introduction to Business Mindset Customer Service Certificate of Completion (Noncredit) 1. BUS NC 911 Customer Service Level 1 2. BUS NC 912 Customer Service Level 2 CSIS Basic Computer Operations Certificate of Completion  1. OCC E00, Basic Computer Training 2. OCC E20: Using the Internet Safely  ECE Introduction to Early Care & Education Certificate of Completion (Noncredit) 1. ECE NC 901 Introduction to Early Care & Education   2. ECE NC 902 Culturally Relevant Curriculum 3. ECE NC 903 Early Care Licensing & Workforce Readiness HEALTH SCIENCES & KINESIOLOGY Rehabilitation Therapy Aide Certificate of Completion (Noncredit) 1. HEALTH NC 900 Introduction to the Career of a Rehabilitation Aide 2. HEALTH NC 902 Clinical Practice for a Rehabilitation Aide 3. HEALTH NC 904 Kinesiology for a Rehabilitation Therapy Aide
View full slide show




Course Curriculum          What is computer? What is information? Introduction to History of Computing. Introduction to Computer Ethics. Encryption and Forensics. Part I Steganography Computer examination process. MD5 algorithm, fingerprints and hashes. Application to Computer Forensics. Introduction to Linux OS and Introduction to FTimes system baselining and evidence collection tool. Encryption and Forensics. Part II: Introduction to Public Key Cryptology and Pretty Good Privacy (PGP) encryption tool. Cyber Terrorism
View full slide show




1. Oral Communication ✓ assessed in COM2206 – Interpersonal Communication ✓ assessed in COM2211 – Effective Public Speaking 2. Written Communication ✓ assessed in ENG1101 – English Composition I 3. Computer Literacy ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ assessed in BIS1120 – Introduction to Software Applications assessed in MET1131 – Personal Computer Applications for Engineering Technology assessed in AUT1102 – Introduction to Automotive Service assessed in ALH1101 – Introduction to Healthcare Delivery 4. Cultural Diversity and Global Citizenship ✓ assessed in SOC1101 – Introduction to Sociology ✓ assessed in PSY1100 – General Psychology ✓ assessed in HUM1125 – Introduction to the Humanities 5. Information Literacy ✓ must be assessed within individual programs 6. Critical Thinking* ✓ must be assessed within individual programs (*modifications will be made to the Critical Thinking rubric currently found in the Repository!)
View full slide show




Introduction Brief introduction given here. Make sure that your advisor sees this poster before printing it. Your introduction should be at least one paragraph long. Remember to give the big picture first (why do we care about this study) and end with the details of the study you are presenting. You should include the hypothesis for your study towards the end of the introduction. Feel free to add pictures and diagrams as you see fit.
View full slide show




Displacement of current credit educational programming  Fall 2013 – Displaced courses to be offered online – ACC 110 BASIC ACCOUNTING PROCEDURES – MAT 120 GENERAL EDUCATION STATISTICS – MAT 150 ELEMENTS OF MATHEMATICS – MAT 161 COLLEGE ALGEBRA – MCC 101 THE COLLEGE EXPERIENCE – PHI 151 INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY – PHI 261 RELIGIONS OF THE WORLD – PLT 251 INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS – SOC 151 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY – CJS 101 INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL JUSTICE – CJS 120 JUVENILE DELINQUENCY – HCE 110 MEDICATION MATH – PSY 151 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY – PSY 251 CHILD PSYCHOLOGY – PSY 265 SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY  Reduces the number of displaced sections by 35
View full slide show




Transfer/Career Curriculum Career Option Transfer Option Year 1, Fall Semester Year 1, Fall Semester Computer Elective Computer Elective English Composition I English Composition I Introduction to American Law Introduction to American Law Introduction to Paralegalism Introduction to Paralegalism Practical Logic Practical Logic
View full slide show




London Academic Classes Class titles and numbers from Citrus College Catalog KENNETH GUTTMAN – CITRUS COLLEGE DEANNA DAVIS – COLLEGE OF THE CANYONS Hist 120 - British Life and Culture (CSU/UC) REQUIRED Psychology 101 Introduction to Psychology (CSU/UC) Psychology 225 Psychology of Human Sexuality (CSU/UC) Sociology 202 Contemporary Social Problems (CSU/UC) Engl 252 – Introduction to English Literature 19th and 20th centuries (CSU/UC) Engl 272 – Introduction to World Literature 1600’s through 20th century (CSU/UC) Engl 291 – Film as Literature (CSU/UC) Engl 294 – Introduction to Shakespeare (CSU/UC) JAMES URBANOVICH – CRAFTON HILLS COLLEGE Speech 101 (3 unitsGrade Only) Public Address (CSU/UC) Speech 103 Argumentation and Debate (CSU/UC) Communications 100 Mass Media and Society (CSU/UC) Communications 200 Visual Communications (CSU/UC) Distance Education/Online Courses Participants can choose ONE online course to meet their full-time 12 unit requirement. PLEASE NOTE: These courses are taught for 16 full weeks. They begin on August 27 and end December 14.
View full slide show




Introductions • Your introduction will be the first paragraph of your essay. • The thesis should appear at the end of the introduction. • Do not begin your introduction with a question. • Do not begin your introduction with a scope greater than the geographical and historical scope of your essay. Never write, “Since the beginning of time” or “Throughout history.”
View full slide show




 REFERENCES 1. E.F. Codd, "A Relational Model of Data for Large Shared Data Banks", Comm. ACM 13 (6), June 1970, pp. 377-387. The original paper introducing the relational data model. E.F. Codd, "Normalized Data Base Structure: A Brief Tutorial", ACM SIGFIDET Workshop on Data Description, Access, and Control, Nov. 11-12, 1971, San Diego, California, E.F. Codd and A.L. Dean (eds.). An early tutorial on the relational model and normalization. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 117 E.F. Codd, "Further Normalization of the Data Base Relational Model", R. Rustin (ed.), Data Base Systems (Courant Computer Science Symposia 6), Prentice-Hall, 1972. Also IBM Research Report RJ909. The first formal treatment of second and third normal forms. C.J. Date, An Introduction to Database Systems (third edition), Addison-Wesley, 1981. An excellent introduction to database systems, with emphasis on the relational. R. Fagin, "Multivalued Dependencies and a New Normal Form for Relational Databases", ACM Transactions on Database Systems 2 (3), Sept. 1977. Also IBM Research Report RJ1812. The introduction of fourth normal form. R. Fagin, "Normal Forms and Relational Database Operators", ACM SIGMOD International Conference on Management of Data, May 31-June 1, 1979, Boston, Mass. Also IBM Research Report RJ2471, Feb. 1979. The introduction of fifth normal form. W. Kent, "A Primer of Normal Forms", IBM Technical Report TR02.600, Dec. 1973. An early, formal tutorial on first, second, and third normal forms. T.-W. Ling, F.W. Tompa, and T. Kameda, "An Improved Third Normal Form for Relational Databases", ACM Transactions on Database Systems, 6(2), June 1981, 329-346. One of the first treatments of inter-relational dependencies.
View full slide show




Section headings should be descriptive and parallel Non-Parallel Non-Descriptive Introduction Introduction Background Background Marx MarxGenerators Generators Line Pulse Line Pulse Beam BeamGeneration Generation Transporting TransportingBeam Beam Pellets Pellets Results Results Conclusions Conclusions Parallel Descriptive Introduction Introduction Past PastDesigns Designsfor forParticle ParticleBeam BeamFusion Fusion New NewDesign Designfor forParticle ParticleBeam BeamFusion Fusion Charging Marx Generators Charging Marx Generators Forming FormingLine LinePulse Pulse Generating GeneratingParticle ParticleBeam Beam Transporting TransportingParticle ParticleBeam Beam Irradiating IrradiatingDeuterium-Tritium Deuterium-TritiumPellets Pellets Results Resultsof ofNew NewDesign Design Conclusions Conclusionsand andRecommendations Recommendations
View full slide show




Course Introduction • IT – Introduction to information technology – Computer hardware, software, network – IT management • IS – Introduction to information systems – Information system components – Types of information systems • PC – personal computing – Advanced spreadsheet techniques in decision support. – Introduction to database and database application development – Internet techniques
View full slide show




The collection of data and the size of the data have been throughout an evolutionary process that covers four stages Engineer hard wired computer to extract information “ the introduction of telegraph” Data input by Computer operators “corporation and organizations logging corporate data” The introduction of the web “ the introduction of web.01 and web.02” The introduction of sensors “ internet of things” Explosion of data collection has been exponential, going from KB to TB
View full slide show




Week of - 9 July week 1 OC3522 Remote Sensing of the Mo: Organization, Introduction and Motivation Tu: A Brief History of Environmental Satellite Systems Atmosphere and Ocean Summer We: continued 2001 Th: Satellite Orbits Fr: LAB 1- Introduction to Satellite Imagery Week of - 20 August week 7 Week of - 16 July week 2 Mo: Atmospheric Sounding Solutions Mo: Tracking/Navigation Tu: The Retrieval Problem/Sounding Tu: Review of Basic Definitions EMR/ Radiative Transfer Systems We: Radiative Transfer for Remote Sensing We: Detection of Water Vapor Th: Special Solutions Th : Water Vapor Imagery Fr: Lab 2- Image Manipulation LAB 4 - Cloud Week ofFr: - 27 August week Classification 8 Week of - 23 July week 3 Mo: Detection of Atmospheric Constituents Mo: Introduction to Visible/Solar Tu: continued Applications We: Introduction to Microwave Radiative Transfer Scattering by Aerosols Th: Exam review Tu: Aerosol Applications Fr: (LAB PERIOD) EXAM II We: Scattering by Clouds/Applications Week of - 3 September week 9 Th: Ocean Color Mo: HOLIDAY Week of - 30 July week 4 Tu: Passive Microwave Applications - Ocean Mo: Color Applications We: MW Ocean II Tu: Land Surface Applications Th: MW Atmosphere We: Lidar and Applications Fr: LAB 5 - ICE Applications - ARC-VIEW Th: Examine review Week of 10 September week 10 Fr:- 6(LAB PERIOD) I Week of August weekEXAM 5 Mo: Active Microwave - Radar Equation Mo: IR Theory Tu: Altimeter-I Tu: SST - Theory and Applications We: Altimeter-II We: Clouds in the IR Th: Synthetic Aperture Radar-I Th: Multispectral Cloud Analysis Week of - 17 September week 11 Fr: LAB 3 - SST Analysis Mo: Synthetic Aperture Radar-II Week of - 13 August week 6 Tu: Scatterometer Mo: NO CLASS We: FUTURE Tu: ARC-VIEW INTRO Parsons Th : Exam Review / PAPER DUE We: Guest Lecture - CODAR Paduan Wed Sept. 26 8AM FINALS WEEK: EXAM III Th: NO CLASS
View full slide show




Chapter 21 - Standard Template Library (STL) Outline 21.1 Introduction to the Standard Template Library (STL) 21.1.1 Introduction to Containers 21.1.2 Introduction to Iterators 21.1.3 Introduction to Algorithms 21.2 Sequence Containers 21.2.1 vector Sequence Container 21.2.2 list Sequence Container 21.2.3 deque Sequence Container 21.3 Associative Containers 21.3.1 multiset Associative Container 21.3.2 set Associative Container 21.3.3 multimap Associative Container 21.3.4 map Associative Container 21.4 Container Adapters 21.4.1 stack Adapter 21.4.2 queue Adapter 21.4.3 priority_queue Adapter  2003 Prentice Hall, Inc. All rights reserved. 1
View full slide show




Training Module Preview • This module will provide: – – – – – A basic history of Project Management Introduction to key terms Introduction to key concepts Introduction to traditional methodologies Introduction to logical task sequence • This module is constructed as the first block in a building block approach Urban and Regional Studies Institute 3
View full slide show