Figure 4: Logic Model for the Quality Enhancement Plan Figure 6. Logic M odel for the Q uality Enhancement Plan Ra tionale Inputs Activities Outputs Outcome Why is this important? What are we doing now? What will we do? What products, events, & services will lead to program outcomes? What learning outcomes will be achieved? • Students must be C urriculum • Global learning content in general education (core) courses • Global learning content in selected academic majors representing each academic college • Collaboration with community resources with global focus to support course assignments • Study abroad program prepared to compete in a global market • Students must understand their role within an international community • Students need to be prepared to engage in increasingly diverse communities C o-Curricular • Global learning/engagement activities sponsored by student organizations • Freshman common read program • International learning community in residence hall Budget to support QEP activities • $1,153,233 budgeted over five year implementation period C urriculum • Incorporate global learning/engagement content/activities in general education (core) discipline courses • Conduct curriculum mapping for coursework in selected majors to enhance global learning/engagement C ampus Initiatives • Increase service learning opportunities within Study Abroad program • Coordinate student recognition and curriculum development activities with the Service Learning program C o-Curricular • Expand global learning/engagement activities sponsored by Student organizations • Increase international interactions C ommunity • Increase collaborative work with community organizations to support global learning/engagement activities • Increase collaborative work with international organizations to support global learning/engagement activities Curriculum E nhance ment • Number of general education (core) courses modified to include global learning/engagement activities • Number of courses in academic majors modified to include global learning/engagement activities • Number of students by college participating in global learning/engagement courses • Number and type of faculty participating in professional development activities and learning communities Co-Curricular • Number of student organizations sponsoring global learning/engagement activities • Number and demographics of students participating in global learning/engagement activities Community • Number of community organizations supporting global learning/engagement activities • Number of international organizations supporting global learning/engagement activities Knowledge • Students identify, describe, and explain global and intercultural conditions and interdependencies. • Students make informed critical assessments of global events, processes, trends and issues and convey the interconnectedness of political, economic and environmental systems. Skills • Students analyze, interpret, and evaluate global and intercultural issues via engagement strategies including the use of information technologies. • Students demonstrate an ability to communicate and interact effectively with members of other cultures. Attitude s • Students reflect upon and integrate global learning and engagement experiences. • Students recognize and appreciate cultural diversity and multiple world views.
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Nuclear Power Is… Safe Energy Source Mortality Rate (deaths per trillion kWh) Coal – global average 100,000 (41% of global electricity) Coal – China 170,000 (75% of China’s electricity) Coal – U.S. 10,000 (30% of U.S. electricity) Oil – global average 36,000 (33% of global energy, 4% of global electricity) Natural Gas – global avg. Biofuel/Biomass – global avg. 4,000 24,000 (22% of global electricity) (21% of global energy) Solar – global average 440 (<1% of global electricity) Wind – global average 150 (2% of global electricity) Hydro – global average Hydro – U.S. Nuclear – global average Nuclear – U.S. 1,400 5 90 0.1 (16% of global electricity) (6% of U.S. electricity) (10% of global electricity w/ Chernobyl & Fukushima) (20% of U.S. electricity) Sources –World Health Organization; CDC; 1970 – 2011 15
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Global health educational resources Refugee health resources HealthReach: multilingual and culturally appropriate health information materials for refugees and health providers. Refugee Health Technical Assistance Center: videos about health insurance & refugee basics (resettlement process and cultural profiles) US Committee for Refugees and Immigrants: multilingual health and nutrition information and healthy living toolkit, domestic violence, etc. Health Information Translations: Health information materials translated into multiple languages for immigrant and refugee families Ethnomed: Seattle based organization on cultural profiles and cross cultural health. Minnesota Department of Health: refugee resources, including a health guide for refugee families Canadian Paediatric Society Global Child Health Curriculum: See details in “online modules” section below Online courses, modules & videos Global Pediatric Education Consortium: outline of skills, procedures, and patient care knowledge that can be used to create local training materials worldwide, http://www.globalpediatrics.org/ Global Health Media Project videos (for health workers in resource-poor areas): http://globalhealthmedia.org/videos/ BU edX Global Health MOOCs—The Practitioner’s Guide to Global Health: Three multi-disciplinary online preparation courses that are interactive, case-based, evaluative, enable tracking for program directors, and are free of charge. (PI Gabrielle Jacquet) Part 1: The Big Picture (6-12 months in advance) Part 2: Preparation and On the Ground (1 week-3 months in advance) Part 3: Reflection (upon return) Coursera courses: https://www.coursera.org/course/globalhealthintro Canadian Paediatric Society Global Child Health Curriculum. Four 1-hour online modules: (1) Global Child Mortality; (2) Undernutrition; (3) Fever in the Returned Child Traveler and (4) Children and Youth New to Canada. Available free by request, http://www.cps.ca/en/curriculum University of Minnesota Global Pediatric Education Series (28 peer-reviewed recorded lectures on Global Child Health, associated with quiz questions & CME): http://www.globalhealth.umn.edu/education/online-global-health-course/ Consortium of Universities for Global Health (CUGH) modules & resources: http://www.cugh.org/resources/educational-modules Johns Hopkins School of Public Health open source modules: http://ocw.jhsph.edu/index.cfm/go/find.browse#topics/topicID/11/ SickKids Centre for Global Child Health Public Health Nutrition Course: http://learn.sickkidsglobal.ca/ Stanford International Women’s Rights course: http://www.internationalwomenshealth.org/about.html University of Pittsburgh free modules: http://www.pitt.edu/~super1/lecture/lec40331/001.htm Unite for Sight Global Health University USAID Modules: http://www.globalhealthlearning.org/ UW I-TECH Clinical Education modules: http://edgh.uw.edu/series/clinical-education-modules Refugee health module: http://ccirhken.ca/e-learning/?page_id=447 World Bank Group: http://www.worldbank.org/depweb/english/modules/index.html AAP Section of International Child Health (SOICH) International Child Health Competency-Based Objectives (2007): http://www2.aap.org/sections/ich/toolkit.htm
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GLOBAL HEALTH TRACK COMPONENTS Develop a Global Health Individualized Learning Plan Establish a relationship with a Global Health Faculty Mentor Participate in the Global Health Noon Conference Series (6 per year) Attend the Global Health Grand Rounds Series (annually) st Attend the Global Health Track monthly sessions (1 Wednesday of every month) Scholarly requirement: Lead a Global Health Track Residents As Instructors at Noon Session Prepare for and participate in an elective in a resource-limited setting* (Indian Health Service Corps, low resource local setting, or international) This experience includes completion of a pre-trip curriculum, maintenance of an on-site patient log, and debriefing and upon return. *Note: This is highly recommended but not required for track completion. We recognize that there are circumstances that could preclude participation in a global health elective (such as illness, safety concerns at the elective site, financial restrictions, etc). Per CHW policy, global health electives are only offered to residents who have enrolled in the Global Health Track as interns and are on track to complete Track requirements by graduation Rotate in the CHW HIV and International Adoption Clinics (when available) Community engagement: participate in service learning opportunities, including with partners such as the Pan African Community Association, the International Learning Center, & Journey House Community Center. Educational initiatives: opportunities include assisting with the Pediatric Residency global health curriculum, providing education for Global Health Pathway medical students, and engaging in Train the Trainer initiatives during global health electives National involvement: enroll as a member of the American Academy of Pediatrics Section on International Child Health; become engaged in national advocacy, educational, and other initiatives % Expected participation 100% 100% 100% (in person or by video) 100% (in person or by video) Minimum 50% 100% PL Year 1 (annual reassessment) 1, 2, 3 1, 2, 3 1, 2, 3 1, 2, 3 2 or 3 Optional 3 (or 4, for med-peds) Optional 1, 2, 3 (timing will vary) Optional 1, 2, 3 Optional 1, 2, 3 Optional 1, 2, 3
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Macroeconomics ⎮ Macroeconomics, in contrast, deals with the aggregate, or total economy; it looks at economic problems as they influence the whole of society. ⎮ Topics covered in macroeconomics include discussions of inflation, unemployment, business cycles, and economic growth. To put it simply, microeconomics looks at the trees while macroeconomics looks at the forest. ©2016 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. © technotr/Vetta/Getty Images, Inc. 24
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Macroeconomics vs. Microeconomics  Macroeconomics examines the aggregate behavior of the economy.  Macroeconomics examines how the actions of all the individuals and firms in the economy interact to produce a particular level of economic performance as a whole.  In macroeconomics, the behavior of the whole macroeconomy is, indeed, greater than the sum of individual actions and market outcomes.
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Questions • What might the future of macroeconomics bring? • How might the macroeconomics taught two decades from now be different from the macroeconomics taught today? • What have been the principal changes in the way macroeconomics is taught over the past twenty years? 17-2 Copyright © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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Generated MMABooksDataSet.Designer.cs (top) : tables, columns, constraints… //-----------------------------------------------------------------------------// // This code was generated by a tool. // Runtime Version:4.0.30319.42000 // // Changes to this file may cause incorrect behavior and will be lost if // the code is regenerated. Do not change it // //-----------------------------------------------------------------------------#pragma warning disable 1591 namespace ProductMaintenance { /// ///Represents a strongly typed in-memory cache of data. /// [global::System.Serializable()] [global::System.ComponentModel.DesignerCategoryAttribute("code")] [global::System.ComponentModel.ToolboxItem(true)] [global::System.Xml.Serialization.XmlSchemaProviderAttribute("GetTypedDataSetSchema")] [global::System.Xml.Serialization.XmlRootAttribute("MMABooksDataSet")] [global::System.ComponentModel.Design.HelpKeywordAttribute("vs.data.DataSet")] public partial class MMABooksDataSet : global::System.Data.DataSet { private ProductsDataTable tableProducts; private global::System.Data.SchemaSerializationMode _schemaSerializationMode = global::System.Data.SchemaSerializationMode.IncludeSchema; [global::System.Diagnostics.DebuggerNonUserCodeAttribute()] [global::System.CodeDom.Compiler.GeneratedCodeAttribute("System.Data.Design.TypedDataSetGenerator", "4.0.0.0")] public MMABooksDataSet() { 32
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world water day, march 22 2010 EPN ESTIMATING THE MELTING OF TROPICAL GLACIERS USING LOCAL, REGIONAL, AND GLOBAL HYDROMETEOROLOGICAL DATA AND MODELING 1 1,2 1,3 Daniela Freile , Carla Manciati , and Remigio Galárraga-Sánchez School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Escuela Politécnica Nacional, Quito, Ecuador 2 University of Montpellier, France 3 Geological and Mining Engineering and Sciences, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, USA 1 INTRODUCTION: Long-term water supplies for large cities in the Andes, such as Quito, Ecuador, may be in jeopardy due to increasing rates of glacial melting. Melting rates in the tropics of South America in the past years have experienced greater amounts of retreat (Cáceres, et. al., 2005.; Sémiond, et. al., 1998). Climate data from a range of spatial (local, regional, and global) and temporal (monthly and seasonal) scales in conjunction with direct observations of melting of Glacier 15α and Los Crespos formed the basis for initial modeling of climate change effects on glacier hydrology. Antisana Icecap ECUADOR LOCAL INDICES, REGIONAL VARIABLES AND GLOBAL REANALYSIS LOCAL INDICES: precipitation with 2 and 9 months lag in the stations located in the glacier and in the paramo area were used as meteorological indices to define the degree of melting from the glacier. REGIONAL VARIABLES: Principal component analysis showed that there is a 38% in variance between local and regional stations located at the mountain zone (Highland region) and the Amazon region. GLOBAL REANALYSIS: ENSO, SOI, zonal wind, relative humidity, temperature reanalysis were used for these models, but temperature was the best variable to explain the melting from the glacier. MODELS TO EXPLAIN MELTING IN THE ABLATION ZONE AND LOCAL, REGIONAL AND GLOBAL HYDROMETEOROLOGICAL VARIABLES LOCAL AND REGIONAL MODEL South America http://www.exploringecuador.com/maps/region_todas.htm OVERALL OBJECTIVES: Define mathematical relationships between monthly and seasonal hydro meteorological data to determine the extent and rate of glacier melting from Glaciar 15α and Los Crespos in the Antisana Volcano in Ecuador. Quantify the temporal melting behavior into local, regional, and global hydro meteorological data. STUDY AREA AND BASIC DATA: ANTISANA VOLCANO, ECUADOR, SOUTH AMERICA ANTISANA VOLCANO, ECUADOR FULL REGIONAL AND GLOBAL MODEL Glacier 15 α and Los Crespos study area Source: INFORME ANUAL 2004 GREATICE Drawn by: Cáceres & Villacís, 2005 SIMPLIFIED REGIONAL MODEL LOCAL, REGIONAL AND GLOBAL INFORMATION LOCAL DATA: The GREATICE Project (INAMHI, EMAAP-Q, IRD) provided local information (precipitation, temperature, runoff) for 8 meteorological stations located in the Antisana Volcano from 1995 through 2005 for Glacier 15α and Los Crespos Glaciers. REGIONAL DATA: INAMHI provided regional information (precipitation and temperature) from 50 meteorological stations nationwide, including the oldest meteorological recording station in Ecuador (Observatiorio Astronómico de Quito) CONCLUSIONS: GLOBAL DATA: The International Research Institute for Climate and Society (http://iridl.ldeo.columbia.edu) provided global data on temperature, humidity, specific humidity, El Niño and ENSO indices, wind velocity and reflected longwave radiation. 1. Melting from high altitude glaciers located in the tropics of South America are subject to the direct influence of global temperature and it has been subject to an increasing rate in the past 30 years. 2. The great variability in the melting in the last 30 years show that changes are mainly subject to the variability of temperature and precipitation, but it is not clear if these changes are due to human intervention. 3.A linear combination of local precipitation—using a 9-month lag at station Paramo— and precipitation (M376) and temperature (M003) from regional meteorological stations reflects the time variability of melting from glaciers 15α and Los Crespos in the Antisana. 4.4. A linear combination of high-altitude temperature (700 mb of pressure) together with regional temperature (M003) and precipitation (M736) accounts for the time variability of melting from glaciers 15α and Los Crespos. 5.5. A simple linear regression between regional temperature (M003) and melting balance from glaciers 15 α and los Crespos represents the melting behavior of these two high-altitude tropical glaciers. BIBLIOGRAPHY: Cáceres, B., Maisincho, L., Taupin, J.D., Francou, B., Cadier, E., Delachaux, F., Bucher, R., Villacís, M., Paredes, D., Chazarin, J.P., Garcés, A., y Remy Laval, 2005. Glaciares del Ecuador: Antizana y Carihuayrazo. Balance de masa, Topografía, Meteorología e Hidrología. Informe del año 2004. IRD, INAMHI, EMAAP-QUITO. Quito. Sémiond, H., Francou, B., Ayabaca, E., De la Cruz, A. y Ramón Chango. 1998. El Glaciar 15 del Antizana Investigaciones glaciológicas 1994 – 1997. IFEA-ORSTOM, ORSTOM-CNRS, EMAAP-QUITO, INAMHI. Quito. Freile, Daniela & Manciati Carla, 2007 Relación a escala mensual y estacional entre la información hidrometeorológica local y regionaly la fusión de los glaciares tropicales del Ecuador. Casos de estudio: Glaciar15 y Glaciar “CRESPOS” del nevado Antisana. Tesis de Grado. Escuela Politécnica Nacional.
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Global Keyword In Python, global keyword allows you to modify the variable outside of the current scope. It is used to create a global variable and make changes to the variable in a local context. Rules of global Keyword  When we create a variable inside a function, it’s local by default.  When we define a variable outside of a function, it’s global by default. You don’t have to use global keyword.  We use global keyword to read and write a global variable inside a function.  Use of global keyword outside a function has no effect Example 6: Accessing global Variable From Inside a Function 9
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Namespaces and Scoping: • • • • • • • Variables are names (identifiers) that map to objects. A namespace is a dictionary of variable names (keys) and their corresponding objects (values). A Python statement can access variables in a local namespace and in the global namespace. If a local and a global variable have the same name, the local variable shadows the global variable. Each function has its own local namespace. Class methods follow the same scoping rule as ordinary functions. Python makes educated guesses on whether variables are local or global. It assumes that any variable assigned a value in a function is local. Therefore, in order to assign a value to a global variable within a function, you must first use the global statement. The statement global VarName tells Python that VarName is a global variable. Python stops searching the local namespace for the variable. For example, we define a variable Money in the global namespace. Within the function Money, we assign Money a value . therefor Python assumes Money is a local variable. However, we access the value of the local variable Money before setting it, so an UnboundLocalError is the result. Uncommenting the global statement fixes the problem.
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ECC leadership Leaders must demonstrate a sophisticated understanding of macro-economic, programs Emergi ng Supervis or Division Head Manag er Executi ve Challenges Challenges social, technological, environmental, regulatory and political trends for the Company to be successful. We help leaders to develop these strategic skills at all stages: For Supervisors we provide development opportunities to enhance effectiveness at managing multi-cultural teams and optimize organizational performance. Challenge s Collaborating across boundaries Challeng es Challenges Leading culturally diverse teams Understand the global business context Leverage global best practices Understand macroeconomics and politics Leading culturally diverse teams Understand the impact of global events on the business Anticipate future industry changes to maintain competitive advantage Understand the organization’s global market position At more senior levels, we prepare leaders to make strategic choices in a highly complex and ever-changing global environment. Our approach leverages the power of experiential learning as well as learning from world-class experts. These intensive experiences also emphasize immersion in local cultures to build a rich understanding and appreciation for the context in which our fellow employees, our partners and our customers live and work. We prepare leaders for higherl assignments by assessing their cultural flexibility and providing targeted development and coaching to help them adapt quickly and to gain the credibility they need to make an impact. Work with external partners to ensure smooth processes throughout the value chain 1 Trus t Select Solutions Foundational Leadership Competencies 2 Engage 3 Execute for Stakeholders Select Solutions Results Select Solutions Leadership Capability Assessments Leadership Capability Assessments Leader Development Program Global Leader Development Program Leading Globally ECC Management Development Seminar Building Global Awareness 1 3 Create a culture of collaboration across organizational boundaries Select Solutions Understand unique business dynamics when working across geographies and cultures Building broad stakeholder networks outside the organization 4 Self- Accountability Select Solutions Leadership Capability Assessments Leadership Capability Assessments Leader Development Board Directors Program Leader Development Program Business and ECC Management Development Culture Seminar Board Directors 1 4
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CHW Global health elective policy Pediatric and Medicine-Pediatric residents can participate in a single, one month-long pediatric* global health elective if they: • are in good standing with their residency program and are entering their senior year of residency (late PGY-2 or PGY-3 for pediatric residents; PGY-3 or PGY-4 for med-peds residents); • enrolled in the global health track as interns and are on target to complete the annual global health track requirements as outlined by the training program; • have chosen an elective that will ensure daily physician preceptorship, is in a safe environment, and is approved by CHW/MCW residency and MCWAH leadership; and • commit to completion of a patient log and summary of their elective experience. Residents who meet the above criteria should submit their request to participate no later than May 15 th of the academic year preceding the elective to the Global Health Track Directors • Requests should occur earlier than 5/15 if the elective will be in the summer or early fall, as MCWAH forms need to be submitted no later than 4 months prior to the start of the elective • Deadline for submission of MCWAH forms for late fall/winter/spring electives is July 1st of the academic year Residents who wish to participate in a global health elective should be sure to properly share this preference with the pediatric/medicine-pediatric chief residents on the annual master schedule preference list submission • It is recommended to make this a high priority preference in your annual master schedule preference list to maximize the likelihood of receiving a global health eligible elective slot during the appropriate block. Should this policy change, it will be retrospectively applied to all senior residents who enrolled under the policy as interns and met the above requirements. Policy last reviewed by Drs St Clair, Kuzminski, Weisgerber, Toth & Gutzeit 2/2016. *Note: A pediatric global health elective is one that has salary support provided by CHW for the month-long elective. For Medicine-Pediatric residents, they additionally can pursue a salary-supported Froedtert global health elective slot—availability and number of slots may vary annually per the discretion of Froedtert’s leadership.
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Chapter 5 Learning Place Slide Title Text Here Dashboard 1. Management and Globalization 1. 2. 3. 4. Global management Why companies go global How companies go global Global business environments 2. Global Businesses 1. 2. 3. 4. Types of global businesses Pros and cons of global businesses Ethics challenges for global businesses Global business environments ©2013 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved. 5-3
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Principles of Macroeconomics • Macroeconomics studies the behaviors of overall economy. • Goals of Macroeconomics – Sustainable economic growth – Full employment – Stable price
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Microeconomics vs Macroeconomics  Macroeconomics studies the performance of national economies and the policies that governments use to try to improve that performance     Inflation Unemployment Growth Macroeconomics considers    Monetary policy Deficits Tax policy
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The Scope of Economics Microeconomics and Macroeconomics microeconomics The branch of economics that examines the functioning of individual industries and the behavior of individual decision-making units —that is, firms and households. macroeconomics The branch of economics that examines the economic behavior of aggregates—income, employment, output, and so on—on a national scale. Microeconomics looks at the individual unit—the household, the firm, the industry. It sees and examines the “trees.” Macroeconomics looks at the whole, the aggregate. It sees and analyzes the “forest.” © 2014 Pearson Education, Inc. 10 of 36
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